Tag Archives: sheets

Build with G Suite

Today wraps our annual Google I/O conference. Thousands of developers from around the world gathered to learn about our latest developer products and share best practices, including how to build next-gen business applications using G Suite. In case you need it, here’s a list of the various developer tools you can use to customize app your G Suite experience at your organization.

1. Build and deploy custom apps using App Maker 

App Maker is a low-code, application development tool in G Suite that helps developers quickly build and deploy custom apps securely. It comes with built-in templates, a drag-and-drop UI and point-and-click data modeling. Plus, you can customize your app to connect with a wide range of APIs using Apps Script. App Maker is currently available as part of an Early Adopter Program for G Suite Business customers. Learn more.

App Maker GIF

2. Create seamless integrations with the G Suite APIs

Speaking of APIs, G Suite offers a number of ways for developers to integrate their app with ours and create a seamless experience for users. Here are a few of our favorite G Suite APIs.

  • Try the Sheets API which lets your developers read, write and format data in Sheets. Plus, you can automatically generate and update charts, pivot tables and more.
  • The Slides API helps you access and update presentations programmatically, pulling in data from various sources (including popular third-party apps) and producing polished template-based presentations in a fraction of the time.
  • Leverage the Gmail API to access and organize your Gmail inbox. You can program your application to read and send messages, create filters to automatically label, forward and archive messages, or even update vacation responders.
  • Finally, the Drive API allows you to manage Google Drive files and/or folders as well as leverage new Team Drive features programmatically. Developers can also use the Drive SDK to create Drive-enabled apps that handle custom files.

3. Customize your G Suite experience with Add-ons 

Using Apps Script, G Suite's native JavaScript-based development platform, developers can easily customize their favorite apps like Sheets, Docs, and Forms by adding menu items, sidebars or editing files programmatically directly within these apps. We also recently introduced Gmail Add-ons in developer preview, so that third-party developers can bring the power of their apps directly into Gmail. Better yet, developers need only write their Gmail Add-on once, and it’ll run natively in Gmail on web, Android and iOS right away.

Quickbooks GIF
Image credit: Intuit and Prosperworks

To learn more about how you can integrate and better customize your business applications for G Suite, check out the G Suite Developers blog or the G Suite Developers show. You can also subscribe to the G Suite Developers newsletter for updates.

Source: Drive


Build with G Suite

Today wraps our annual Google I/O conference. Thousands of developers from around the world gathered to learn about our latest developer products and share best practices, including how to build next-gen business applications using G Suite. In case you need it, here’s a list of the various developer tools you can use to customize app your G Suite experience at your organization.

1. Build and deploy custom apps using App Maker 

App Maker is a low-code, application development tool in G Suite that helps developers quickly build and deploy custom apps securely. It comes with built-in templates, a drag-and-drop UI and point-and-click data modeling. Plus, you can customize your app to connect with a wide range of APIs using Apps Script. App Maker is currently available as part of an Early Adopter Program for G Suite Business customers. Learn more.

App Maker GIF

2. Create seamless integrations with the G Suite APIs

Speaking of APIs, G Suite offers a number of ways for developers to integrate their app with ours and create a seamless experience for users. Here are a few of our favorite G Suite APIs.

  • Try the Sheets API which lets your developers read, write and format data in Sheets. Plus, you can automatically generate and update charts, pivot tables and more.
  • The Slides API helps you access and update presentations programmatically, pulling in data from various sources (including popular third-party apps) and producing polished template-based presentations in a fraction of the time.
  • Leverage the Gmail API to access and organize your Gmail inbox. You can program your application to read and send messages, create filters to automatically label, forward and archive messages, or even update vacation responders.
  • Finally, the Drive API allows you to manage Google Drive files and/or folders as well as leverage new Team Drive features programmatically. Developers can also use the Drive SDK to create Drive-enabled apps that handle custom files.

3. Customize your G Suite experience with Add-ons 

Using Apps Script, G Suite's native JavaScript-based development platform, developers can easily customize their favorite apps like Sheets, Docs, and Forms by adding menu items, sidebars or editing files programmatically directly within these apps. We also recently introduced Gmail Add-ons in developer preview, so that third-party developers can bring the power of their apps directly into Gmail. Better yet, developers need only write their Gmail Add-on once, and it’ll run natively in Gmail on web, Android and iOS right away.

Quickbooks GIF
Image credit: Intuit and Prosperworks

To learn more about how you can integrate and better customize your business applications for G Suite, check out the G Suite Developers blog or the G Suite Developers show. You can also subscribe to the G Suite Developers newsletter for updates.

Source: Gmail Blog


Bring your idea to life with G Suite

You know that feeling when you present on a project after working on it for too many months? It’s great. Perhaps the most gratifying part of wrapping a project (besides finally being done), is reflecting on how your idea came to be more than just an idea.

For most of us in the workplace, ideas take shape in many forms—and G Suite can help you along the way. Here’s a snapshot of how you can bring an idea to life using G Suite’s intelligent apps:

1. You mention an idea to a teammate over lunch

Some of our best ideas happen outside the confines of the office. You mention an idea to a teammate in passing and they tell you, “Hey, that’s not a bad thought, but we should meet to flesh this out.”

Take your idea to the next level by getting your group together with Find a Time and Find a Room features in Calendar. Find a Time intelligently suggests times that you and teammates are available to meet and books a time for you. Find a Room takes over the hassle of finding an available meeting room. All you have to do is show up and brainstorm.

Find a Time gif

2. Step into a meeting room and map out your idea 

Now that you’ve booked a room, you can put more structure behind this “thing” you’re creating with Jamboard—our collaborative, digital whiteboard for sharing ideas in real-time and mapping out your project plan. Check it out:

If you used legacy systems in the past, you probably brought documents, sticky notes or other prep materials to a brainstorm. With Jamboard, you securely access all of those files directly in the cloud within your “jam.” Simply use the sticky notes tool, pull information and images from the web, or add files from Docs, Sheets or Slides to your brainstorm directly from Drive.

3. Give your brain a rest and come back to your work later

Sometimes the best thing you can do for a project is take a break and revisit it with fresh eyes. Jamboard makes this easy because it saves your work directly to Drive. If you’re on the go and want to revisit a file, you can rely on Drive’s Quick Access feature to automatically find files for you. And if you use Team Drives, you can add relevant files to securely share access and edit rights with others that need to weigh in.

team drives transparent

4. Make final edits and present your idea

Once you’ve put the final touches on your “jam,” you can present your work through Hangouts, which integrates seamlessly with Jamboard. Add team members to the Hangout to see your work, and they can even use the Jamboard companion app to make edits from their mobile phones or tablets. 

For a presentation you really want to polish, you can also import your work from Jamboard into a presentation in Slides. If you don’t like to fuss with formatting, use Explore in Slides, powered by machine intelligence, to make your presentation look top notch. Choose from dozens of design recommendations and apply them instantly with one click. Now you’re ready to sell your idea.

Explore in Sheets

5. Track your progress

Coming up with the ideas is the fun part. Executing and tracking success is often more difficult. G Suite can help with that, too. Use templates in Sheets to create detailed project trackers or manage employee shift schedules. Sheets can also help you quantify results at the end of your project. Use Explore in Sheets (powered by machine intelligence) to get insights instantly. Just ask questions—in words, not formulas—and get actionable insights from your data. And once you’re finished, create a Form to solicit feedback on how to improve for the next time.

These are just some of the ways that G Suite can help you create—and execute—your best work. For more tips on how to use G Suite products, check out the G Suite Show.

Bring your idea to life with G Suite

You know that feeling when you present on a project after working on it for too many months? It’s great. Perhaps the most gratifying part of wrapping a project (besides finally being done), is reflecting on how your idea came to be more than just an idea.

For most of us in the workplace, ideas take shape in many forms—and G Suite can help you along the way. Here’s a snapshot of how you can bring an idea to life using G Suite’s intelligent apps:

1. You mention an idea to a teammate over lunch

Some of our best ideas happen outside the confines of the office. You mention an idea to a teammate in passing and they tell you, “Hey, that’s not a bad thought, but we should meet to flesh this out.”

Take your idea to the next level by getting your group together with Find a Time and Find a Room features in Calendar. Find a Time intelligently suggests times that you and teammates are available to meet and books a time for you. Find a Room takes over the hassle of finding an available meeting room. All you have to do is show up and brainstorm.

Find a Time gif

2. Step into a meeting room and map out your idea 

Now that you’ve booked a room, you can put more structure behind this “thing” you’re creating with Jamboard—our collaborative, digital whiteboard for sharing ideas in real-time and mapping out your project plan. Check it out:

If you used legacy systems in the past, you probably brought documents, sticky notes or other prep materials to a brainstorm. With Jamboard, you securely access all of those files directly in the cloud within your “jam.” Simply use the sticky notes tool, pull information and images from the web, or add files from Docs, Sheets or Slides to your brainstorm directly from Drive.

3. Give your brain a rest and come back to your work later

Sometimes the best thing you can do for a project is take a break and revisit it with fresh eyes. Jamboard makes this easy because it saves your work directly to Drive. If you’re on the go and want to revisit a file, you can rely on Drive’s Quick Access feature to automatically find files for you. And if you use Team Drives, you can add relevant files to securely share access and edit rights with others that need to weigh in.

team drives transparent

4. Make final edits and present your idea

Once you’ve put the final touches on your “jam,” you can present your work through Hangouts, which integrates seamlessly with Jamboard. Add team members to the Hangout to see your work, and they can even use the Jamboard companion app to make edits from their mobile phones or tablets. 

For a presentation you really want to polish, you can also import your work from Jamboard into a presentation in Slides. If you don’t like to fuss with formatting, use Explore in Slides, powered by machine intelligence, to make your presentation look top notch. Choose from dozens of design recommendations and apply them instantly with one click. Now you’re ready to sell your idea.

Explore in Sheets

5. Track your progress

Coming up with the ideas is the fun part. Executing and tracking success is often more difficult. G Suite can help with that, too. Use templates in Sheets to create detailed project trackers or manage employee shift schedules. Sheets can also help you quantify results at the end of your project. Use Explore in Sheets (powered by machine intelligence) to get insights instantly. Just ask questions—in words, not formulas—and get actionable insights from your data. And once you’re finished, create a Form to solicit feedback on how to improve for the next time.

These are just some of the ways that G Suite can help you create—and execute—your best work. For more tips on how to use G Suite products, check out the G Suite Show.

Source: Drive


How machine learning in G Suite makes people more productive

Email management, formatting documents, creating expense reports. These are just some of the time-sinks that can affect your productivity at work. At Google, this is referred to as “overhead”—time spent working on tasks that do not directly relate to creative output—and it happens a lot.

According to a Google study in 2015, the average worker spends only about 5% of his or her time actually coming up with the next big idea. The rest of our time is caught in the quicksand of formatting, tracking, analysis or other mundane tasks. That’s where machine learning can help.

Machine learning algorithms observe examples and make predictions based on data. In G Suite, machine learning models make your workday more efficient by taking over menial tasks, like scheduling meetings, or by predicting information you might need and surfacing it for you, like suggesting Docs.

Time spent chart

Source: Google Data, April 2015

Eliminating spam within Gmail using machine learning

One of the earliest machine learning use cases for G Suite was within Gmail. Historically, Gmail used a rule-based system, which meant our anti-spam team would create new rules to match individual spam patterns. Over a decade of using this process, we improved spam detection accuracy to 99%.

Starting in 2014, our team augmented this rule-based system to generate rules using machine learning algorithms instead, taking spam detection one step further. Now, we use Tensor Flow and other machine learning to continually regenerate the “spam filter,” so the system has learned to predict which emails are most likely junk. Machine learning finds new patterns and adapts far quicker than previous manual systems—it’s a big part of the reason that more than one billion Gmail users avoid spam within their account.

See machine learning in your favorite G Suite apps

G Suite’s goal is to help teams accomplish more with its intelligent apps, no matter where they are in the world. And chances are, you’ve already seen machine learning integrated into your day-to-day work to do just that.

Smart Reply, for example, uses machine learning to generate three natural language responses to an email. So if you find yourself on the road or pressed for time and in need of a quick way to clear your inbox, let Smart Reply do it for you.
Smart Reply GIF

Explore in Docs, Slides and Sheets uses machine learning to eliminate time spent on mundane tasks, like tracking down documents or information on the web, reformatting presentations or performing calculations within spreadsheets.

Explore

Quick Access in Drive predicts and suggests files you might need within Drive. Using machine intelligence, Quick Access can predict files based on who you share files with frequently, when relevant meetings occur within your Calendar or if you tend to use files at certain times of the day.

Quick Access

To learn more about how machine intelligence can make your life easier, sign up for this free webinar on June 15, 2017, featuring experts from MIT Research, Google and other companies. You can also check out the Big Data and Machine Learning blog or watch this video from Google Cloud Next with Ryan Tabone, director of product management at Google, where he explains more about “overhead.”

Source: Gmail Blog


How machine learning in G Suite makes people more productive

Email management, formatting documents, creating expense reports. These are just some of the time-sinks that can affect your productivity at work. At Google, this is referred to as “overhead”—time spent working on tasks that do not directly relate to creative output—and it happens a lot.

According to a Google study in 2015, the average worker spends only about 5% of his or her time actually coming up with the next big idea. The rest of our time is caught in the quicksand of formatting, tracking, analysis or other mundane tasks. That’s where machine learning can help.

Machine learning algorithms observe examples and make predictions based on data. In G Suite, machine learning models make your workday more efficient by taking over menial tasks, like scheduling meetings, or by predicting information you might need and surfacing it for you, like suggesting Docs.

Time spent chart

Source: Google Data, April 2015

Eliminating spam within Gmail using machine learning

One of the earliest machine learning use cases for G Suite was within Gmail. Historically, Gmail used a rule-based system, which meant our anti-spam team would create new rules to match individual spam patterns. Over a decade of using this process, we improved spam detection accuracy to 99%.

Starting in 2014, our team augmented this rule-based system to generate rules using machine learning algorithms instead, taking spam detection one step further. Now, we use Tensor Flow and other machine learning to continually regenerate the “spam filter,” so the system has learned to predict which emails are most likely junk. Machine learning finds new patterns and adapts far quicker than previous manual systems—it’s a big part of the reason that more than one billion Gmail users avoid spam within their account.

See machine learning in your favorite G Suite apps

G Suite’s goal is to help teams accomplish more with its intelligent apps, no matter where they are in the world. And chances are, you’ve already seen machine learning integrated into your day-to-day work to do just that.

Smart Reply, for example, uses machine learning to generate three natural language responses to an email. So if you find yourself on the road or pressed for time and in need of a quick way to clear your inbox, let Smart Reply do it for you.
Smart Reply GIF

Explore in Docs, Slides and Sheets uses machine learning to eliminate time spent on mundane tasks, like tracking down documents or information on the web, reformatting presentations or performing calculations within spreadsheets.

Explore

Quick Access in Drive predicts and suggests files you might need within Drive. Using machine intelligence, Quick Access can predict files based on who you share files with frequently, when relevant meetings occur within your Calendar or if you tend to use files at certain times of the day.

Quick Access

To learn more about how machine intelligence can make your life easier, sign up for this free webinar on June 15, 2017, featuring experts from MIT Research, Google and other companies. You can also check out the Big Data and Machine Learning blog or watch this video from Google Cloud Next with Ryan Tabone, director of product management at Google, where he explains more about “overhead.”

How machine learning in G Suite makes people more productive

Email management, formatting documents, creating expense reports. These are just some of the time-sinks that can affect your productivity at work. At Google, this is referred to as “overhead”—time spent working on tasks that do not directly relate to creative output—and it happens a lot.

According to a Google study in 2015, the average worker spends only about 5 percent of his or her time actually coming up with the next big idea. The rest of our time is caught in the quicksand of formatting, tracking, analysis or other mundane tasks. That’s where machine learning can help.

Machine learning algorithms observe examples and make predictions based on data. In G Suite, machine learning models make your workday more efficient by taking over menial tasks, like scheduling meetings, or by predicting information you might need and surfacing it for you, like suggesting Docs.

Time spent chart

Source: Google Data, April 2015

Eliminating spam within Gmail using machine learning

One of the earliest machine learning use cases for G Suite was within Gmail. Historically, Gmail used a rule-based system, which meant our anti-spam team would create new rules to match individual spam patterns. Over a decade of using this process, we improved spam detection accuracy to 99 percent.

Starting in 2014, our team augmented this rule-based system to generate rules using machine learning algorithms instead, taking spam detection one step further. Now, we use TensorFlow and other machine learning to continually regenerate the “spam filter,” so the system has learned to predict which emails are most likely junk. Machine learning finds new patterns and adapts far quicker than previous manual systems—it’s a big part of the reason that more than one billion Gmail users avoid spam within their account.

See machine learning in your favorite G Suite apps

G Suite’s goal is to help teams accomplish more with its intelligent apps, no matter where they are in the world. And chances are, you’ve already seen machine learning integrated into your day-to-day work to do just that.

Smart Reply, for example, uses machine learning to generate three natural language responses to an email. So if you find yourself on the road or pressed for time and in need of a quick way to clear your inbox, let Smart Reply do it for you.
Smart Reply GIF

Explore in Docs, Slides and Sheets uses machine learning to eliminate time spent on mundane tasks, like tracking down documents or information on the web, reformatting presentations or performing calculations within spreadsheets.

Explore

Quick Access in Drive predicts and suggests files you might need within Drive. Using machine intelligence, Quick Access can predict files based on who you share files with frequently, when relevant meetings occur within your Calendar or if you tend to use files at certain times of the day.

Quick Access

To learn more about how machine intelligence can make your life easier, sign up for this free webinar on June 15, 2017, featuring experts from MIT Research, Google and other companies. You can also check out the Big Data and Machine Learning blog or watch this video from Google Cloud Next with Ryan Tabone, director of product management at Google, where he explains more about “overhead.”

Source: Google Cloud


#TodayIAm sharing stories of amazing women at Google Cloud

Last month we asked women across our team to share what they’re working on, and I was inspired by the range of cool projects, from building submarine cable systems to helping developers create immersive games with real location data from Google Maps. While scrolling through Twitter in the evenings, the #TodayIAm pics always made me smile. They reminded me of how many different ways women are contributing to building great customer experiences with Google Cloud technology.

We asked five of these awesome women to share a bit more about advice they had received along the way, and advice they want to give. Here's what they had to say.

Today, Lisa Bickford is...

Lisa 2

Lisa Bickford is a program manager at Google Cloud. She’s building submarine cable systems in South America. This new network infrastructure will help connect the next billion users to Google.

Advice that’s helped Lisa: I like to reference Teddy Roosevelt's The Man in the Arena: “It’s not the critic who counts, but credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena.” Gender notwithstanding, I take this quote to heart each day.

Lisa’s advice: Own your knowledge, own your ability and take your seat at the table. You might be the only woman there sometimes, but not for long.

Today, Annie Ma-Weaver is…

Annie

Annie Ma-Weaver is a strategic technology partner manager at Google. She’s helping large companies, especially in industries like healthcare, financial services and retail, solve complex business problems using the cloud.

Advice that’s helped Annie: A former colleague told me to know my stuff like an entrepreneur. It’s not enough to know one part of the business well—it’s better to understand the entire end-to-end process. This mindset helps me obtain the depth of knowledge and discipline to work cross-functionally. It also helps me advocate for our customers and ease bottlenecks.

Annie’s advice: Raise your hand for projects that stretch your ability. I often fight with my imposter syndrome when I'm presented with a new technical challenge. I’ll think to myself that I'm not familiar with the technical stack or the players involved, but I always push myself to volunteer anyway.

The beauty of technology is that it's always changing, so most people are learning as they go. You can pick up new technical knowledge through online learning modules and meeting with specialists both inside and outside of your company. Taking on stretch opportunities is a great way to keep your skill set fresh and help you advance your career in technology.

Today, Ritcha Ranjan is…

Ritcha resized

Ritcha Ranjan is a product manager at Google. She’s helping millions of people across the world save time at work by bringing machine intelligence into Docs, Sheets and Slides. Her team is democratizing Google technology for businesses—reducing 10+ steps to accomplish tasks to a single click.

Advice that’s helped Ritcha: There is a big difference between a “mentor” and a “sponsor.” Sponsors are willing to take a bet on you and tie their success to yours—like offering you a stretch project or recommending you for a new role. A strong network of sponsors can play a critical part in accelerating your career.

Ritcha’s advice: Always be optimistic. There are a million reasons why something can't be done. Find the way it can be done and make it happen! Also, don't be afraid to negotiate on your own behalf. You need to be your best advocate (I'm still learning this one).

Today, Larisse Voufo Douagny is...

Larisse 2

Larisse Voufo Douangny is a software engineer at Google Cloud. She’s improving performance testing for compiler releases. She independently designed and implemented “GenBench,” a product that helps her team work around legacy systems and better calibrate releases.

Advice that’s helped Larisse: Just be you and be proud of your accomplishments.

Larisse’s advice: Again, don’t be afraid to be yourself and to follow your passion with confidence.

Today, Clementine Jacoby is….

clem 2

Clementine Jacoby is an associate product manager at Google Maps. She’s building the future of real-world games by helping developers create immersive, global games with real location data.

Advice that’s helped Clementine: Distrust your own sense of what’s feasible. When you have two equally exciting choices, find a way to try both. I’ve always been intrigued by shiny opportunities, which would often bring me to forks in the road. A software engineering internship or a full-time circus gig in Brazil? Anthropology research in Tanzania or recording pop music in Sweden? Cognitive science or tech?

Starting with the assumption that I’d “do both” was a paradigm shift. It has saved me countless hours of analysis paralysis. The best way to compare opportunities—especially big, important ones—is to try them on for size. Trying a few steps of “both” is often enough and the right choice becomes obvious. Plus, we’re capable of more than we think we are. Opportunities that energize and expand our capacity make us better.

Clementine’s advice: Do both. Chase the things that excite you—prune later.

And by the way, we’re hiring at Google Cloud across engineering, marketing, technical writing and many other functions. If you’re looking to make a leap in your career, apply. We’d love to hear from you!

#TodayIAm sharing stories of amazing women at Google Cloud

Last month we asked women across our team to share what they’re working on, and I was inspired by the range of cool projects, from building submarine cable systems to helping developers create immersive games with real location data from Google Maps. While scrolling through Twitter in the evenings, the #TodayIAm pics always made me smile. They reminded me of how many different ways women are contributing to building great customer experiences with Google Cloud technology.

We asked five of these awesome women to share a bit more about advice they had received along the way, and advice they want to give. Here's what they had to say.

Today, Lisa Bickford is...

Lisa 2

Lisa Bickford is a program manager at Google Cloud. She’s building submarine cable systems in South America. This new network infrastructure will help connect the next billion users to Google.

Advice that’s helped Lisa: I like to reference Teddy Roosevelt's The Man in the Arena: “It’s not the critic who counts, but credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena.” Gender notwithstanding, I take this quote to heart each day.

Lisa’s advice: Own your knowledge, own your ability and take your seat at the table. You might be the only woman there sometimes, but not for long.

Today, Annie Ma-Weaver is…

Annie

Annie Ma-Weaver is a strategic technology partner manager at Google. She’s helping large companies, especially in industries like healthcare, financial services and retail, solve complex business problems using the cloud.

Advice that’s helped Annie: A former colleague told me to know my stuff like an entrepreneur. It’s not enough to know one part of the business well—it’s better to understand the entire end-to-end process. This mindset helps me obtain the depth of knowledge and discipline to work cross-functionally. It also helps me advocate for our customers and ease bottlenecks.

Annie’s advice: Raise your hand for projects that stretch your ability. I often fight with my imposter syndrome when I'm presented with a new technical challenge. I’ll think to myself that I'm not familiar with the technical stack or the players involved, but I always push myself to volunteer anyway.

The beauty of technology is that it's always changing, so most people are learning as they go. You can pick up new technical knowledge through online learning modules and meeting with specialists both inside and outside of your company. Taking on stretch opportunities is a great way to keep your skill set fresh and help you advance your career in technology.

Today, Ritcha Ranjan is…

Ritcha resized

Ritcha Ranjan is a product manager at Google. She’s helping millions of people across the world save time at work by bringing machine intelligence into Docs, Sheets and Slides. Her team is democratizing Google technology for businesses—reducing 10+ steps to accomplish tasks to a single click.

Advice that’s helped Ritcha: There is a big difference between a “mentor” and a “sponsor.” Sponsors are willing to take a bet on you and tie their success to yours—like offering you a stretch project or recommending you for a new role. A strong network of sponsors can play a critical part in accelerating your career.

Ritcha’s advice: Always be optimistic. There are a million reasons why something can't be done. Find the way it can be done and make it happen! Also, don't be afraid to negotiate on your own behalf. You need to be your best advocate (I'm still learning this one).

Today, Larisse Voufo Douagny is...

Larisse 2

Larisse Voufo Douangny is a software engineer at Google Cloud. She’s improving performance testing for compiler releases. She independently designed and implemented “GenBench,” a product that helps her team work around legacy systems and better calibrate releases.

Advice that’s helped Larisse: Just be you and be proud of your accomplishments.

Larisse’s advice: Again, don’t be afraid to be yourself and to follow your passion with confidence.

Today, Clementine Jacoby is….

clem 2

Clementine Jacoby is an associate product manager at Google Maps. She’s building the future of real-world games by helping developers create immersive, global games with real location data.

Advice that’s helped Clementine: Distrust your own sense of what’s feasible. When you have two equally exciting choices, find a way to try both. I’ve always been intrigued by shiny opportunities, which would often bring me to forks in the road. A software engineering internship or a full-time circus gig in Brazil? Anthropology research in Tanzania or recording pop music in Sweden? Cognitive science or tech?

Starting with the assumption that I’d “do both” was a paradigm shift. It has saved me countless hours of analysis paralysis. The best way to compare opportunities—especially big, important ones—is to try them on for size. Trying a few steps of “both” is often enough and the right choice becomes obvious. Plus, we’re capable of more than we think we are. Opportunities that energize and expand our capacity make us better.

Clementine’s advice: Do both. Chase the things that excite you—prune later.

And by the way, we’re hiring at Google Cloud across engineering, marketing, technical writing and many other functions. If you’re looking to make a leap in your career, apply. We’d love to hear from you!

Source: Google Cloud


#TodayIAm sharing stories of amazing women at Google Cloud

Last month we asked women across our team to share what they’re working on, and I was inspired by the range of cool projects, from building submarine cable systems to helping developers create immersive games with real location data from Google Maps. While scrolling through Twitter in the evenings, the #TodayIAm pics always made me smile. They reminded me of how many different ways women are contributing to building great customer experiences with Google Cloud technology.

We asked five of these awesome women to share a bit more about advice they had received along the way, and advice they want to give. Here's what they had to say.

Today, Lisa Bickford is...

Lisa 2

Lisa Bickford is a program manager at Google Cloud. She’s building submarine cable systems in South America. This new network infrastructure will help connect the next billion users to Google.

Advice that’s helped Lisa: I like to reference Teddy Roosevelt's The Man in the Arena: “It’s not the critic who counts, but credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena.” Gender notwithstanding, I take this quote to heart each day.

Lisa’s advice: Own your knowledge, own your ability and take your seat at the table. You might be the only woman there sometimes, but not for long.

Today, Annie Ma-Weaver is…

Annie

Annie Ma-Weaver is a strategic technology partner manager at Google. She’s helping large companies, especially in industries like healthcare, financial services and retail, solve complex business problems using the cloud.

Advice that’s helped Annie: A former colleague told me to know my stuff like an entrepreneur. It’s not enough to know one part of the business well—it’s better to understand the entire end-to-end process. This mindset helps me obtain the depth of knowledge and discipline to work cross-functionally. It also helps me advocate for our customers and ease bottlenecks.

Annie’s advice: Raise your hand for projects that stretch your ability. I often fight with my imposter syndrome when I'm presented with a new technical challenge. I’ll think to myself that I'm not familiar with the technical stack or the players involved, but I always push myself to volunteer anyway.

The beauty of technology is that it's always changing, so most people are learning as they go. You can pick up new technical knowledge through online learning modules and meeting with specialists both inside and outside of your company. Taking on stretch opportunities is a great way to keep your skill set fresh and help you advance your career in technology.

Today, Ritcha Ranjan is…

Ritcha resized

Ritcha Ranjan is a product manager at Google. She’s helping millions of people across the world save time at work by bringing machine intelligence into Docs, Sheets and Slides. Her team is democratizing Google technology for businesses—reducing 10+ steps to accomplish tasks to a single click.

Advice that’s helped Ritcha: There is a big difference between a “mentor” and a “sponsor.” Sponsors are willing to take a bet on you and tie their success to yours—like offering you a stretch project or recommending you for a new role. A strong network of sponsors can play a critical part in accelerating your career.

Ritcha’s advice: Always be optimistic. There are a million reasons why something can't be done. Find the way it can be done and make it happen! Also, don't be afraid to negotiate on your own behalf. You need to be your best advocate (I'm still learning this one).

Today, Larisse Voufo Douagny is...

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Larisse Voufo Douangny is a software engineer at Google Cloud. She’s improving performance testing for compiler releases. She independently designed and implemented “GenBench,” a product that helps her team work around legacy systems and better calibrate releases.

Advice that’s helped Larisse: Just be you and be proud of your accomplishments.

Larisse’s advice: Again, don’t be afraid to be yourself and to follow your passion with confidence.

Today, Clementine Jacoby is….

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Clementine Jacoby is an associate product manager at Google Maps. She’s building the future of real-world games by helping developers create immersive, global games with real location data.

Advice that’s helped Clementine: Distrust your own sense of what’s feasible. When you have two equally exciting choices, find a way to try both. I’ve always been intrigued by shiny opportunities, which would often bring me to forks in the road. A software engineering internship or a full-time circus gig in Brazil? Anthropology research in Tanzania or recording pop music in Sweden? Cognitive science or tech?

Starting with the assumption that I’d “do both” was a paradigm shift. It has saved me countless hours of analysis paralysis. The best way to compare opportunities—especially big, important ones—is to try them on for size. Trying a few steps of “both” is often enough and the right choice becomes obvious. Plus, we’re capable of more than we think we are. Opportunities that energize and expand our capacity make us better.

Clementine’s advice: Do both. Chase the things that excite you—prune later.

And by the way, we’re hiring at Google Cloud across engineering, marketing, technical writing and many other functions. If you’re looking to make a leap in your career, apply. We’d love to hear from you!