Tag Archives: gsoc

Google Summer of Code 2017 Student Curtain Call

Back in early May we announced the students accepted into the 13th edition of the Google Summer of Code (GSoC) program, our largest program ever! Today we are pleased to announce the 1,128 (86.2%*) students from 68 countries that successfully completed the 2017 GSoC. Great job, students!





Students worked diligently with 201 open source organizations and over 1,600 mentors to learn to work with internationally distributed online teams, write great code and help their mentoring org enhance, extend and refine their codebases. Students have also become an important part of these communities. We feel strongly that to keep open source organizations thriving and evolving, they need new ideas - GSoC students help to bring fresh perspectives to these important projects.

We look forward to seeing even more from the 2017 students. Many will go on to become GSoC mentors in future programs and many more will become committers to these and other open source organizations. Some may even create their own open source projects! These students have a bright future ahead of them in technology and open source.

Interested in what the students worked on this summer? Check out their work as well as statistics on past programs.

A big thank you to our mentors and organization administrators who make this program possible. Their dedication to welcoming new student contributors into their communities and teaching them the fundamentals of open source is awesome and inspiring. Thank you all!

Congratulations to all of the GSoC 2017 students and the mentors who made this our biggest and best Google Summer of Code yet.

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

* 1,309 students started the coding period on May 30th, stats are based upon that number.

The Mentors of Google Summer of Code 2017

Every year, we pore over oodles of data to extract the most interesting and relevant statistics about the Google Summer of Code (GSoC) mentors. Mentors are the bread and butter of our program - without their hard work and dedication, there would be no GSoC. These volunteers spend 12 weeks (plus a month of community bonding) tirelessly guiding their students to create the best quality project possible and welcoming them into their communities - answering questions and providing help at all hours.

Here’s a quick snapshot of our 2017 group:
  • Total mentors: 3,439
  • Mentors assigned to an active project: 1,647
  • Mentors who have participated in GSoC over 10 years: 22
  • Percentage of new mentors: 49%
GSoC 2017 mentors are a worldly group, hailing from 69 countries on 6 continents - we’re still waiting on a mentor from Antarctica… Anyone?

Interested in the data? Check out the full list of countries.
Some interesting factoids about our mentors:
  • Average age: 39
  • Youngest: 15*
  • Oldest: 68
  • Most common first name: Michael (there are 40!)
GSoC mentors help to introduce the next generation to the world of open source software development — for that we are very grateful. To show our appreciation, we invite two mentors from each of the 201 participating organizations to attend the annual mentor summit at the Google campus in Sunnyvale, California. It’s three days of food, community building, lively debate and lots of fun.

Thank you to everyone involved in Google Summer of Code. Cheers to yet another great year!

By Mary Radomile, Google Open Source

* Say what? 15 years old!? Yep! We had 12 GSoC mentors under the age of 18. This group of enthusiastic teens started their journey in our sister program, Google Code-in, an open source coding competition for 13-17 year olds. You can read more about it at g.co/gci.

Google Summer of Code 2017 statistics part 2

Now that Google Summer of Code (GSoC) 2017 is under way with students in their first full week of the coding period we wanted to bring you some more statistics on the 2017 program. Lots and lots of numbers follow:

Organizations

Students are working with 201 organizations (the most we’ve ever had!) of which 39 are participating in GSoC for the first time.

Student Registrations

Over 20,651 students from 144 countries registered for the program, which is an 8.8% increase over the previous high for the program.

Project Proposals

4,764 students from 108 countries submitted a total of 7,089 project proposals.

Gender breakdown

11.4% of accepted students are women. We are always interested in making our programs and open source more inclusive. Please contact us if you know of organizations we should work with to spread the word about GSoC to underrepresented groups.

Universities

The 1,318 students accepted into the GSoC 2017 program hailed from 575 universities, of which 142 have students participating for the first time in GSoC.

Top 10 schools by students accepted for GSoC 2017 

University Name Country Accepted Students
International Institute of Information Technology, Hyderabad India 39
Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani (BITS Pilani) India 37
Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur India 31
University of Moratuwa Sri Lanka 24
Delhi Technological University India 23
Birla Institute of Technology and Science Pilani, Goa Campus India 18
Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee India 18
Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay India 15
LNM Institute of Information Technology India 15
TU Munich/Technische Universität München Germany 14

Another post with stats on our GSoC mentors will be coming soon!

Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

Google Summer of Code 2017 statistics: Part one

Since 2005 Google Summer of Code (GSoC) has been bringing new developers into the open source community every year. GSoC 2017 is the largest to date with 1,318 students from 72 countries accepted into the program who are working with a record 201 open source organizations this summer.

Students are currently participating in the Community Bonding phase of the program where they become familiar with the open source communities they will be working with. They also spend time learning the codebase and the community’s best practices so they can start their 12 week coding projects on May 30th.

Each year we like to share program statistics as we see GSoC continue to expand all over the world. This year there are three students that are the first to be accepted into GSoC from their home countries: Qatar, Tajikistan and Zimbabwe. A complete list of accepted students and their countries is below:

Country Students Country Students Country Students
Argentina 3 Ghana 1 Qatar 1
Armenia 1 Greece 29 Romania 11
Australia 6 Hungary 6 Russian Federation 54
Austria 13 India 569 Saudi Arabia 1
Bangladesh 2 Indonesia 2 Serbia 3
Belarus 3 Ireland 5 Singapore 10
Belgium 6 Israel 2 Slovak Republic 6
Bosnia and Herzegovina 1 Italy 23 Slovenia 2
Brazil 21 Jamaica 1 South Africa 2
Bulgaria 4 Japan 13 South Korea 8
Cameroon 8 Kazakhstan 1 Spain 19
Canada 27 Kenya 1 Sri Lanka 54
China 49 Latvia 1 Sweden 8
Colombia 1 Lithuania 2 Switzerland 5
Costa Rica 1 Macedonia 1 Taiwan 1
Croatia 1 Mexico 1 Tajikistan 1
Czech Republic 6 Moldova 1 Turkey 11
Denmark 2 Netherlands 14 Ukraine 12
Ecuador 2 New Zealand 1 United Arab Emirates 1
Egypt 10 Nigeria 1 United Kingdom 16
Estonia 1 Pakistan 8 United States 126
Finland 4 Peru 1 Uruguay 1
France 20 Poland 19 Vietnam 4
Germany 55 Portugal 10 Zimbabwe 1

In our next GSoC statistics post we will delve deeper into the schools, gender breakdown, mentors and registration numbers for the 2017 program.

Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

Students, Start Your Engineerings!


It’s that time again! Our 201 mentoring organizations have selected 1,318 the students they look forward to working with during the 13th Google Summer of Code (GSoC). Congratulations to our 2017 students and a big thank you to everyone who applied!

The next step for participating students is the Community Bonding period which runs from May 4th through May 30th. During this time, students will get up to speed on the culture and toolset of their new community. They’ll also get acquainted with their mentor and learn more about the languages or tools they will need to complete their projects. Coding commences May 30th.

To the more than 4,200 students who were not chosen this year - don’t be discouraged! Many students apply at least once to GSoC before being accepted. You can improve your odds for next time by contributing to the open source project of your choice directly; organizations are always eager for new contributors! Look around GitHub and elsewhere on the internet for a project that interests you and get started.

Happy coding, everyone!

By Cat Allman, Google Open Source

Saddle up and meet us in Texas for OSCON 2017

Program chairs at OSCON 2016, left to right:
Kelsey Hightower, Scott Hanselman, Rachel Roumeliotis.
Photo used with permission from O'Reilly Media.
The Google Open Source team is getting ready to hit the road and join the open source panoply that is Open Source Convention (OSCON). This year the event runs May 8-11 in Austin, Texas and is preceded on May 6-7 by the free-to-attend Community Leadership Summit (CLS).

You’ll find our team and many other Googlers throughout the week on the program schedule and in the expo hall at booth #401. We’ve got a full rundown of our schedule below, but you can swing by the expo hall anytime to discuss Google Cloud Platform, our open source outreach programs, the projects we’ve open-sourced including Kubernetes, TensorFlow, gRPC, and even our recently released open source documentation.

Of course, you’ll also find our very own Kelsey Hightower everywhere since he is serving as one of three OSCON program chairs for the second year in a row.

Are you a student, educator, project maintainer, community leader, past or present participant in Google Summer of Code or Google Code-in? Join us for lunch at the Google Summer of Code table in the conference lunch area on Wednesday afternoon. We’ll discuss our outreach programs which help open source communities grow while providing students with real world software development experience. We’ll be updating this blog post and tweeting with details closer to the date.

Without further ado, here’s our schedule of events:

Monday, May 8th (Tutorials)

Tuesday, May 9th (Tutorials)

Wednesday, May 10th (Sessions)
12:30pm Google Summer of Code and Google Code-in lunch

Thursday, May 11th (Sessions)

We look forward to seeing you deep in the heart of Texas at OSCON 2017!

By Josh Simmons, Google Open Source

Google Summer of Code 2017 student applications are open!

Are you a university student looking to learn more about open source software development? Consider applying to Google Summer of Code (GSoC) for a chance to spend your break coding on an open source project.

vertical GSoC logo.jpg


For the 13th straight year GSoC will give students from around the world the opportunity to learn the ins and outs of open source software development while working from their home. Students will receive a stipend for their successful contributions to allow them to focus on their coding during the program.

Mentors are paired with the students to help address technical questions and to monitor their progress throughout the program. Former GSoC participants have told us that the real-world experience they’ve gained during the program has not only sharpened their technical skills, but has also boosted their confidence, broadened their professional network and enhanced their resumes.

Interested students can submit proposals on the program site now through Monday, April 3 at 16:00 UTC. The first step is to search through the 201 open source organizations and review the “Project ideas” for the organizations that appeal to you. Next, reach out to the organizations to introduce yourself and determine if your skills and interests are a good match with their organization.




Since spots are limited, we recommend writing a strong project proposal and submitting a draft early to receive feedback from the organization which will help increase your chances of selection. Our Student Manual, written by former students and mentors, provides excellent helpful advice to get you started with choosing an organization and crafting a great proposal.

For information throughout the application period and beyond, visit the Google Open Source Blog, join our Google Summer of Code discussion lists or join us on Internet Relay Chat (IRC) at #gsoc on Freenode. Be sure to read the Program Rules, Timeline and FAQ, all available on the program site, for more information about Google Summer of Code.

Good luck to all the open source coders who apply, and remember to submit your proposals early — you only have until Monday, April 3 at 16:00 UTC!

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Summer of Code Program Manager

Getting ready for Google Summer of Code 2017

Spring is just around the corner here in the Northern Hemisphere and Google Summer of Code is fast approaching. If you are a student interested in participating this year, now is the time to prepare -- read on for tips on how to get ready.

This year we’ve accepted 201 open source organizations into the program, nearly 40 of which are new to the program. The organizations cover a wide range of topics including (but certainly not limited to!):

  • Operating systems
  • Web application frameworks
  • Healthcare and bioinformatics
  • Music and graphic design
  • Machine learning
  • Robotics
  • Security




How should you prepare for Google Summer of Code?

While student applications don’t open until March 20th at 16:00 UTC, you need to decide which projects you’re interested in and what you’ll propose. You should also communicate with those projects to learn more before you apply.

Start by looking at the list of participating projects and organizations. You can explore by searching for specific names or technologies, or filtering by topics you are interested in. Follow the “Learn More” link through to each organization’s page for additional information.

Once you’ve identified the organizations that you’re interested in, take a look at their ideas list to get a sense of the specific projects you could work on. Typically, you will choose a project from that list and write a proposal based on that idea, but you could also propose something that’s not on that list.

You should reach out to the organizations after you’ve decided what you want to work on. Doing this can make the difference between a good application and a great application.

Whatever you do, don’t wait until March 20th to begin preparing for Google Summer of Code! History has shown that students who reach out to organizations before the start of the application period have a higher chance of being accepted into the program, as they have had more time to talk to the organizations and understand what they are looking for with the project.

If you have any questions along the way, take a look at the Student Manual, FAQ and Timeline. If you can’t find the answer to your question, try taking your question to the mailing list.

By Josh Simmons, Open Source Programs Office

Introducing the Google Summer of Code 2017 Mentor Organizations

Today’s the day! We are excited to announce the mentor organizations accepted for this year’s Google Summer of Code (GSoC). Every year we receive more applications than we can accept and 2017 was no exception. After carefully reviewing almost 400 applications, we have chosen 201 open source projects and organizations, 18% of which are new to the program. Please see the program website for a complete list of the accepted organizations.

Interested in participating as a student? We will begin accepting student applications on Monday, March 20, 2017 at 16:00 UTC and the deadline is Monday, April 3, 2017 at 16:00 UTC.

Over the next three weeks, students who’d like to participate in Google Summer of Code should research the organizations and their Ideas Lists to explore which organizations are a good fit for their interests and skills and learn how they might contribute. Some of the most successful proposals have been completely new ideas submitted by students, so if you don’t see a project that appeals to you, don’t hesitate to suggest a new idea to the organization! There are contacts listed for each organization on their Ideas List — students should contact the organization directly to discuss their ideas. We also strongly encourage all interested students to reach out to and become familiar with the organization before applying.

You can find more information on our website, including a full timeline of important dates and program milestones. We also highly recommend all interested students read the Student Manual, FAQ and the Program Rules.

Congratulations to all of our mentor organizations! We look forward to working with all of you during Google Summer of Code 2017.

By Josh Simmons, Open Source Programs Office

Google Summer of Code 2016 wrap-up: LabLua

This is the final guest post from the students, mentors and organization administrators that participated in Google Summer of Code (GSoC) 2016. We’ve seen recaps of student work and lessons learned, which you can check out the rest of the series as we gear up for this year’s program.


LabLua is a lab at PUC-Rio dedicated to research on programming languages, with emphasis on the Lua language. Lua is a powerful, fast, lightweight, embeddable scripting language that is used in many industrial applications, and on many embedded systems and games.

We were very happy to participate in Google Summer of Code (GSoC) for the third time, and to mentor eight fine students that all completed their projects successfully. We thank them, and Google, for this extraordinary contribution to our research and development work.

Here is a brief summary of this year's projects:

Next Generation of the LuaRocks test suite - Robert Karasek
LuaRocks is the package manager for Lua modules. Its test suite was implemented as a big shell script that performed only black-box testing and ran only on Linux. The goal for this project was to port the test suite to Lua, improving its portability and allowing more types of tests so we could improve test coverage.

Robert ported the test suite to Lua using Busted. His new test suite, now merged into LuaRocks, runs on Linux and Mac OS X, accessible via Travis CI, as well as Windows, accessible via AppVeyor. 

This was a welcome addition, bringing greater confidence to developers. Robert improved the checks in existing tests and wrote many new ones, including a new mock-server for testing a client API for uploading packages to the repository.

Typed Lua Typechecker - Tomasz Dyczek 

Typed Lua provides static type checking for the Lua language. Typed Lua extends the syntax of Lua 5.3 to introduce type annotations, and performs local type inference for more precise detection of unannotated expressions.

Tomasz implemented the core of Typed Lua in Haskell. Tomasz's implementation parses code written in a syntax close to the abstract syntax of Typed Lua, then type checks the generated AST. Besides providing a support for testing and reasoning about new features, Tomasz's typechecker can be also used to validate tests to be included in Typed Lua's test suite.

Classes and Generics for Typed Lua - Kevin Clancy

Kevin worked on the implementation of a class system for Typed Lua. He also added parametric polymorphism (generics) for classes and existing Typed Lua types, such as functions and tables.

Kevin's work currently lives in its own branch, but will be merged into the main branch soon. Meanwhile, Kevin has written a detailed post explaining all the features he implemented

Improving Error Reporting in PEG Parsers - Matthew Allen Go 

LPegLabel is an extension of LPeg, a pattern matching tool for Lua, based on Parsing Expression Grammars (PEGs). LPegLabel supports labeled failures, a facility that improves error reporting and recovery for PEG-based parsers.

The goal of this project was to use LPegLabel to write parsers with good error reporting. These parsers could then be used by the Lua community and also serve as a guide for LPegLabel users. Because LPegLabel is a young tool, another important contribution was to improve the tool's usability.

Matthew achieved both goals. He developed a parser for Lua 5.3, which has been incorporated into the new release of lua-parser (1.0.0), and improved LPegLabel’s usability with work on its API and documentation.

Improving elasticsearch-lua tests and build - Dhaval Kapil

Elasticsearch is a distributed and scalable search engine written in Java that offers a REST API accessed through JSON. During GSoC 2015, Dhaval implemented elasticsearch-lua, a client for the Lua language following a model similar to clients written in Python and PHP.

During GSoC 2016, Dhaval worked on improving elasticsearch-lua. He added a test suite, documented the entire codebase, and updated the current client to work with the newest version of Elasticsearch.

Dhaval went above and beyond, creating a new library called luaver. This work was motivated by having to frequently switch between different versions of Lua while developing the test suite. A full blog post about his project can be found here.

Admin Center and Elasticsearch integration for Sailor - Nikhil Ramesh 

Sailor is a web framework with a model-view-controller (MVC) architecture. Like other web frameworks, such as Ruby on Rails and Django, it is designed to make development faster by making some assumptions and conventions and encouraging principles like Don’t Repeat Yourself (DRY).

Nikhil focused on extending Sailor. The first feature he worked on was an Admin Center, which is a web interface for configuring an application. He also integrated Sailor and elasticsearch-lua, allowing Elasticsearch indexes to be stored as Sailor Models. His work is currently pending as a pull request and will soon be merged.

Extending the online tutorial of Céu with Emscripten and SDL - Margarit Vicentiu

Céu is a language for developing reactive applications such as video games and embedded systems. Its compiler generates output in plain C to integrate easily with the underlying platform (e.g. Arduino, SDL). For this project, we wanted to integrate Céu with Emscripten in order to run applications in a web browser.

Vicentiu started with Céu’s online tutorial, which is a server-side application: the user types code in a text area and hits the send button; the server receives the code, executes it, and sends the output back to the user. During the summer, Vicentiu made most of the examples compile with Emscripten and run in real-time on the user’s screen.

Our next goal is to make the graphical examples with user interactions also work in the browser, and Vicentiu plans to continue contributing to the project to achieve this goal.

An automatic generator of WSDL documents for LuaSOAP - Victor Dias

LuaSOAP is a library for working with the Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP). WSDL is an XML format for describing network services; it is used to describe operations, messages and types offered by Web Services.

This summer Victor extended LuaSOAP's WSDL support by building a software layer for the automatic generation of WSDL documents. This new layer eases the description of most WSDL "bureaucracy" -- types, operations, ports, messages -- which have no counterparts in Lua. He also improved the test suite and the documentation. Victor's work will be integrated into the next version of LuaSOAP.

By Ana Lúcia de Moura, Organization Administrator for LabLua