Tag Archives: JavaScript

Search at Google I/O 2019

Google I/O is our yearly developer conference where we have the pleasure of announcing some exciting new Search-related features and capabilities. A good place to start is Google Search: State of the Union, which explains how to take advantage of the latest capabilities in Google Search:

We also gave more details on how JavaScript and Google Search work together and what you can do to make sure your JavaScript site performs well in Search.

Try out new features today

Here are some of the new features, codelabs, and documentation that you can try out today:
The Google I/O sign at Shoreline Amphitheatre at Mountain View, CA

Be among the first to test new features

Your help is invaluable to making sure our products work for everyone. We shared some new features that we're still testing and would love your feedback and participation.
A large crowd at Google I/O

Learn more about what's coming soon

I/O is a place where we get to showcase new Search features, so we're excited to give you a heads up on what's next on the horizon:
Two people posing for a photo at Google I/O, forming a heart with their arms

We hope these cool announcements help & inspire you to create even better websites that work well in Search. Should you have any questions, feel free to post in our webmaster help forums, contact us on Twitter, or reach out to us at any of the next events we're at.

Google I/O 2019 – What sessions should SEOs and webmasters watch?

Google I/O 2019 is starting tomorrow and will run for 3 days, until Thursday. Google I/O is our yearly developers festival, where product announcements are made, new APIs and frameworks are introduced, and Product Managers present the latest from Google to an audience of 7,000+ developers who fly to California.

However, you don't have to physically attend the event to take advantage of this once-a-year opportunity: many conferences and talks are live streamed on YouTube for anyone to watch. Browse the full schedule of events, including a list of talks that we think will be interesting for webmasters to watch (all talks are in English). All the links shared below will bring you to pages with more details about each talk, and links to watch the sessions will display on the day of each event. All times are Pacific Central time (California time).



This list is only a small part of the agenda that we think is useful to webmasters and SEOs. There are many more sessions that you could find interesting! To learn about those other talks, check out the full list of “web” sessions, design sessions, Cloud sessions, machine learning sessions, and more. Use the filtering function to toggle the sessions on and off.

We hope you can make the time to watch the talks online, and participate in the excitement of I/O ! The videos will also be available on Youtube after the event, in case you can't tune in live.

Posted by Vincent Courson, Search Outreach Specialist

Code that final mile: from big data analysis to slide presentation

Posted by Wesley Chun (@wescpy), Developer Advocate, Google Cloud

Google Cloud Platform (GCP) provides infrastructure, serverless products, and APIs that help you build, innovate, and scale. G Suite provides a collection of productivity tools, developer APIs, extensibility frameworks and low-code platforms that let you integrate with G Suite applications, data, and users. While each solution is compelling on its own, users can get more power and flexibility by leveraging both together.

In the latest episode of the G Suite Dev Show, I'll show you one example of how you can take advantage of powerful GCP tools right from G Suite applications. BigQuery, for example, can help you surface valuable insight from massive amounts of data. However, regardless of "the tech" you use, you still have to justify and present your findings to management, right? You've already completed the big data analysis part, so why not go that final mile and tap into G Suite for its strengths? In the sample app covered in the video, we show you how to go from big data analysis all the way to an "exec-ready" presentation.

The sample application is meant to give you an idea of what's possible. While the video walks through the code a bit more, let's give all of you a high-level overview here. Google Apps Script is a G Suite serverless development platform that provides straightforward access to G Suite APIs as well as some GCP tools such as BigQuery. The first part of our app, the runQuery() function, issues a query to BigQuery from Apps Script then connects to Google Sheets to store the results into a new Sheet (note we left out CONSTANT variable definitions for brevity):

function runQuery() {
// make BigQuery request
var request = {query: BQ_QUERY};
var queryResults = BigQuery.Jobs.query(request, PROJECT_ID);
var jobId = queryResults.jobReference.jobId;
queryResults = BigQuery.Jobs.getQueryResults(PROJECT_ID, jobId);
var rows = queryResults.rows;

// put results into a 2D array
var data = new Array(rows.length);
for (var i = 0; i < rows.length; i++) {
var cols = rows[i].f;
data[i] = new Array(cols.length);
for (var j = 0; j < cols.length; j++) {
data[i][j] = cols[j].v;
}
}

// put array data into new Sheet
var spreadsheet = SpreadsheetApp.create(QUERY_NAME);
var sheet = spreadsheet.getActiveSheet();
var headers = queryResults.schema.fields;
sheet.appendRow(headers); // header row
sheet.getRange(START_ROW, START_COL,
rows.length, headers.length).setValues(data);

// return Sheet object for later use
return spreadsheet;
}

It returns a handle to the new Google Sheet which we can then pass on to the next component: using Google Sheets to generate a Chart from the BigQuery data. Again leaving out the CONSTANTs, we have the 2nd part of our app, the createColumnChart() function:

function createColumnChart(spreadsheet) {
// create & put chart on 1st Sheet
var sheet = spreadsheet.getSheets()[0];
var chart = sheet.newChart()
.setChartType(Charts.ChartType.COLUMN)
.addRange(sheet.getRange(START_CELL + ':' + END_CELL))
.setPosition(START_ROW, START_COL, OFFSET, OFFSET)
.build();
sheet.insertChart(chart);

// return Chart object for later use
return chart;
}

The chart is returned by createColumnChart() so we can use that plus the Sheets object to build the desired slide presentation from Apps Script with Google Slides in the 3rd part of our app, the createSlidePresentation() function:

function createSlidePresentation(spreadsheet, chart) {
// create new deck & add title+subtitle
var deck = SlidesApp.create(QUERY_NAME);
var [title, subtitle] = deck.getSlides()[0].getPageElements();
title.asShape().getText().setText(QUERY_NAME);
subtitle.asShape().getText().setText('via GCP and G Suite APIs:\n' +
'Google Apps Script, BigQuery, Sheets, Slides');

// add new slide and insert empty table
var tableSlide = deck.appendSlide(SlidesApp.PredefinedLayout.BLANK);
var sheetValues = spreadsheet.getSheets()[0].getRange(
START_CELL + ':' + END_CELL).getValues();
var table = tableSlide.insertTable(sheetValues.length, sheetValues[0].length);

// populate table with data in Sheets
for (var i = 0; i < sheetValues.length; i++) {
for (var j = 0; j < sheetValues[0].length; j++) {
table.getCell(i, j).getText().setText(String(sheetValues[i][j]));
}
}

// add new slide and add Sheets chart to it
var chartSlide = deck.appendSlide(SlidesApp.PredefinedLayout.BLANK);
chartSlide.insertSheetsChart(chart);

// return Presentation object for later use
return deck;
}

Finally, we need a driver application that calls all three one after another, the createColumnChart() function:

function createBigQueryPresentation() {
var spreadsheet = runQuery();
var chart = createColumnChart(spreadsheet);
var deck = createSlidePresentation(spreadsheet, chart);
}

We left out some detail in the code above but hope this pseudocode helps kickstart your own project. Seeking a guided tutorial to building this app one step-at-a-time? Do our codelab at g.co/codelabs/bigquery-sheets-slides. Alternatively, go see all the code by hitting our GitHub repo at github.com/googlecodelabs/bigquery-sheets-slides. After executing the app successfully, you'll see the fruits of your big data analysis captured in a presentable way in a Google Slides deck:

This isn't the end of the story as this is just one example of how you can leverage both platforms from Google Cloud. In fact, this was one of two sample apps featured in our Cloud NEXT '18 session this summer exploring interoperability between GCP & G Suite which you can watch here:

Stay tuned as more examples are coming. We hope these videos plus the codelab inspire you to build on your own ideas.

10 must-see G Suite developer sessions at Google Cloud Next ‘18

Posted by Wesley Chun (@wescpy), Developer Advocate, Google Cloud

Google Cloud Next '18 is only a few days away, and this year, there are over 500 sessions covering all aspects of cloud computing, from G Suite to the Google Cloud Platform. This is your chance to learn first-hand how to build custom solutions in G Suite alongside other developers from Independent Software Vendors (ISVs), systems integrators (SIs), and industry enterprises.

G Suite's intelligent productivity apps are secure, smart, and simple to use, so why not integrate your apps with them? If you're planning to attend the event and are wondering which sessions you should check out, here are some sessions to consider:

  • "Power Your Apps with Gmail, Google Drive, Calendar, Sheets, Slides, and More!" on Tuesday, July 24th. Join me as I lead this session that provides a high-level technical overview of the various ways you can build with G Suite. This is a great place to start before attending deeper technical sessions.
  • "Power your apps with Gmail, Google Drive, Calendar, Sheets, Slides and more" on Monday, July 23rd and Friday, July 27th. Join me for one of our half-day bootcamps! Both are identical and bookend the conference—one on Monday and another on Friday, meaning you can do either one and still make it to all the other conference sessions. While named the same as the technical overview above, the bootcamps dive a bit deeper and feature more detailed tech talks on Google Apps Script, the G Suite REST APIs, and App Maker. The three (or more!) hands-on codelabs will leave you with working code that you can start customizing for your own apps on the job! Register today to ensure you get a seat.
  • "Automating G Suite: Apps Script & Sheets Macro Recorder" and "Enhancing the Google Apps Script Developer Experience" both on Tuesday, July 24th. Interested in Google Apps Script, our customized serverless JavaScript runtime used to automate, integrate, and extend G Suite? The first session introduces developers and ITDMs to new features as well as real business use cases while the other dives into recent features that make Apps Script more friendly for the professional developer.
  • "G Suite + GCP: Building Serverless Applications with All of Google Cloud" on Wednesday, July 25th. This session is your chance to attend one of the few hybrid talks that look at how to you can build applications on both the GCP and G Suite platforms. Learn about serverless—a topic that's become more and more popular over the past year—and see examples on both platforms with a pair of demos that showcase how you can take advantage of GCP tools from a G Suite serverless app, and how you can process G Suite data driven by GCP serverless functions. I'm also leading this session and eager to show how you can leverage the strengths of each platform together in the same applications.
  • "Build apps your business needs, with App Maker" and "How to Build Enterprise Workflows with App Maker" on Tuesday, July 24th and Thursday, July 26th, respectively. Google App Maker is a new low-code, development environment that makes it easy to build custom apps for work. It's great for business analysts, technical managers, or data scientists who may not have software engineering resources. With a drag & drop UI, built-in templates, and point-and-click data modeling, App Maker lets you go from idea to app in minutes! Learn all about it with our pair of App Maker talks featuring our Developer Advocate, Chris Schalk.
  • "The Google Docs, Sheets & Slides Ecosystem: Stronger than ever, and growing" and "Building on the Docs Editors: APIs and Apps Script" on Wednesday, July 25th and Thursday, July 26th, respectively. Check out these pair of talks to learn more about how to write apps that integrate with the Google Docs editors (Docs, Sheets, Slides, Forms). The first describes the G Suite productivity tools' growing interoperability in the enterprise with while the second focuses on the different integration options available to developers, either using Google Apps Script or the REST APIs.
  • "Get Productive with Gmail Add-ons" on Tuesday, July 24th. We launched Gmail Add-ons less than a year ago to help developers integrate their apps alongside Gmail. Check out this video I made to help you get up-to-speed on Gmail Add-ons! This session is for developers either new to Gmail Add-ons or want to hear the latest from the Gmail Add-ons and API team.

I look forward to meeting you in person at Next '18. In the meantime, check out the entire session schedule to find out everything it has to offer. Don't forget to swing by our "Meet the Experts" office hours (Tue-Thu), G Suite "Collaboration & Productivity" showcase demos (Tue-Thu), the G Suite Birds-of-a-Feather meetup (Wed), and the Google Apps Script & G Suite Add-ons meetup (just after the BoF on Wed). I'm excited at how we can use "all the tech" to change the world. See you soon!

Google Search at I/O 2018

With the eleventh annual Google I/O wrapped up, it’s a great time to reflect on some of the highlights.

What we did at I/O


The event was a wonderful way to meet many great people from various communities across the globe, exchange ideas, and gather feedback. Besides many great web sessions, codelabs, and office hours we shared a few things with the community in two sessions specific to Search:




The sessions included the launch of JavaScript error reporting in the Mobile Friendly Test tool, dynamic rendering (we will discuss this in more detail in a future post), and an explanation of how CMS can use the Indexing and Search Console APIs to provide users with insights. For example, Wix lets their users submit their homepage to the index and see it in Search results instantly, and Squarespace created a Google Search keywords report to help webmasters understand what prospective users search for.

During the event, we also presented the new Search Console in the Sandbox area for people to try and were happy to get a lot of positive feedback, from people being excited about the AMP Status report to others exploring how to improve their content for Search.

Hands-on codelabs, case studies and more


We presented the Structured Data Codelab that walks you through adding and testing structured data. We were really happy to see that it ended up being one of the top 20 codelabs by completions at I/O. If you want to learn more about the benefits of using Structured Data, check out our case studies.



During the in-person office hours we saw a lot of interest around HTTPS, mobile-first indexing, AMP, and many other topics. The in-person Office Hours were a wonderful addition to our monthly Webmaster Office Hours hangout. The questions and comments will help us adjust our documentation and tools by making them clearer and easier to use for everyone.

Highlights and key takeaways


We also repeated a few key points that web developers should have an eye on when building websites, such as:


  • Indexing and rendering don’t happen at the same time. We may defer the rendering to a later point in time.
  • Make sure the content you want in Search has metadata, correct HTTP statuses, and the intended canonical tag.
  • Hash-based routing (URLs with "#") should be deprecated in favour of the JavaScript History API in Single Page Apps.
  • Links should have an href attribute pointing to a URL, so Googlebot can follow the links properly.

Make sure to watch this talk for more on indexing, dynamic rendering and troubleshooting your site. If you wanna learn more about things to do as a CMS developer or theme author or Structured Data, watch this talk.

We were excited to meet some of you at I/O as well as the global I/O extended events and share the latest developments in Search. To stay in touch, join the Webmaster Forum or follow us on Twitter, Google+, and YouTube.

 

Web Notifications API Support Now Available in FCM Send v1 API

Posted by Mertcan Mermerkaya, Software Engineer

We have great news for web developers that use Firebase Cloud Messaging to send notifications to clients! The FCM v1 REST API has integrated fully with the Web Notifications API. This integration allows you to set icons, images, actions and more for your Web notifications from your server! Better yet, as the Web Notifications API continues to grow and change, these options will be immediately available to you. You won't have to wait for an update to FCM to support them!

Below is a sample payload you can send to your web clients on Push API supported browsers. This notification would be useful for a web app that supports image posting. It can encourage users to engage with the app.

{
"message": {
"webpush": {
"notification": {
"title": "Fish Photos 🐟",
"body":
"Thanks for signing up for Fish Photos! You now will receive fun daily photos of fish!",
"icon": "firebase-logo.png",
"image": "guppies.jpg",
"data": {
"notificationType": "fishPhoto",
"photoId": "123456"
},
"click_action": "https://example.com/fish_photos",
"actions": [
{
"title": "Like",
"action": "like",
"icon": "icons/heart.png"
},
{
"title": "Unsubscribe",
"action": "unsubscribe",
"icon": "icons/cross.png"
}
]
}
},
"token": "<APP_INSTANCE_REGISTRATION_TOKEN>"
}
}

Notice that you are able to set new parameters, such as actions, which gives the user different ways to interact with the notification. In the example below, users have the option to choose from actions to like the photo or to unsubscribe.

To handle action clicks in your app, you need to add an event listener in the default firebase-messaging-sw.js file (or your custom service worker). If an action button was clicked, event.action will contain the string that identifies the clicked action. Here's how to handle the "like" and "unsubscribe" events on the client:

// Retrieve an instance of Firebase Messaging so that it can handle background messages.
const messaging = firebase.messaging();

// Add an event listener to handle notification clicks
self.addEventListener('notificationclick', function(event) {
if (event.action === 'like') {
// Like button was clicked

const photoId = event.notification.data.photoId;
like(photoId);
}
else if (event.action === 'unsubscribe') {
// Unsubscribe button was clicked

const notificationType = event.notification.data.notificationType;
unsubscribe(notificationType);
}

event.notification.close();
});

The SDK will still handle regular notification clicks and redirect the user to your click_action link if provided. To see more on how to handle click actions on the client, check out the guide.

Since different browsers support different parameters in different platforms, it's important to check out the browser compatibility documentation to ensure your notifications work as intended. Want to learn more about what the Send API can do? Check out the FCM Send API documentation and the Web Notifications API documentation. If you're using the FCM Send API and you incorporate the Web Notifications API in a cool way, then let us know! Find Firebase on Twitter at @Firebase, and Facebook and Google+ by searching "Firebase".

Google I/O 2018 – What sessions should SEOs and Webmasters watch live ?

Google I/O 2018 is starting today in California, to an international audience of 7,000+ developers. It will run until Thursday night. It is our annual developers festival, where product announcements are made, new APIs and frameworks are introduced, and Product Managers present the latest from Google.

However, you don't have to physically attend the event to take advantage of this once-a-year opportunity: many conferences and talks are live streamed on YouTube for anyone to watch. You will find the full-event schedule here.

Dozens upon dozens of talks will take place over the next 3 days. We have hand picked the talks that we think will be the most interesting for webmasters and SEO professionals. Each link shared will bring you to pages with more details about each talk, and you will find out how to tune in to the live stream. All times are California time (PCT). We might add other sessions to this list.


Tuesday, May 8th

3pm - Web Security post Spectre/Meltdown, with Emily Schechter and Chris Palmer - more info.
5pm - Dru Knox and Stephan Somogyi talk about building a seamless web with Chrome - more info.


Wednesday, May 9th

9.30am - Ewa Gasperowicz and Addy Osmani talk about Web Performance and increasing control over the loading experience - more info.
10.30am - Alberto Medina and Thierry Muller will explain how to make a WordPress site progressive - more info.
11.30am - Rob Dodson and Dominic Mazzoni will cover "What's new in web accessibility" - more info.
3.30pm - Michael Bleigh will introduce how to leverage AMP in Firebase for a blazing fast website - more info.
4.30pm - Rick Viscomi and Vinamrata Singal will introduce the latest with Lighthouse and Chrome UX Report for Web Performance - more info.


Thursday, May 10th

8.30am - John Mueller and Tom Greenaway will talk about building Search-friendly JavaScript websites - more info.
9.30am - Build e-commerce sites for the modern web with AMP, PWA, and more, with Adam Greenberg and Rowan Merewood - more info.
12.30pm - Session on "Building a successful web presence with Google Search" by John Mueller and Mariya Moeva - more info.



This list is only a sample of the content at this year's Google I/O, and there might be many more that are interesting to you! To find out about those other talks, check out the full list of web sessions, but also the sessions about Design, the Cloud sessions, the machine learning sessions, and more… 

We hope you can make the time to watch the talks online, and participate in the excitement of I/O ! The videos will also be available on Youtube after the event, in case you can't tune in live.


Posted by Vincent Courson, Search Outreach Specialist, and the Google Webmasters team

Gmail Add-ons framework now available to all developers

Originally posted by Wesley Chun, G Suite Developer Advocate on the G Suite Blog

Email remains at the heart of how companies operate. That's why earlier this year, we previewed Gmail Add-ons—a way to help businesses speed up workflows. Since then, we've seen partners build awesome applications, and beginning today, we're extending the Gmail add-on preview to include all developers. Now anyone can start building a Gmail add-on.

Gmail Add-ons let you integrate your app into Gmail and extend Gmail to handle quick actions.

They are built using native UI context cards that can include simple text dialogs, images, links, buttons and forms. The add-on appears when relevant, and the user is just a click away from your app's rich and integrated functionality.

Gmail Add-ons are easy to create. You only have to write code once for your add-on to work on both web and mobile, and you can choose from a rich palette of widgets to craft a custom UI. Create an add-on that contextually surfaces cards based on the content of a message. Check out this video to see how we created an add-on to collate email receipts and expedite expense reporting.

Per the video, you can see that there are three components to the app's core functionality. The first component is getContextualAddOn()—this is the entry point for all Gmail Add-ons where data is compiled to build the card and render it within the Gmail UI. Since the add-on is processing expense reports from email receipts in your inbox, the createExpensesCard()parses the relevant data from the message and presents them in a form so your users can confirm or update values before submitting. Finally, submitForm()takes the data and writes a new row in an "expenses" spreadsheet in Google Sheets, which you can edit and tweak, and submit for approval to your boss.

Check out the documentation to get started with Gmail Add-ons, or if you want to see what it's like to build an add-on, go to the codelab to build ExpenseItstep-by-step. While you can't publish your add-on just yet, you can fill out this form to get notified when publishing is opened. We can't wait to see what Gmail Add-ons you build!

Gmail add-ons framework now available to all developers



Email remains at the heart of how companies operate. That’s why earlier this year, we previewed Gmail Add-ons—a way to help businesses speed up workflows. Since then, we’ve seen partners build awesome applications, and beginning today, we’re extending the Gmail add-on preview to include all developers. Now anyone can start building a Gmail add-on.

Gmail Add-ons let you integrate your app into Gmail and extend Gmail to handle quick actions. They are built using native UI context cards that can include simple text dialogs, images, links, buttons and forms. The add-on appears when relevant, and the user is just a click away from your app's rich and integrated functionality.

Gmail Add-ons are easy to create. You only have to write code once for your add-on to work on both web and mobile, and you can choose from a rich palette of widgets to craft a custom UI. Create an add-on that contextually surfaces cards based on the content of a message. Check out this video to see how we created an add-on to collate email receipts and expedite expense reporting.

Per the video, you can see that there are three components to the app’s core functionality. The first component is getContextualAddOn()—this is the entry point for all Gmail Add-ons where data is compiled to build the card and render it within the Gmail UI. Since the add-on is processing expense reports from email receipts in your inbox, the createExpensesCard()parses the relevant data from the message and presents them in a form so your users can confirm or update values before submitting. Finally, submitForm() takes the data and writes a new row in an “expenses” spreadsheet in Google Sheets, which you can edit and tweak, and submit for approval to your boss.

Check out the documentation to get started with Gmail Add-ons, or if you want to see what it's like to build an add-on, go to the codelab to build ExpenseIt step-by-step. While you can't publish your add-on just yet, you can fill out this form to get notified when publishing is opened. We can’t wait to see what Gmail Add-ons you build!

Talk to Google at Node.js Interactive

We’re headed to Vancouver this week, with about 25 Googlers who are incredibly excited to attend Node.js Interactive. With a mix of folks working on Cloud, Chrome, and V8, we’re going to be giving demos and answering questions at the Google booth. 

A few of us are also going to be giving talks. Here’s a list of the talks Googlers will be giving at the conference, ranging from serverless Slack bots to JavaScript performance tuning.

Wednesday, October 4th

Keynote: Franzi Hinkelmann
9:40am - 10:00am, West Ballroom A
Franzi Hinkelmann, Software Engineer @ Google

Franzi is located in Munich, Germany where she works at Google on Chrome V8. Franzi, like James and Anna, is a member of the Node.js Core Technical Committee. She speaks across the globe on the topic of JavaScript virtual machines. She has a PhD in mathematics, but left academia to follow her true passion: writing code.

Franzi will discuss her perspective on Chrome V8 in Node.js, and what the Chrome V8 team is doing to continue to support Node.js. Want to know what the future of browser development looks like? This is a must-attend keynote.

Functionality Abuse: The Forgotten Class of Attacks
12:20pm - 12:50pm, West Ballroom A
Nwokedi Idika, Software Engineer @ Google

If you were given a magic wand that would remove all implementation flaws from your web application, would it be free of security problems? If it took you more five seconds to say “No!” (or if, worse, you said “Yes!”), then you’re the target audience for this talk. If you’re in the target audience, don’t fret, much of the security community is there with you. After this talk, attendees will understand why the answer to the aforementioned question is an emphatic “No!” and they will learn an approach to decrease their chance of failing to consider an important vector of attack for their current and future web applications.

High Performance JS in V8
5:20pm - 5:50pm, West Ballroom A
Peter Marshall, Software Engineer @ Google

This year, V8 launched Ignition and Turbofan, the new compiler pipeline that handles all JavaScript code generation. Previously, achieving high performance in Node.js meant catering to the oddities of our now-deprecated Crankshaft compiler. This talk covers our new code generation architecture - what makes it special, a bit about how it works, and how to write high performance code for the new V8 pipeline.

Thursday, October 5th

New DevTools Features for JavaScript
11:40am - 12:10pm, West Meeting Room 122
Yang Guo, Software Engineer @ Google

Ever since v8-inspector was moved to V8's repository, we have been working on a number of new features for DevTools, usable for both Chrome and Node.js. The talk will demonstrate code coverage, type profiling, and give a deep dive into how evaluating a code snippet in DevTools console works in V8.

Understanding and Debugging Memory Leaks in Your Node.js Applications
12:20pm - 12:50pm, West Meeting Room 122
Ali Sheikh, Software Engineer @ Google

Memory leaks are hard. This talk with introduce developers to what memory leaks are, how they can exist in a garbage collected language, the available tooling that can help them understand and isolate memory leaks in their code. Specifically it will talk about heap snapshots, the new sampling heap profiler in V8, and other various other tools available in the ecosystem.

Workshop: Serverless Bots with Node.js
2:20pm - 4:10pm, West Meeting Room 117
Bret McGowen, Developer Advocate @ Google
Amir Shevat, DevRel @ Slack

This talk will show you how to build both voice and chat bots using serverless technologies. Amir Shevat, Head of Developer Relations at Slack, has overseen 17K+ bots deployed on the platform. He will present a maturing model, as best practices, for enterprise bots covering all sorts of use cases ranging for devops, HR, and marketing. Alan Ho from Google Cloud will then show you how to use various serverless technologies to build these bots. He’ll give you a demo of Slack and Google Assistant bots incorporating Google’s latest serverless technology including Edge (API Management), CloudFunctions (Serverless Compute), Cloud Datastore, and API.ai.

Modules Modules Modules
3:00pm - 3:30pm, West Meeting Room 120
Myles Borins, Developer Advocate @ Google

ES Modules and Common JS go together like old bay seasoning and vanilla ice cream. This talk will dig into the inconsistencies of the two patterns, and how the Node.js project is dealing with reconciling the problem. The talk will look at the history of modules in the JavaScript ecosystem and the subtle difference between them. It will also skim over how ECMA-262 is standardized by the TC39, and how ES Modules were developed.

Keynote: The case for Node.js
4:50pm - 5:05pm, West Ballroom A
Justin Beckwith, Product Manager @ Google

Node.js has had a transformational effect on the way we build software. However, convincing your organization to take a bet on Node.js can be difficult. My personal journey with Node.js has included convincing a few teams to take a bet on this technology, and this community. Let’s take a look at the case for Node.js we made at Google, and how you can make the case to bring it to your organization.


We can’t wait to see everyone and have some great conversations. Feel free to reach out to us on Twitter @googlecloud, or request an invite to the Google Cloud Slack community and join the #nodejs channel.

By Justin Beckwith, Languages and Runtimes Team