Tag Archives: google cloud

How m.Paani seeks to boost 60 million Indian retailers

There are more than 60 million family-owned local businesses in India, that drive more than 90 percent of retail in the country. They also account for more than 40 percent of local employment.  Until recently, these retailers have enjoyed a consistent customer base for generations with little competition. Now, a billion Indians are coming online and there is a new digitally-driven Indian consumer to serve. With competition from new formats from e-commerce to big box stores, local retailers are presented with a new set of challenges that could put many of them out of business and leave a large portion of the population unemployed. 

Akanksha Hazari Ericson is using technology to provide a solution. The vast majority of local merchants in India are not digitized in any way. Akanksha’s startup, m.Paani, is empowering them with the tools to survive and thrive. The startup is currently working in India, and eventually plans to expand across other emerging markets. m.Paani was recently part of Google Developers Launchpad Accelerator, a program that supports startups with access to Google technology, mentorship, and network. 

From running seven acceleration programs around the world and supporting 341 startup founders, Launchpad has seen firsthand how global entrepreneurs are using technology and innovation to solve the world’s biggest problems. As part of our “Ideas to Reality” spotlight series, we caught up with Akanksha to talk about her journey in starting m.Paani and where she sees the company going over the next few years.

When did you realize your mission to help local retailers? 

I got the entrepreneurial bug when I successfully built and grew my first venture at 21. I then decided that my next business would be built in India, contributing to the country’s economic development, and eventually other emerging markets as well. In 2009, I returned to India after completing my masters at Cambridge to work in the intersection of tech and agriculture. I spent a year living in villages across the country, looking at how we can use technology to increase farmers’ incomes. This is when I also fell in love with the local businesses with which I interacted, and realized the critical role they play in our economy. The beginnings of m.Paani were born.

What is the first step you take when you turn your idea into a reality?

Understand and build a relationship with my customer. I moved to Mumbai, a city in which I had never lived and knew no one, with a presentation and a dream. Walking the local markets every day, I signed up and sold our product to our first 50 retailers and a few hundred consumers myself. I strongly believe that if you don’t know your customer directly and can’t sell your vision, solution or service to them at the beginning, then you are in no position to ask anyone else to do so.

Are there Google products you are using and would recommend to other startup founders?

Yes, three core products help us run our business. First, we’re hosted on Google Cloud. Next, we’re using Firebase for event tracking, testing and marketing. We love the flexibility that Firebase gives us to keep being nimble. Finally, we use Google Analytics, which is an absolute must for any business and a pivotal part of each day.

Tell us more about your experience in Launchpad Accelerator. 

If you have to learn, you might as well learn from the best. Launchpad has given us great insights, especially in machine learning. The one-to-one mentorship session with Peter Norvig, Google’s machine learning director, was a standout moment for our team. The entire experience was truly enriching and would recommend it to any entrepreneurs.

What advice do you have for future entrepreneurs?

Find a very very big, meaningful problem to solve. Something that has a deeper purpose for you, and makes our world a better place. It is more important than ever now that we all look to solve real problems in the world, from sustainability to economic empowerment. Don’t expect it to be glamorous—at all.  Expect it to be unfathomably hard, and expect yourself to be more tenacious and resilient than you have ever been. But trust me, because it is purpose-driven you will stay motivated, and if you stick with it until its solved, you will change the world. 

What is the most inspiring part of your work?

Our retailers. These are family businesses built over generations, in some cases. My favorite part of my job is meeting our customers and learning from them. The most meaningful part of any day is hearing and seeing first hand our positive impact on empowering, transforming and growing a local business. This, more than anything else, is what gets me and our whole team up and excited every morning. 

Cloud Covered: What was new with Google Cloud in August

Summer brought sunshine, swimming and vacations—along with some great stories from Google Cloud customers about what they’re doing with technology. As we pack away the beach towels, we’re bringing you some highlights from August.

Climb every (virtual) mountain.
Scaled any 10,000-foot mountains lately? We haven’t either, but we did enjoy this online climb of Zugspitze, Germany’s tallest mountain, powered by Google technology. Two web developers are using Google Maps Platform and custom Street View imagery to offer virtual tours up to the top. They took a ton of 360° photos while hiking up and down parts of Zugspitze, then set up the technology and used various APIs—like Street View Publish, Directions, Roads, and Street View Static—to create the experience. Check it out for beautiful views without sore legs.

See the hardware under the cloud hood.
Even though the cloud can seem like an ephemeral idea, somewhere there are hardware chips powering the apps you use. To run our internal services, Google uses a new type of processors from chipmaker AMD that are super powerful, and last month we announced that they’re coming to the data centers that power Google Cloud products. Customers using Google Cloud will be able to choose products using different sizes of these chips to get faster computing at a better price. 

Fill up your shopping cart, with help from cloud.
Google Cloud customers are using our technology to serve their users in lots of interesting ways. Macy’s uses Google Cloud to help provide customers with great online and in-person experiences, and has streamlined retail operations across its network with cloud technology. They also use Google Cloud’s data storage and analytics products at their new distribution center to help keep track of merchandise more efficiently.

Making a business run better is a big job.
This post offered a look at the tradeoffs that CIOs and CTOs have to make as they try to figure out which technology to use to make their businesses more modern. They want the latest tools to be able to serve customers with better apps and websites, but choosing what to use—and training employees how to use technology—can take a lot of work. A new McKinsey research report explains ways that these technology leaders can avoid the tradeoffs by choosing technology wisely, and by encouraging a change mindset for employees. 

As we bid farewell to summer, we’ve got lots of stories in the pipeline for fall. To stay up to date, check out the Google Cloud blog.

Cloud Covered: What was new with Google Cloud in July

July was a month for barbecue, ice cream and sunshine. Here at Google Cloud, we managed to squeeze in some of what we consider cloud computing fireworks, like a supercomputing record and new partner in bringing more storage options to businesses. 

The internet, under the sea
It’s easy to imagine all of what we do on the internet as just sort of floating around in the air. But there are actually thick cables under our oceans that carry data around the world, so we can get our email and web search results quickly. Google fully funds some cables, while others are shared. The new Equiano subsea cable will connect Europe and Africa once it’s done. It includes cool technological advances that give this cable 20 times the network capacity of the last one built to serve this region. 

G Suite gets even more security features
In Tokyo last month, we hosted another cloud conference where one of the big topics was security and how it works within our products. At the event, we announced that Google’s Advanced Protection Program now works with G Suite, so people whose data is at risk of online attack (think high-level executives) can be protected with help from IT. We also brought IT administrators new auto-alerts in their tools to help them see and prevent risky activity in their company. It’s powered by machine learning models.

Storing files is a big job
File storage enables businesses to store lots of files that users or apps need to access simultaneously. Of course, on a business scale, there can be thousands or millions of these files, so the underlying systems need to be able to handle that volume. Last month we announced that Elastifile is now a part of Google Cloud. Elastifile will be integrated with our Cloud Filestore product. This will help those managing large file systems to scale them quickly. 

Cloud beats not-cloud in machine learning benchmark 
Cloud TPU Pods are Google’s supercomputers built just for machine learning. They get faster in each generation of hardware—they’re now in v3—and set three new performance records last month in an industry benchmarking exercise. It used to be that this type of speed could only be achieved with on-premises systems, meaning hardware physically located and operated in a data center. Google Cloud is the only provider of public cloud technology that has been able to do these tasks faster than an on-premises system can. 

School’s not out for summer, after all
Cloud computing, like most things related to technology, is constantly changing. New concepts and products arrive regularly, and even the most experienced IT pros can learn new things. We offer lots of different classes and certificates, and just added a new class to our Google Cloud course catalog: theArchitecting with Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE) Specialization. It uses both lectures and hands-on labs to demonstrate how Kubernetes works. It’s a new way of organizing and managing all the information that lives in your cloud, so there’s a lot to learn about how it works and how to get started using it.

That’s all for July! Stay up to date with Google Cloud on our blog.

Babymigo: technology for Africa’s new parents

With infant mortality rates on the rise in Nigeria, mostly due to a lack of doctors in rural areas, entrepreneur Adeloye Olanrewaju wanted to see if he could use tech to figure out a solution. This led him to start Babymigo, an online community that connects expecting and new mothers to resources, doctors, experts and other services

Babymigo was recently part of Google Developers Launchpad Accelerator in Nigeria, a three-month program that provides mentorship and support to early-stage startups. With seven acceleration programs and 338 startup alumni, we at Launchpad have seen firsthand how global entrepreneurs are using technology and startup innovation to solve the world’s biggest problems. 

In a new spotlight series called “Ideas to Reality,” we aim to share the stories of these founders and their startups through videos and written case studies. In our first installment, we talk to Adeloye about why he started Babymigo, and where he hopes it will be in the next few years.

Adeloye Olanrewaju of Babymigo

Adeloye at a Google Developers Launchpad event.

When did you first come up with the idea for Babymigo?

My aunt lost her baby due to complications arising from childbirth. Those complications could have been avoided if she had access to the right healthcare information. Unfortunately, her story is not a unique one. 

Today in Nigeria, more than 7 million babies are born every year, but the country still has the third highest infant mortality rate in the world. To make matters worse, nearly 60,000 mothers lose their lives each year due to complications arising from childbirth. 

When I started my career working at a maternity clinic, I saw that the biggest problem mothers faced was poor access to verified health care professionals and healthcare information. I wanted to help and felt tech was my way to do it.  So I quit my job and started Babymigo, to use technology to solve these challenges. 

How does Babymigo use tech to combat infant mortality? 

We are the first and only platform that increases access to informed health decisions via SMS, an  app and a web portal. Our goal is to help expecting mothers get their questions answered by hyperlocal medical and child care experts. Today, our services have reached more than 100,000 users. We are looking to reach 1 million mothers by the end of 2020. 

What steps did you take to make bring your idea to life? 

I first found as many users as I could, and then conducted extensive research to better understand the problems they faced and what solutions they really needed. This saved us valuable time, allowing us to focus on the most important features our users wanted.

The Google Launchpad Accelerator was a big opportunity to diagnose our company. With the help of experts and experienced mentors, we were able to increase user growth and retention by about 20%. Being a part of Launchpad also brought us media exposure and significant investor interest. With Google supporting us, we saw a dramatic rise in the confidence of our investors and clients. 

Google products are at the center of building our platform. Through Firebase Cloud Messaging, we send notification messages to drive user retention.  We also use Google Analytics to better understand our customers, using its insights to take action, such as improving our website. 

Any advice for future entrepreneurs? 

Building a tech startup is a rollercoaster, so developing a strong mental resilience is key. Nothing can replace persistence.  Surround yourself with thinkers who push you. At Launchpad I had the chance to be challenged by my peers at every turn. Find a network that will guide you in the same way.

From the kitchen to the factory: Three surprising places you’ll find Chrome Enterprise

We talk a lot about how cloud-native devices like Chromebooks—which automatically update and store your work in the cloud—can help you stay productive at work. What you might not know is that businesses are using these devices in unexpected ways to keep their organizations on track, whether it’s cooking your favorite dish, making the factory floor more efficient, or bringing devices to ambulances for on-the-go emergency care. Here are three surprising examples of enterprises using Chromebooks and Chrome Enterprise to help employees be better trained, better informed, and better connected.

Panda Restaurant Group: cooking your favorite dishes perfectly, every time
When Panda Express customers order their favorite meals—such as the Original Orange Chicken, Broccoli Beef, and KungPao Chicken Breast—they expect the dish they know and love to be the same each time. That’s why in almost 400 locations, Panda Restaurant Group associates train employees on these recipes with the help of Chromebooks. “Chromebooks make it easier for new associates to complete e-modules and onboarding,” says Clark Yang, a training leader at a Panda Express in Los Angeles.

Royal Technologies: bringing the factory floor to the cloud, some assembly required
To give manufacturing managers on the factory floor an easier way to check parts quality, manufacturing company Royal Technologies placed Acer Chromebase CA24I devices on shop floors. As parts come off the assembly line, managers compare them to images on the Chromebase screen, then pack the parts for shipping. They can even generate quality-check reports by filling out a Google Form on the Chromebase and sharing results with customers via Google Sheets. “We’re not only keeping parts quality high,” says French Williams, IT Manager at Royal Technologies, “we’re also communicating more closely with our customers.”

Middlesex Hospital: equipping paramedics with tools to help patients, fast
When you’re treating a person who needs critical care, time is precious. Middlesex Hospital paramedics understand this intimately—they receive more than 10,000 emergency calls each year. The hospital uses Chromebooks to respond to these calls quickly, so that treatment can start within seconds after arriving on the scene. “Even though they’re built to withstand rough handling, they don’t weigh down our emergency packs,” says Jim Santacroce, Manager of Emergency Medical Services at Middlesex Hospital, of their Chromebooks. “Their battery life keeps pace with our long shifts. It takes no time at all to learn how to use Chrome OS on Chromebooks—and when you open them, they boot up almost immediately. We don’t need to watch the minutes tick away while we wait to open a patient record—especially in the high-pressure emergency environment.”

Whether responding to a 911 call or tracking patient care, healthcare providers at Middlesex Hospital rely on the flexibility and security of Chrome Enterprise to put the focus back on patients.

These are just a few examples of how businesses from different industries are using Chrome Enterprise to increase productivity, inspire collaboration, and better serve their customers. To find more stories like these, visit Chrome Enterprise on the Google Cloud blog.

Cloud Covered: What was new in Google Cloud in June

Summer’s here, but that's not the only big thing that arrived this month: We welcomed new partners and have new data technology-related updates to share. Read on for noteworthy Cloud updates in June.

Google will acquire Looker.
We announced our intent to acquire Looker, a company that offers business intelligence, data application, and embedded analytics software. These kinds of tools are important for modern businesses, so they can use all the data they have available to make decisions, and see visualizations of data with graphics and charts. Looker will help extend the analytics tools we already have at Google Cloud. It will let users at businesses define which metrics to use across different sources of data, so everyone can see the same information. Plus, Looker will bring strong analytics technology that can be embedded into other applications that a business is using.

A cloud data warehouse partner came on board.
Yes, data analytics is a big topic at Google Cloud these days. If you think about your own data use—photos and music, for example—you can start to get an idea of how much data exists for businesses. They want to analyze that data to understand more about what’s important to their business—but the sheer volume of data makes it challenging. Cloud data warehouses help to store, manage, and analyze all that data to find useful information. This month, we announced a partnership with data warehouse provider Snowflake, which will give people another way to bring in a wider variety of data sources to Google Cloud, then use and analyze all that data.

School’s out, but the learning never stops.
We announced a new Google Cloud certification challenge in June: Study, take an exam, get certified within 12 weeks, and you’ll get a $100 Google Store voucher. These certifications are becoming more important as employers recognize how important cloud skills are to their businesses, and there are different levels of certifications based on experience level. Plus, we announced some new Qwiklabs quests—self-paced labs designed to educate cloud developers. The quests help developers understand what metrics can be observed using Kubernetes technology and how to use it securely to deploy containers in real life.

Cloud-native is an important new concept.
“Cloud-native” means that systems that provide business users with the tools they need, like email, applications and more, have been designed from scratch to best take advantage of the unique capabilities of the cloud. This is different from moving existing technology systems to the cloud without making a lot of changes to the way they’re set up, sometimes known as “lift and shift.” We shared how building cloud-native systems is different from traditional approaches, and how businesses should plan with those differences in mind.

G Suite added even more security controls.
With the help of machine learning, Gmail already blocks up to 99.9 percentof spam, phishing and malware from ever reaching your inbox. This month, we added even more features in Gmail to further protect businesses, including a security sandbox, which lets IT teams analyze email attachments that might be malicious, and sophisticated machine learning to protect emails from malware and phishing. Check out this post to learn more about other G Suite happenings.

Blockchain and cloud can work together.
Blockchain is a technology usually associated with cryptocurrency, but it can also be used to make applications more secure. This post about building applications that use both cloud and blockchain explains how to get the most out of blockchain’s capabilities and the efficiency of cloud. Using this combination of cloud and blockchain can help make transactions private, and enable more accurate predictions.

That’s a wrap for June. To find more stories, visit the Google Cloud blog.

Cloud Covered: What was new in Google Cloud in June

Summer’s here, but that's not the only big thing that arrived this month: We welcomed new partners and have new data technology-related updates to share. Read on for noteworthy Cloud updates in June.

Google will acquire Looker.
We announced our intent to acquire Looker, a company that offers business intelligence, data application, and embedded analytics software. These kinds of tools are important for modern businesses, so they can use all the data they have available to make decisions, and see visualizations of data with graphics and charts. Looker will help extend the analytics tools we already have at Google Cloud. It will let users at businesses define which metrics to use across different sources of data, so everyone can see the same information. Plus, Looker will bring strong analytics technology that can be embedded into other applications that a business is using.

A cloud data warehouse partner came on board.
Yes, data analytics is a big topic at Google Cloud these days. If you think about your own data use—photos and music, for example—you can start to get an idea of how much data exists for businesses. They want to analyze that data to understand more about what’s important to their business—but the sheer volume of data makes it challenging. Cloud data warehouses help to store, manage, and analyze all that data to find useful information. This month, we announced a partnership with data warehouse provider Snowflake, which will give people another way to bring in a wider variety of data sources to Google Cloud, then use and analyze all that data.

School’s out, but the learning never stops.
We announced a new Google Cloud certification challenge in June: Study, take an exam, get certified within 12 weeks, and you’ll get a $100 Google Store voucher. These certifications are becoming more important as employers recognize how important cloud skills are to their businesses, and there are different levels of certifications based on experience level. Plus, we announced some new Qwiklabs quests—self-paced labs designed to educate cloud developers. The quests help developers understand what metrics can be observed using Kubernetes technology and how to use it securely to deploy containers in real life.

Cloud-native is an important new concept.
“Cloud-native” means that systems that provide business users with the tools they need, like email, applications and more, have been designed from scratch to best take advantage of the unique capabilities of the cloud. This is different from moving existing technology systems to the cloud without making a lot of changes to the way they’re set up, sometimes known as “lift and shift.” We shared how building cloud-native systems is different from traditional approaches, and how businesses should plan with those differences in mind.

G Suite added even more security controls.
With the help of machine learning, Gmail already blocks up to 99.9 percentof spam, phishing and malware from ever reaching your inbox. This month, we added even more features in Gmail to further protect businesses, including a security sandbox, which lets IT teams analyze email attachments that might be malicious, and sophisticated machine learning to protect emails from malware and phishing. Check out this post to learn more about other G Suite happenings.

Blockchain and cloud can work together.
Blockchain is a technology usually associated with cryptocurrency, but it can also be used to make applications more secure. This post about building applications that use both cloud and blockchain explains how to get the most out of blockchain’s capabilities and the efficiency of cloud. Using this combination of cloud and blockchain can help make transactions private, and enable more accurate predictions.

That’s a wrap for June. To find more stories, visit the Google Cloud blog.

From the kitchen to the factory: Three surprising places you’ll find Chrome Enterprise

We talk a lot about how cloud-native devices like Chromebooks—which automatically update and store your work in the cloud—can help you stay productive at work. What you might not know is that businesses are using these devices in unexpected ways to keep their organizations on track, whether it’s cooking your favorite dish, making the factory floor more efficient, or bringing devices to ambulances for on-the-go emergency care. Here are three surprising examples of enterprises using Chromebooks and Chrome Enterprise to help employees be better trained, better informed, and better connected.

Panda Restaurant Group: cooking your favorite dishes perfectly, every time
When Panda Express customers order their favorite meals—such as the Original Orange Chicken, Broccoli Beef, and KungPao Chicken Breast—they expect the dish they know and love to be the same each time. That’s why in almost 400 locations, Panda Restaurant Group associates train employees on these recipes with the help of Chromebooks. “Chromebooks make it easier for new associates to complete e-modules and onboarding,” says Clark Yang, a training leader at a Panda Express in Los Angeles.

Royal Technologies: bringing the factory floor to the cloud, some assembly required
To give manufacturing managers on the factory floor an easier way to check parts quality, manufacturing company Royal Technologies placed Acer Chromebase CA24I devices on shop floors. As parts come off the assembly line, managers compare them to images on the Chromebase screen, then pack the parts for shipping. They can even generate quality-check reports by filling out a Google Form on the Chromebase and sharing results with customers via Google Sheets. “We’re not only keeping parts quality high,” says French Williams, IT Manager at Royal Technologies, “we’re also communicating more closely with our customers.”

Middlesex Hospital: equipping paramedics with tools to help patients, fast
When you’re treating a person who needs critical care, time is precious. Middlesex Hospital paramedics understand this intimately—they receive more than 10,000 emergency calls each year. The hospital uses Chromebooks to respond to these calls quickly, so that treatment can start within seconds after arriving on the scene. “Even though they’re built to withstand rough handling, they don’t weigh down our emergency packs,” says Jim Santacroce, Manager of Emergency Medical Services at Middlesex Hospital, of their Chromebooks. “Their battery life keeps pace with our long shifts. It takes no time at all to learn how to use Chrome OS on Chromebooks—and when you open them, they boot up almost immediately. We don’t need to watch the minutes tick away while we wait to open a patient record—especially in the high-pressure emergency environment.”

Whether responding to a 911 call or tracking patient care, healthcare providers at Middlesex Hospital rely on the flexibility and security of Chrome Enterprise to put the focus back on patients.

These are just a few examples of how businesses from different industries are using Chrome Enterprise to increase productivity, inspire collaboration, and better serve their customers. To find more stories like these, visit Chrome Enterprise on the Google Cloud blog.

Cloud Covered: What was new with Google Cloud in May

As May flowers bloomed, we watched our garden of blog posts grow. New features in Android phones and Gmail cropped up, and we’ve got some updates for cloud developers. Plus, check out photos and details about our new machine learning supercomputers. Here’s what was new.

Android phones help add security.
Android phones (versions 7.0+, Nougat) now come with a built-in security key. This is the FIDO type of security key, an industry standard that can be used for two-factor authentication—an extra verification step on top of a password that makes your sign-ins resistant to phishing scams.

Calendar now comes in dark mode.
When you’re looking at your Google Calendar, or at Keep, our task management tool, you can now see it in dark mode. This is nice in low light, for those of you checking the next day’s schedule in the dark, since it reduces screen brightness. Whether it’s enabled by default will depend on your version of Android and your settings. Plus, we announced the launch of Gmail confidential mode last month, so you’ll soon be able to send messages with built-in information rights management controls. This means you can create expiration dates and revoke sent messages, plus these messages can’t be forwarded, copied, printed or downloaded.

Learn lots more about these and other topics in the brand-new G Suite Learning Center.

Supercomputers for machine learning arrived.
Machine learning (ML) can help with tasks ranging from image recognition to disease research and medical diagnoses. Machine learning requires data scientists to build a model and train it with examples so that the computer can eventually learn a pattern. This requires a lot of computing power. Super powerful and expensive data centers full of servers were not enough to handle the growth of AI workloads and computational horsepower, so we created TPUs, our own hardware chips, just for the purpose of speeding up machine learning. Now, those TPUs are publicly available in pods, which are essentially stacks of these TPUs linked together to form an AI supercomputer. Data scientists and researchers can use them to do machine learning tasks much faster, in minutes or hours compared to days or weeks previously. Make sure to take a look at the photos in the post—when it comes to massive modern supercomputers, a picture is worth a thousand words. 

What cloud developers are learning about
Behind many of the apps and websites you use everyday are these things called APIs (short for application programming interface), which essentially allow these apps and sites to talk to each other. Think of a website that has a Google map embedded, for example—there’s an API in use there. API design is a hot topic among developers, since they have to make sure that different applications can all talk to each other to make a website or app run more smoothly for users. One popular post last month was about a newer way to design APIs that is simpler and requires less documentation for developers and software.

That’s a wrap for May. Stay tuned to the Google Cloud blog for more.

Helping enterprises in India transform their businesses in the cloud

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In the last year, there’s been an upward trend in cloud adoption in India. In fact, NASSCOM finds that cloud spending in India is estimated to grow at 30% per annum to cross the US$7 billion mark by 2022.


In my conversations with customers, discussions have evolved beyond cost savings and efficiencies. While those are still very relevant reasons for adopting cloud technologies, Indian enterprises are looking to Google Cloud to help them drive digital transformation, identify new revenue generating business models, reach previously untapped consumer markets, and build customer loyalty through greater insight and personalization.


To help more enterprises in India take advantage of the cloud, today we’re kicking off our Google Cloud Summit in Mumbai and next week we take the show on the road to customers in New Delhi and Bangalore. More of a community gathering than a conference, our Cloud Summits are where conversations start, partnerships form and problems are solved; and where customers convene to learn from their peers and experts about how the cloud is transforming business. It’s also our opportunity to better understand the needs of Indian businesses, and to get inspired by our customers’ success stories. Here are a few highlights.




Tata Steel: Mining data and maximizing its power


Tata Steel is a great example of an established enterprise from a traditional industry that is modernizing and embracing cloud computing. With an ambition to be a leader in manufacturing in India and a digital-first organization by 2022, Tata Steel believes smart analytics is key to enhancing operational efficiency and gaining business advantage.

To organize data from siloed systems across the organization and make it easily accessible to all employees, Tata Steel is using Cloud Search and plans to scale it to more than one million documents and 28 disparate enterprise content sources including enterprise resource planning (ERP) and SharePoint. In fact, Tata Steel is one of the first Indian enterprises to harness the power of Cloud Search to meet some of the most aggressive ingestion demands, with indexing durations reduced from weeks to seconds.


They are also leveraging Google Cloud Platform (GCP) services like Google Cloud Storage and BigQuery to build their data lake and enterprise data warehouse so they can take advantage of advanced analytics and machine learning. Managed services such as AI Platform further enable Tata Steel to manage end-to-end AI/ML workflows within the GCP console. This complements their existing on-premise reporting and analytics tools, and brings data management to the forefront of everything they do—from forecasting market demand to predictive equipment maintenance.


“Digital is not just a goal, it’s become a way of life. We are digitizing everything from the deployment of factory vehicles to improving material throughput to marketing and sales. As a result, we have petabytes of structured and unstructured data that is not only waiting to be mined, but that we can generate intelligence from to create opportunities across our multiple lines of business using GCP,” said Sarajit Jha, Chief Business Transformation & Digital Solutions at Tata Steel.


Helping L&T Financial Services reach customers in rural communities


In rural communities, quick access to financial services can make a tremendous difference to livelihoods. L&T Financial Services provides farm-equipment finance, micro loans and two-wheeler finance to consumers across rural India backed by a strong digital and analytics platform. Their digital-loan approval app, which runs on GCP, makes it significantly faster and easier for people to apply for financial assistance to purchase important things such as farming equipment and two-wheelers. It also helps rural women entrepreneurs get quicker access to funds for their businesses through micro loans.


L&T Financial found G Suite to be a far better collaborative tool to help staff work together efficiently. Employees can interact with each other in real time using Hangouts Meet, and the task of information sharing is more seamless and secure through Drive. BigQuery also helps L&T Financial Services generate behavior scorecards to track credit quality of its micro-loan customers.


“Cloud is the technology that enables us to achieve scale and reach. Today there are countless data points available about rural consumers which enable us to personalize our products to serve them better. With access to faster compute power, we can also on-board consumers more efficiently. Our rural businesses have clocked a disbursement CAGR of 60% over the past three years." said Sunil Prabhune, Chief Executive-Rural Finance, and Group Head-Digital, IT and Analytics, L&T Financial Services.


Creating conversational connections for Digitate’s customers


Digitate, a venture of TCS (Tata Consultancy Services), has integrated Dialogflow into its flagship brand ignio, an award-winning artificial intelligence platform for driving IT operations, workload operations and ERP operations for diverse enterprises. This integration is the next step in ignio’s product development journey, and will enable users to chat or talk with ignio to detect issues, triage problems, resolve them and even predict system behavior.


“ignio combines its unique self-healing AIOps capabilities for enterprise IT and business operations with Dialogflow’s AI/ML-based, easy to use, natural and rich conversational capabilities to create an unparalleled, intuitive and feature-rich experience for our customers,” says Akhilesh Tripathi, Head of Digitate.


Indian enterprises going G Suite


The base of Indian enterprises that are making the switch to G Suite to streamline their productivity and collaboration also continues to grow. Sharechat, BookMyShow, Hero MotorCorp, DB Corp and Royal Enfield are now able to move faster within their organizations, using intelligent, cloud-based apps to transform the way they work.


A hybrid and multi-cloud future in India


Customers want and deserve choice and flexibility, and openness continues to be a major differentiator for Google Cloud. Since we announced Anthos, our hybrid, multi-cloud solution at Next ‘19, customer feedback has been overwhelmingly positive. That’s because Anthos embraces open standards, and lets customers run their applications, unmodified, on existing on-prem hardware investments or in the public cloud.


IDC predicts that by 2023, 55% of India 500 organizations will have a multi-cloud management strategy that includes integrated tools across public and private clouds. (IDC FutureScape: Worldwide Cloud 2019 Predictions  — India Implications (# AP43922319). So when we hold our flagship Cloud Summits in India in 2020, I look forward to sharing more success stories of Indian enterprises that have taken the next step in their digital transformation journey.

Posted by Nitin Bawankule, Country Director, Google Cloud, India