Tag Archives: gsoc

Googlers on the road: Linux.conf.au 2018

It’s summer in Sydney and Linux.conf.au (LCA) 2018 is just a week away. LCA, an annual event that attracts people from all over the globe, including Googlers, runs January 22nd to 26th.

LCA is a cornerstone of the free and open source software (FOSS) community. It’s volunteer-run, administered by Linux Australia, and has been running since 1999. Despite its name, the conference program covers all things FOSS. The event is five days long and includes two days of miniconfs that make the program even more interesting.

The Google Open Source team is escaping “wintery” Northern California and will be hosting a Birds of a Feather (BoF) session and co-hosting an event with GDG Sydney, both focused on our student programs.

A few Googlers ended up with sessions in the program and one is running a miniconf:

Tuesday, January 23rd
All day     Create hardware with FPGAs, Linux and Python Miniconf hosted by Tim Ansell (sold out)
11:40am  Learn by Contributing to Open Source by Josh Simmons
5:15pm    Assembling a balsa-wood Raspberry Pi case by Josh Deprez

Wednesday, January 24th
3:50pm    Securing the Linux boot process by Matthew Garrett

Thursday, January 25th
12:25pm  Google Summer of Code and Google Code-in Birds of a Feather session
6:00pm    Google Summer of Code and Google Code-in Meetup with GDG Sydney

Friday, January 26th
11:40am  The State of Kernel Self-Protection by Kees Cook
1:40pm    QUIC: Replacing TCP for the Web by Jana Iyengar
2:35pm    The Web Is Dead! Long Live The Web! by Sam Thorogood

Not able to make the conference? They’ll be posting session recordings to YouTube afterwards, thanks in part to students who have worked on TimVideos, a suite of open source software and hardware for recording video, as part of Google Summer of Code.

Naturally, you will also find the Google Open Source team at other upcoming events including FOSDEM. We look forward to seeing you in 2018!

By Josh Simmons, Google Open Source

Seeking open source projects for Google Summer of Code 2018

Do you lead or represent a free or open source software organization? Are you seeking new contributors? (Who isn’t?) Do you enjoy the challenge and reward of mentoring new developers? Apply to be a mentor organization for Google Summer of Code 2018!

We are seeking open source projects and organizations to participate in the 14th annual Google Summer of Code (GSoC). GSoC is a global program that gets student developers contributing to open source. Each student spends three months working on a project, with the support of volunteer mentors, for participating open source organizations.

Last year 1,318 students worked with 198 open source organizations. Organizations include individual projects and umbrella organizations that serve as fiscal sponsors, such as Apache Software Foundation or the Python Software Foundation.

You can apply starting today. The deadline to apply is January 23 at 16:00 UTC. Organizations chosen for GSoC 2018 will be posted on February 12.

Please visit the program site for more information on how to apply, a detailed timeline of important deadlines and general program information. We also encourage you to check out the Mentor Guide and join the discussion group.

Best of luck to all of the applicants!

By Josh Simmons, Google Open Source

Google Summer of Code 2017 Mentor Summit

This year Google brought over 320 mentors from all over the world (33 countries!) to Google's offices in Sunnyvale, California for the 2017 Google Summer of Code Mentor Summit. This year 149 organizations were represented, which provided the perfect opportunity to meet like-minded open source enthusiasts and discuss ways to make open source better and more sustainable.
Group photo by Dmitry Levin used under a CC BY-SA 4.0 license.
The Mentor Summit is run as an unconference in which attendees create and join sessions based on their interests. “I liked the unconference sessions, that they were casual and discussion based and I got a lot out of them. It was the place I connected with the most people,” said Cassie Tarakajian, attending on behalf of the Processing Foundation.

Attendees quickly filled the schedule boards with interesting sessions. One theme in this year’s session schedule was the challenging topic of failing students. Derk Ruitenbeek, part of the phpBB contingent, had this to say:
“This year our organisation had a high failure rate of 3 out of 5 accepted students. During the Mentor Summit I attended multiple sessions about failing students and rating proposals and got a lot [of] useful tips. Talking with other mentors about this really helped me find ways to improve student selection for our organisation next time.”
This year was the largest Mentor Summit ever – with the exception of our 10 Year Reunion in 2014 – and had the best gender diversity yet. Katarina Behrens, a mentor who worked with LibreOffice, observed:
“I was pleased to see many more women at the summit than last time I participated. I'm also beyond happy that now not only women themselves, but also men engage in increasing (not only gender) diversity of their projects and teams.”
We've held the Mentor Summit for the past 10+ years as a way to meet some of the thousands of mentors whose generous work for the students makes the program successful, and to give some of them and the projects they represent a chance to meet. This year was their first Mentor Summit for 52% of the attendees, giving us a lot of fresh perspectives to learn from!

We love hosting the Mentor Summit and attendees enjoy it, as well, especially the opportunity to meet each other. In fact, some attendees met in person for the first time at the Mentor Summit after years of collaborating remotely! According to Aveek Basu, who mentored for The Linux Foundation, the event was an excellent opportunity for “networking with like minded people from different communities. Also it was nice to know about people working in different fields from bioinformatics to robotics, and not only hard core computer science.” 

You can browse the event website and read through some of the session notes that attendees took to learn a bit more about this year’s Mentor Summit.

Now that Google Summer of Code 2017 and the Mentor Summit have come to a close, our team is busy gearing up for the 2018 program. We hope to see you then!

By Maria Webb, Google Open Source 

Google Summer of Code turns 14

Google Open Source is proud to announce the 14th year of Google Summer of Code (GSoC)! Yes, GSoC is officially well into its teenage years - hopefully without that painful awkward stage - and we are excited to introduce more new student developers to the world of open source software development.

Over the last 13 years GSoC has provided over 13,000 university students from around the world with an opportunity to hone their skills by contributing to open source projects during their summer break. Participants gain invaluable experience working directly with mentors on open source projects, and earn a stipend upon successful completion of their project.

We’re excited to keep the tradition going! Applications for interested open source organizations open on January 4, 2018 and student applications open in March*.

Are you an open source project interesting in learning more? Visit the program site to learn about what it means to be a mentor organization and how to submit a good application. We welcome all types of organizations - both large and small - and each year about 20% of the organizations we accept are completely new to GSoC.

Students, it’s never too early to start thinking about your proposal. You can check out the organizations that participated in Google Summer of Code 2017 as well as the projects students worked on. We also encourage you to explore other resources like the student and mentor guides and frequently asked questions.

You can always learn more on the program website. Please stay tuned for more details!

By Mary Radomile, Google Open Source

* Exact dates will be announced later this year.

Google Summer of Code 2017 Student Curtain Call

Back in early May we announced the students accepted into the 13th edition of the Google Summer of Code (GSoC) program, our largest program ever! Today we are pleased to announce the 1,128 (86.2%*) students from 68 countries that successfully completed the 2017 GSoC. Great job, students!





Students worked diligently with 201 open source organizations and over 1,600 mentors to learn to work with internationally distributed online teams, write great code and help their mentoring org enhance, extend and refine their codebases. Students have also become an important part of these communities. We feel strongly that to keep open source organizations thriving and evolving, they need new ideas - GSoC students help to bring fresh perspectives to these important projects.

We look forward to seeing even more from the 2017 students. Many will go on to become GSoC mentors in future programs and many more will become committers to these and other open source organizations. Some may even create their own open source projects! These students have a bright future ahead of them in technology and open source.

Interested in what the students worked on this summer? Check out their work as well as statistics on past programs.

A big thank you to our mentors and organization administrators who make this program possible. Their dedication to welcoming new student contributors into their communities and teaching them the fundamentals of open source is awesome and inspiring. Thank you all!

Congratulations to all of the GSoC 2017 students and the mentors who made this our biggest and best Google Summer of Code yet.

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

* 1,309 students started the coding period on May 30th, stats are based upon that number.

The Mentors of Google Summer of Code 2017

Every year, we pore over oodles of data to extract the most interesting and relevant statistics about the Google Summer of Code (GSoC) mentors. Mentors are the bread and butter of our program - without their hard work and dedication, there would be no GSoC. These volunteers spend 12 weeks (plus a month of community bonding) tirelessly guiding their students to create the best quality project possible and welcoming them into their communities - answering questions and providing help at all hours.

Here’s a quick snapshot of our 2017 group:
  • Total mentors: 3,439
  • Mentors assigned to an active project: 1,647
  • Mentors who have participated in GSoC over 10 years: 22
  • Percentage of new mentors: 49%
GSoC 2017 mentors are a worldly group, hailing from 69 countries on 6 continents - we’re still waiting on a mentor from Antarctica… Anyone?

Interested in the data? Check out the full list of countries.
Some interesting factoids about our mentors:
  • Average age: 39
  • Youngest: 15*
  • Oldest: 68
  • Most common first name: Michael (there are 40!)
GSoC mentors help to introduce the next generation to the world of open source software development — for that we are very grateful. To show our appreciation, we invite two mentors from each of the 201 participating organizations to attend the annual mentor summit at the Google campus in Sunnyvale, California. It’s three days of food, community building, lively debate and lots of fun.

Thank you to everyone involved in Google Summer of Code. Cheers to yet another great year!

By Mary Radomile, Google Open Source

* Say what? 15 years old!? Yep! We had 12 GSoC mentors under the age of 18. This group of enthusiastic teens started their journey in our sister program, Google Code-in, an open source coding competition for 13-17 year olds. You can read more about it at g.co/gci.

Google Summer of Code 2017 statistics part 2

Now that Google Summer of Code (GSoC) 2017 is under way with students in their first full week of the coding period we wanted to bring you some more statistics on the 2017 program. Lots and lots of numbers follow:

Organizations

Students are working with 201 organizations (the most we’ve ever had!) of which 39 are participating in GSoC for the first time.

Student Registrations

Over 20,651 students from 144 countries registered for the program, which is an 8.8% increase over the previous high for the program.

Project Proposals

4,764 students from 108 countries submitted a total of 7,089 project proposals.

Gender breakdown

11.4% of accepted students are women. We are always interested in making our programs and open source more inclusive. Please contact us if you know of organizations we should work with to spread the word about GSoC to underrepresented groups.

Universities

The 1,318 students accepted into the GSoC 2017 program hailed from 575 universities, of which 142 have students participating for the first time in GSoC.

Top 10 schools by students accepted for GSoC 2017 

University Name Country Accepted Students
International Institute of Information Technology, Hyderabad India 39
Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani (BITS Pilani) India 37
Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur India 31
University of Moratuwa Sri Lanka 24
Delhi Technological University India 23
Birla Institute of Technology and Science Pilani, Goa Campus India 18
Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee India 18
Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay India 15
LNM Institute of Information Technology India 15
TU Munich/Technische Universität München Germany 14

Another post with stats on our GSoC mentors will be coming soon!

Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

Google Summer of Code 2017 statistics: Part one

Since 2005 Google Summer of Code (GSoC) has been bringing new developers into the open source community every year. GSoC 2017 is the largest to date with 1,318 students from 72 countries accepted into the program who are working with a record 201 open source organizations this summer.

Students are currently participating in the Community Bonding phase of the program where they become familiar with the open source communities they will be working with. They also spend time learning the codebase and the community’s best practices so they can start their 12 week coding projects on May 30th.

Each year we like to share program statistics as we see GSoC continue to expand all over the world. This year there are three students that are the first to be accepted into GSoC from their home countries: Qatar, Tajikistan and Zimbabwe. A complete list of accepted students and their countries is below:

Country Students Country Students Country Students
Argentina 3 Ghana 1 Qatar 1
Armenia 1 Greece 29 Romania 11
Australia 6 Hungary 6 Russian Federation 54
Austria 13 India 569 Saudi Arabia 1
Bangladesh 2 Indonesia 2 Serbia 3
Belarus 3 Ireland 5 Singapore 10
Belgium 6 Israel 2 Slovak Republic 6
Bosnia and Herzegovina 1 Italy 23 Slovenia 2
Brazil 21 Jamaica 1 South Africa 2
Bulgaria 4 Japan 13 South Korea 8
Cameroon 8 Kazakhstan 1 Spain 19
Canada 27 Kenya 1 Sri Lanka 54
China 49 Latvia 1 Sweden 8
Colombia 1 Lithuania 2 Switzerland 5
Costa Rica 1 Macedonia 1 Taiwan 1
Croatia 1 Mexico 1 Tajikistan 1
Czech Republic 6 Moldova 1 Turkey 11
Denmark 2 Netherlands 14 Ukraine 12
Ecuador 2 New Zealand 1 United Arab Emirates 1
Egypt 10 Nigeria 1 United Kingdom 16
Estonia 1 Pakistan 8 United States 126
Finland 4 Peru 1 Uruguay 1
France 20 Poland 19 Vietnam 4
Germany 55 Portugal 10 Zimbabwe 1

In our next GSoC statistics post we will delve deeper into the schools, gender breakdown, mentors and registration numbers for the 2017 program.

Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

Students, Start Your Engineerings!


It’s that time again! Our 201 mentoring organizations have selected 1,318 the students they look forward to working with during the 13th Google Summer of Code (GSoC). Congratulations to our 2017 students and a big thank you to everyone who applied!

The next step for participating students is the Community Bonding period which runs from May 4th through May 30th. During this time, students will get up to speed on the culture and toolset of their new community. They’ll also get acquainted with their mentor and learn more about the languages or tools they will need to complete their projects. Coding commences May 30th.

To the more than 4,200 students who were not chosen this year - don’t be discouraged! Many students apply at least once to GSoC before being accepted. You can improve your odds for next time by contributing to the open source project of your choice directly; organizations are always eager for new contributors! Look around GitHub and elsewhere on the internet for a project that interests you and get started.

Happy coding, everyone!

By Cat Allman, Google Open Source

Saddle up and meet us in Texas for OSCON 2017

Program chairs at OSCON 2016, left to right:
Kelsey Hightower, Scott Hanselman, Rachel Roumeliotis.
Photo used with permission from O'Reilly Media.
The Google Open Source team is getting ready to hit the road and join the open source panoply that is Open Source Convention (OSCON). This year the event runs May 8-11 in Austin, Texas and is preceded on May 6-7 by the free-to-attend Community Leadership Summit (CLS).

You’ll find our team and many other Googlers throughout the week on the program schedule and in the expo hall at booth #401. We’ve got a full rundown of our schedule below, but you can swing by the expo hall anytime to discuss Google Cloud Platform, our open source outreach programs, the projects we’ve open-sourced including Kubernetes, TensorFlow, gRPC, and even our recently released open source documentation.

Of course, you’ll also find our very own Kelsey Hightower everywhere since he is serving as one of three OSCON program chairs for the second year in a row.

Are you a student, educator, project maintainer, community leader, past or present participant in Google Summer of Code or Google Code-in? Join us for lunch at the Google Summer of Code table in the conference lunch area on Wednesday afternoon. We’ll discuss our outreach programs which help open source communities grow while providing students with real world software development experience. We’ll be updating this blog post and tweeting with details closer to the date.

Without further ado, here’s our schedule of events:

Monday, May 8th (Tutorials)

Tuesday, May 9th (Tutorials)

Wednesday, May 10th (Sessions)
12:30pm Google Summer of Code and Google Code-in lunch

Thursday, May 11th (Sessions)

We look forward to seeing you deep in the heart of Texas at OSCON 2017!

By Josh Simmons, Google Open Source