Tag Archives: Gmail

Making our tech spill-proof, crash-proof—thank you, IT

They keep our laptops humming and our work flowing, and they’re often the first people we contact when there’s a problem: I’m talking about IT. Google IT teams can be found scattered throughout the company, perhaps most visited at Techstop departments which are located in every office. This is where we go to ask our system administrators—or IT experts—to help with damage control. These “tech EMTs” troubleshoot the simplest to the most complex of problems every day, just like at your jobs.

Google Tech Stop

To commemorate SysAdmin Appreciation Day (That’s today, by the way.), we stopped by our San Francisco Techstop office to say thank you to our own sysadmins and to ask them a few questions. Much to their surprise, they didn’t have to fix an issue for us. 

What’s one thing you wish people would do before they came to IT?

Emma: Basic troubleshooting, like restarting a machine. You’d be surprised how many problems are resolved with a simple reboot.

Charles: Another tip would be to clear your cache and cookies before stopping by. This can help if you force a shutdown while a program is trying to update. If the program closes before it saves whatever it was doing, it can cause issues—clearing cache can help sometimes.

If you could wave a wand and eliminate a recurring problem that you deal with, what would it be?

Emma: The blue screen of death when machines don’t run on a modern OS. It causes disruption and takes entirely too long to remediate. I wish it would just go away.

Charles: Resetting passwords or sign-in credentials, in general. I’d love it if we didn’t have to do this, but I understand that people forget. 

What’s your favorite Google product hack or tip?

Emma: If you type “chrome://restart” into your Chrome browser, it’ll restart your browser and re-open tabs. I use this if my connection is slow or if my browser doesn’t load properly.  

Charles: I like to save time with Gmail shortcuts. If you want to learn what shortcuts are available, click Shift + ? and you’ll see a list of shortcuts appear on your screen. Just make sure to enable keyboard shortcuts in your Gmail settings first! If you’re working on a Chromebook with Chrome OS, you can click CTRL + ALT + ? and they’ll appear.

What's the weirdest or funniest laptop mishap you've encountered at Google?

Emma: I once had someone come in with a clicking noise on their laptop. I opened the bottom case of their computer and found a piece of a plastic arm from a toy stuck within the base. The person laughed and said, “oh kids…”

Charles: Do you know those little silicon packets that come in packaging or new clothing items? We’ve had dozens of people come into Techstop because their headphone ports stop working. Apparently, these packets get left within backpacks, the beads burst and they jam headphone jacks. Look out for those pesky things.

If you could describe working in IT in just 3 words, what would they be? (Feel free to make them fun!)

Emma: Unpredictable. Exciting. Gratifying.

Charles: Fluid. Inquisical. Magical.

What do you think your job will look like in 5 years? 

Emma: In five years, almost all of our IT systems will be cloud-based. Since troubleshooting systems will be a thing of the past, I think we’ll work tighter with product and data analytics teams to suggest and test new systems and environments. 

Charles: We help thousands of employees fix IT issues, and we're able to do this efficiently by focusing on how to address problems that happen over and over again. We call this "root reduction.” Root reduction helps us scale our IT services, and it also frees up our schedules so that we can focus on more strategic work. In five years, I think we’ll use the time we save through root reduction to become internal IT consultants for teams. We’ll embed with individual departments to help them solve trickier problems or workflows specific to their needs. 

From resetting our passwords to debugging and fixing a system crash, we salute you “IT guy” (or gal!). Thanks for keeping us online, even when we drown our computers in coffee.

ICYMI: G Suite in 2019, so far

It’s been a busy year for G Suite. Gmail celebrated its 15th birthday, and we launched a slew of updates at Google Cloud Next ‘19. For a recap on what’s happened in G Suite this year thus far, read on.

Communication is key.

Time flies. Earlier this year, we celebrated Gmail’s 15th birthday. To commemorate the occasion, we introduced new features in your favorite email to help you write emails faster (with the help of machine learning), and also made it possible to schedule when your emails go through to colleagues. Gmail also got more dynamic so that you can take action straight from within your inbox, like resolving Google Docs comments. Lastly, we gave Gmail’s mobile interface a good sprucing up—hello gorgeous!

Besides updating Gmail, we also brought businesses a secure (and intelligent) way to communicate no matter location or device: Google Voice for G Suite. Built in the cloud, Voice for G Suite is smart enough to transcribe voicemails for you and block pesky spam calls. Say goodbye to lengthy conference bridge numbers.
Take-home tip: While we’re on the subject, if you accidentally click “send” on an email that you didn’t mean to, you can recall it by clicking “undo” at the bottom of your inbox. It appears after you’ve sent an email and stays on your screen for up to 30 seconds before disappearing. You can choose the length that it appears in your settings.


G Suite Undo Feature

Putting the team in “teamwork.” 

People talk all the time about how collaboration is key, but nearly everyone defines collaboration differently. (More on that in this post.) Here’s our take: we think software can only be called collaborative if your tools are easy to use and if they help people stay productive. It’s called “teamwork,” after all.

In G Suite, we’re focused on making our apps intuitive and intelligent so that people can accomplish things quicker. That’s why we recently added things like intelligent grammar suggestions in Docs. But we think all work tools should integrate together easily, no matter if they’re Google apps or apps outside of G Suite. That’s why we introduced ways to comment on Microsoft files and beefed up integrations with Dropbox.


Take-home tip: Keyboard shortcuts are a life-saver. If you’re working in a Google Sheet, and want to add a comment quickly, type Ctrl + Alt + M.


Comment in Sheets

We’re always making updates like these to make G Suite more useful for you. Keep track of the latest on our website, and stay tuned for more recaps like this in the months to come.

ICYMI: G Suite in 2019, so far

It’s been a busy year for G Suite. Gmail celebrated its 15th birthday, and we launched a slew of updates at Google Cloud Next ‘19. For a recap on what’s happened in G Suite this year thus far, read on.

Communication is key.

Time flies. Earlier this year, we celebrated Gmail’s 15th birthday. To commemorate the occasion, we introduced new features in your favorite email to help you write emails faster (with the help of machine learning), and also made it possible to schedule when your emails go through to colleagues. Gmail also got more dynamic so that you can take action straight from within your inbox, like resolving Google Docs comments. Lastly, we gave Gmail’s mobile interface a good sprucing up—hello gorgeous!

Besides updating Gmail, we also brought businesses a secure (and intelligent) way to communicate no matter location or device: Google Voice for G Suite. Built in the cloud, Voice for G Suite is smart enough to transcribe voicemails for you and block pesky spam calls. Say goodbye to lengthy conference bridge numbers.
Take-home tip: While we’re on the subject, if you accidentally click “send” on an email that you didn’t mean to, you can recall it by clicking “undo” at the bottom of your inbox. It appears after you’ve sent an email and stays on your screen for up to 30 seconds before disappearing. You can choose the length that it appears in your settings.


G Suite Undo Feature

Putting the team in “teamwork.” 

People talk all the time about how collaboration is key, but nearly everyone defines collaboration differently. (More on that in this post.) Here’s our take: we think software can only be called collaborative if your tools are easy to use and if they help people stay productive. It’s called “teamwork,” after all.

In G Suite, we’re focused on making our apps intuitive and intelligent so that people can accomplish things quicker. That’s why we recently added things like intelligent grammar suggestions in Docs. But we think all work tools should integrate together easily, no matter if they’re Google apps or apps outside of G Suite. That’s why we introduced ways to comment on Microsoft files and beefed up integrations with Dropbox.


Take-home tip: Keyboard shortcuts are a life-saver. If you’re working in a Google Sheet, and want to add a comment quickly, type Ctrl + Alt + M.


Comment in Sheets

We’re always making updates like these to make G Suite more useful for you. Keep track of the latest on our website, and stay tuned for more recaps like this in the months to come.

Greater protection and control with three Gmail security tools

What’s changing

We’re making three Gmail security features generally available (GA). The features were previously in beta. Check out the linked announcements for more information on each:

  • Security sandbox, which detects the presence of previously unknown malware in attachments by virtually "executing" them in a private, secure sandbox environment. Learn more.
  • Advanced phishing and malware protection, which provides new controls to place emails into a quarantine, protect against anomalous attachment types, and protect your Google Groups from inbound spoofing emails. Learn more.
  • Gmail confidential mode, which provides built-in information rights management controls in your emails by allowing senders to create expiration dates and revoke previously sent messages. Learn more.

Who’s impacted

Admins and end users

Why you’d use it

When you deploy and manage security tools at scale, you can more effectively protect your users from threats. With these features now in GA, everyone in your organization—from admins to end users—is more secure.

How to get started


  • Admins:
    • Security sandbox: Note: available to G Suite Enterprise and G Suite Enterprise for Education editions only. Find and turn on the beta security sandbox feature at Admin console > Menu > Apps > G Suite > Gmail > Advanced settings. Use our Help Center to find more information on how to detect harmful attachments.
    • Advanced phishing and malware protection: Find and control these features at Admin console > Menu > Apps > G Suite > Gmail > Safety. You’ll find new options for anomalous attachment and groups spoofing protections, and see the quarantine option available for all controls. Use our Help Center to learn more about how to enhance phishing and malware protection.
    • Gmail confidential mode: This feature is on by default so no action is required to get started. To disable the feature, navigate to Admin console > Apps > G Suite > Settings for Gmail > User settings.
  • End users:
    • Security sandbox: No action needed.
    • Advanced phishing and malware protection: No action needed.
    • Gmail confidential mode: Follow the steps in this Help Center article to send and open confidential emails.

Helpful links



Availability

Rollout details

  • Security Sandbox
  • Advanced phishing and malware protection
    • Rapid Release domains: Extended rollout (potentially longer than 15 days for feature visibility) starting on June 25, 2019.
    • Scheduled Release domains: Extended rollout (potentially longer than 15 days for feature visibility) starting on June 25, 2019.
  • Gmail confidential mode

G Suite editions

  • Security Sandbox
    • Available to G Suite Enterprise and G Suite Enterprise for Education.
    • Not available to G Suite Basic, G Suite Business, G Suite for Education, and G Suite for Nonprofits.
  • Advanced phishing and malware protection
    • Controls are available to all G Suite editions.
    • Chart to view affected emails available is part of the security center and so is available to G Suite Enterprise edition only.
  • Gmail confidential mode:
    • Available to all G Suite editions.

On/off by default?

  • Security sandbox: This feature will be OFF by default and can be enabled at the OU level.
  • Advanced phishing and malware protection: This feature will be ON by default.
  • Gmail confidential mode: This feature will be ON by default.

Stay up to date with G Suite launches

Take action by July 8, 2019, to ensure your users can continue to use third-party apps accessing Gmail data

What’s changing

Security and privacy are extremely important to Google. To better protect your data, we’ve made an important update to our policies governing third-party apps (web, Android, iOS, Chrome, and other apps) accessing Gmail data using G Suite APIs and OAuth2.

We previously announced that apps accessing user data for non-enterprise accounts using certain Gmail APIs had to be verified to ensure compliance with new privacy and security requirements using our OAuth API Application Verification. Starting on July 8, 2019, we’ll apply similar requirements for apps you may use within your domain.

Who’s impacted

Admins and end users

Why it matters

While existing unverified apps will continue to work for users who installed them before July 8, after this date we’ll block new installs for unverified third-party apps that access Gmail data and that you don’t explicitly trust (whitelist) in the G Suite Admin console.

How to get started


  • Admins:
    • Review unverified apps in your environment: Please review the unverified apps currently in use in your organization’s G Suite environment and decide which apps you want to trust and allow users to continue to install. The primary admin contact at your organization will receive an email by June 21, 2019, with a list of those unverified apps, including the number of users and whether or not you have trusted them in API Permissions.
    • Trust apps that you want to allow users to continue to install: To trust an app, use our API Permissions (OAuth apps whitelisting) feature in the Security section of the Admin console. Trusting an app also means that, if users consent, the app will have access to some G Suite user data (OAuth2 scopes) that you’ve otherwise restricted using this same tool. For example, if you’ve generally blocked access to Gmail OAuth2 scopes, trusted apps will have access for accounts where users consent.