Tag Archives: Gmail

New ways to manage language settings using the Gmail API

What’s changing

We’re extending the Gmail API by bringing developers new ways to manage the language settings your users. If you currently have applications that configure Gmail accounts during migrations or initial on-boarding, this is a great way to ensure each account has the correct display language.

Who’s impacted

Admins and developers.

Why you’d use it

With these new language settings methods, it’s possible for apps to get and update a user’s Gmail display language all within one place—the Gmail API. You may have previously used the update language settings method in the Admin SDK’s Email Settings API to handle these types of changes, but that will soon no longer be available. These new methods are good replacements.

How to get started


  • Admins and developers: To try out the new methods, check out the documentation. If you have any issues, you can also use the gmail-api tag on StackOverflow.
  • End users: No action needed.

Additional details

With this update, we’re also bringing you additional functionality, like the ability to:

  • Use these methods to manage the language settings of any user.
  • Get the current display language of a user. This is great for tailoring your application to the user’s language.

Note: If you need pointers on how to migrate from using the Email Settings API, specifically the update language settings method, here’s a detailed migration guide to help you transition.

Helpful links



Availability

Rollout details


G Suite editions

  • Available to all G Suite editions.

On/off by default?

  • This feature will be OFF by default and can be enabled at the user level.

Stay up to date with G Suite launches

Improvements to Gmail approved and blocked address lists in the Admin console

What’s changing

We’re adding the following improvements to help you easily view and manage your admin address lists for approved/blocked senders:

  • New search capability: You can now search your address lists. Click the magnifying glass icon to open a search bar. The search takes place as you type.
  • Sorted and deduped lists: Address lists are now sorted alphabetically, first by domains then by users. Duplicate entries are automatically removed.
  • View your entire address list at once: We’ve added a View All option at the bottom of these lists. This button takes you to a read-only summary view, displaying all entries on the address list.


Increased emphasis on sender authentication requirement for approved senders
We’ve also made some changes to emphasize sender authentication. The sender authentication requirement is meant to protect your users against spoofed messages. You can now clearly see which of your approved senders require authentication, and we strongly encourage you to enable authentication for any senders that currently have this disabled.

When you add new senders to an approved senders list, the “Require sender authentication” setting is enabled by default. Learn more about how sender authentication protects your domain in the Help Center.

Who’s impacted

Admins only

Why you’d use it

Gmail administrators use address lists in the Admin console to maintain lists of approved senders, blocked senders, or even addresses and domains for routing and compliance rules. We are improving the way you sort, search, and manage these lists to make this easier than before.

How to get started



Additional details


  • Sender authentication was, and still is, required by default, and we strongly encourage you to enable authentication for any senders that currently have this disabled. The sender authentication checkbox has changed from "Do not require sender authentication (not recommended)" to "Require sender authentication (recommended)" in order to make it easier for admins to determine if sender authentication is enabled or not for a specific address.
  • Your addresses are now sorted and deduped. Your address lists will now be sorted by domains, and then by users, and may be smaller than the previous lists due to the removal of duplicate entries.

Helpful links



Availability

Rollout details


G Suite editions
Available to all G Suite editions

On/off by default?
This feature will be ON by default.

Stay up to date with G Suite launches

Gmail making email more secure with MTA-STS standard

What’s changing

SMTP MTA Strict Transport Security (MTA-STS) is a new internet standard that improves email security by requiring authentication checks and good encryption for email in transit.

Gmail will start enforcing this standard in beta, which you can read more about on the Google Security blog. For G Suite admins:

  1. Security health within the security center for G Suite will start including recommendations about MTA-STS policies for your domain.
  2. G Suite admins can choose to set up MTA-STS policies and reporting for incoming mail in their DNS server. While admins could do this previously, it will become more impactful now that Gmail is enforcing the MTA-STS policies.

Use our Help Center to learn more about how to use the MTA-STS standard.

Who’s impacted

Admins only

Why you’d use it

MTA-STS is a new internet standard that will increase email security by acting as a deterrent against pervasive monitoring of email traffic and protecting against man-in-the-middle attacks. You can make your email communications more secure by setting MTA-STS policies and ask the organizations with which you communicate to also set MTA-STS policies for their mail servers.

How to get started



Additional details

Option to set up a MTA-STS policy
G Suite admins can choose to set up a policy for incoming mail with their DNS server. See the Help Center for details and instructions on how to set up an MTA-STS policy for your domain.

Possible email bouncebacks
While we don’t anticipate significant increase in bouncebacks, there are two aspects of the new standard which could result in bouncebacks:

  • TLS enforcement with certificate validation will prevent bad actors from intercepting emails in transit just like HTTPS does it for web traffic.If a bad actor tries to intercept the email, as Gmail enforces MTA-STS, it will now bounceback, preventing the intercept.
  • As Gmail will honor policies set by servers you are sending mail to, there’s a possibility that they have misconfigured policies or their servers, and that we will not deliver emails as a result. In this case, users will get an email bounceback with details.

New security center MTA-STS recommendations for your domain
If you go to the security health section of the security center for G Suite (Admin Console > Security > Security Health, available to G Suite Enterprise and Enterprise for Education domains only) you’ll see a new “MTA-STA” suggestion. It will tell you whether you have a policy set up, as well as highlighting misconfigurations in policies.

Helpful links



Availability

Rollout details


G Suite editions

  • All G Suite customers can define MTA-STS policies.
  • MTA-STS policy suggestions in the security center are available to G Suite Enterprise and G Suite Enterprise for Education customers only.

On/off by default?

  • MTA-STS policies for your domain will be OFF by default and can be enabled at the domain level.
  • MTA-STS policy suggestions in the security center will be ON by default.


Stay up to date with G Suite launches

Increase email security with the security sandbox for Gmail beta

This announcement was made at Google Cloud Next ‘19 in San Francisco. Check out Next OnAir to tune into the livestream or watch session recordings following the event.

What’s changing 

Security sandbox for Gmail (beta) detects the presence of previously unknown malware in attachments by virtually "executing" them in a private, secure sandbox environment, and analyzing the side effects on the operating system to determine malicious behavior.

Email attachments are detonated within a sandbox in the exact same way as they would if an actual user had clicked on it. This is done in a matter of minutes prior to the delivery of the email, and provides users with an extra layer of security. Security sandbox has been developed with a focus to provide coverage against malware propagated through malicious embedded scripts and zero day threats. The security sandbox for Gmail beta will provide:

  • Granular admin controls for rules to trigger pre-delivery deep scanning and quarantine behavior for potentially malicious emails 
  • Reporting through the G Suite security center 

Who’s impacted 

Settings impact admins only. If turned on, users may notice a delay of a few minutes in the delivery of affected mail due to scanning time.

Why you’d use it 

Security sandbox provides an additional level of anti-malware protection over and above conventional detection. By virtually opening an attachment in a secure environment that can analyze the effects on the target operating system, it’s better able to detect ransomware, sophisticated malware propagated through embedded scripts (like files containing macros or .js files), and zero-day threats. 

How to get started 

  • Admins: Find and turn on the beta security sandbox feature at Admin console > Menu > Apps > G Suite > Gmail > Advanced settings. Use our Help Center to find more information on how to detect harmful attachments
  • End users: No action needed 



Additional details 

Granular admin controls 
If desired, admins will be able to set up custom rules to control which messages are tested in the security sandbox. If custom rules are not applied, all messages with attachments sent to the OU will be checked in the sandbox. Rules can be customized for each organizational unit (OU). Admins can also decide what to do with messages that have malware. Malware detected by Security Sandbox is put in the spam folder by default. You can quarantine malware attachments detected by Security Sandbox instead. Create a content compliance rule using the spam metadata attribute.


Availability 

Rollout details 



G Suite editions 

  • Available to G Suite Enterprise and G Suite Enterprise for Education 
  • Not available to G Suite Basic, G Suite Business, G Suite for Education, and G Suite for Nonprofits 


On/off by default? 
This feature will be OFF by default and can be customized at an OU level.


Stay up to date with G Suite launches

Advanced phishing and malware protection for Gmail beta

This announcement was made at Google Cloud Next ‘19 in San Francisco. Check out Next OnAir to tune into the livestream or watch session recordings following the event.


What’s changing 

We’re launching a beta program to provide admins with even more controls for advanced anti-phishing and malware protections via the advanced safety settings in Gmail. These build on the advanced protections we announced in 2018. Admins who are part of the beta will have new controls to:

  • Place emails into a quarantine - Route emails that match phishing and malware controls to a new or existing quarantine. This will be available for new and existing controls. 
  • Protect against anomalous attachment types in emails - Identify emails with unusual attachment types and choose to automatically display a warning banner, send them to spam, or quarantine the messages. 
  • Protect your Google Groups from inbound emails spoofing your domain - Identify unauthenticated emails potentially spoofing your domain and choose to automatically display a warning banner, send them to spam, or quarantine the messages. 


In addition to the new controls, we’ll also update the interface to make it easier to see what settings you have applied and understand what actions you’re taking as a result of each control.

Who’s impacted 

Admins only

Why you’d use it 

By adding more specific controls, including the ability to quarantine potentially risky messages, we hope to enable admins to optimize protections for their organization. This will help reduce threats and increase the security of your data while making the experience as simple as possible for your users. 

How to get started 


  • Admins: Find and turn on the beta features at Admin console > Menu > Apps > G Suite > Gmail > Safety. You’ll find new options to turn on anomalous attachment and groups spoofing protections, and see the quarantine option available for all controls. Use our Help Center to learn more about how to enhance phishing and malware protection
  • End users: No action needed 


Additional details 

Place emails into a quarantine 

All the advanced safety settings for Gmail now let you quarantine emails more easily. Choose to move any email that meets certain criteria to a pre-existing quarantine, or create a new quarantine for such messages. Use our Help Center to find out more about email quarantines.



Protect against anomalous attachment types in emails 

Less common file types as email attachments are often used to spread malware. However, different domains might have legitimate uses for uncommon file types. Therefore we’re giving admins more control over how to handle emails with these files attached.

What is identified as an anomalous attachment will be automatically customized for each domain. An intelligent algorithm determines which file types your domain commonly receives and will model the detection based on that. For example, a specific file type may be commonly used on Domain A, but not on Domain B. If both domains had the "Anomalous Attachment" setting enabled, an email with this file type attached would be flagged for Domain B, but not Domain A.

You can see which file types are filtered for your domain by going to the security center’s suspicious attachments chart, filtering by "Anomalous Attachments" and then looking at "Attachment Extensions" (available to G Suite Enterprise and Enterprise for Education domains only).

Admins will be able to:

  • Turn the uncommon attachment type detection on or off. 
  • If turned on, choose whether to keep relevant emails in the user’s inbox with a warning banner displayed, send emails to spam automatically, or move emails to quarantine. 
  • While we expect the anomalous attachment customization described above to work well, if needed admins can whitelist specific uncommon file types they don’t want identified. 

Admin controls for unusual attachment types 


Protect your Groups from inbound emails spoofing your domain

External senders can spoof emails to appear as if they come from your domain, using the same protocols that enable many legitimate systems to send email. This setting extends your options to control potential spoofing emails by preventing spoofed messages from posting to Google Groups on your domain. Use our Help Center to find out more about spoofing. Admins in the beta will be able to:

  • Turn the Groups spoofing protection on or off. 
  • If turned on, choose whether to keep relevant emails in the user’s inbox with a warning banner displayed, send emails to spam automatically, or move emails to quarantine (if available). 
  • Choose whether to apply the settings only to Private Groups (groups with specifically limited membership or intended for organization members only) or All Groups (Private Groups + ones without restricted membership) 

Admin controls for inbound email spoofing protections 

Availability 

Rollout details 



G Suite editions
Controls are available to all G Suite editions. Chart to view affected emails available is part of the security center and so is available to G Suite Enterprise edition only.

On/off by default?
This feature will be OFF by default.

Stay up to date with G Suite launches

The cloud demystified: How it works and why it matters

Whether you’re backing up photos or streaming our favorite TV shows, you may know it’s all made possible by the cloud. But for a lot of us, that’s where the understanding ends. With Next ’19, Google Cloud’s annual customer conference, this week, it’s a good time to ask: What is this cloud, anyway?

Before cloud, businesses maintained fleets of computers (known as “servers” in tech speak) to create websites and apps, and to equip employees with the software needed to build them. Those computers stayed in a server room or a nearby data center, connected by an internal network and to the broader internet. A company’s IT team had to monitor all those computers, network cables and other equipment—and keep it all working for employees, under budget. So that meant that every few years, the IT team bought new computers and took care of any maintenance and upgrades, like adding a new networking line or new software.

Cut to today: we have faster computing speeds and better internet connectivity, and these have made it easier for computers around the world to connect quickly. It’s no longer necessary for businesses to own servers and data centers. Since Google already has a massive global network—made up of things like our own data centers and undersea cables—we can provide that infrastructure to businesses so they can build products and services. In a nutshell, that’s what Google Cloud is—access to Google’s global infrastructure and all the state-of-the-art tools we’ve created over time to serve Google’s billions of users.

This new way of building in the cloud has resulted in changes to the way that companies use computers and other technology.

Why is the cloud such a big deal?

The cloud took the tech world by storm, and it keeps growing for consumer and business uses. Companies want to use the newest, fastest technology, which isn’t possible when you’re only buying new computers every few years.

Public cloud providers allow companies to use the newest technology without having to buy and maintain it themselves. Google Cloud, for example, maintains complicated networks that can quickly move data around the world. Keeping information secure, a challenge for businesses, is also easier with the cloud, since encryption is built in. Plus, the huge scale of cloud means it can run apps faster.

Cloud companies can also be more efficient with space and power. At Google, we buy enough wind and solar to offset the electricity we use, so our customers can get sustainability benefits they might not get on their own.
Cooling towers at a data center in Belgium.png

Cooling towers at a data center in Belgium

How does cloud affect your everyday life?

When businesses started using the cloud, their customers started using the cloud, too. It makes lots of what we do on our phones, tablets, and laptops possible. For example, Gmail became popular pretty quickly, because it offered a lot more storage so you could keep all your emails—even ones with large attachments. Gmail works because instead of storing emails on one limited server somewhere, a giant network of servers stores those emails. When you check your email, a server in one of those data centers is finding and downloading your newest emails and routing them to your computer or phone. Plus, because Gmail is cloud-based, this opens up opportunities for machine learning to help you in ways you might not notice, like blocking phishing and spam attempts to your inbox.  

What do people talk about at a cloud conference?

When 30,000 or so people converge in San Francisco at Google Cloud Next ’19 this week, they’ll be choosing from hundreds of sessions, panels, and tutorials to learn about cloud computing. Some attendees may be just getting started with the cloud and need to learn the basics, while others are exploring advanced concepts like AI and machine learning. Lots of the sessions explain how Google Cloud-specific products can be used. There are sessions on connecting products from outside of Google Cloud into ours and showing business users how to move their data into the cloud.

That’s your start to understanding cloud. If you want to learn more, tune in to our Next livestream all week.

Source: Gmail Blog


See info about your contacts easily in Gmail on iOS

What’s changing

To help you find more information about someone you are interacting with on your mobile phone, you can now simply tap on their profile picture in Conversation View on Gmail on iOS to see their contact information in more detail. You’ll be able to see information such as:

  • Their email address
  • Their phone number
  • Interactions such as emails and Calendar invitations

Who’s impacted

End users

Why you’d use it

Gmail iOS recently launched a brand new mobile redesign, which provided Gmail users with a new look and feel to help you get things done faster. This new redesign also highlights the importance of avatars, and how many users use these to find more information about people they are interacting with.

How to get started


  • Admins: No action required.
  • End users: In Conversation View on Gmail on iOS, simply tap on someone’s profile picture to see their contact information in more detail.

Additional details

If your organization enters information such as office location and reporting chain in users’ profiles, you’ll also be able to see this information when you click on their profile picture.

Pro Tip: if you are trying to find an upcoming meeting with someone in your organization, the Interactions tab will show you upcoming Calendar events too.

Availability

Rollout details

  • Rapid Release domains: Extended rollout (potentially longer than 15 days for feature visibility) starting on April 4, 2019
  • Scheduled Release domains: Extended rollout (potentially longer than 15 days for feature visibility) starting on April 4, 2019

G Suite editions
Available to all G Suite editions

On/off by default?
This feature will be ON by default.

Stay up to date with G Suite launches

Gmail Smart Compose subject suggestions

What’s changing

Smart Compose can now make suggestions for the subject of your email.

Who’s impacted

End users.

Why you’d use it

Since we announced Gmail Smart Compose in G Suite last year, we’ve seen how Smart Compose suggestions can cut down on the effort it takes for you to write emails and replies. With subject suggestions, Smart Compose can now help you compose your subject line as well.

How to get started


  • Admins: No action required
  • End users: No action is required to begin seeing Smart Compose subject suggestions. When you write the body of your email and then place your cursor in the subject line, you may see Smart Compose suggesting a subject for your email.

Helpful links



Availability

Rollout details


G Suite editions

  • Available to all G Suite editions.

On/off by default?
Smart Compose subject suggestions is a part of Smart Compose, which is ON by default. Users can individually turn it on/off in their Gmail settings.

Stay up to date with G Suite launches

RSVP to Calendar events from forwarded invitations

What’s changing

We're improving how invitation forwarding works in Google Calendar. Now, if guests of a Calendar event have been granted permission to invite others, recipients of forwarded invitation emails can RSVP to the event. This will also then add them to the event as a guest.


Who’s impacted

End users

Why you’d use it

With this feature, guests of an event can now simply forward their invitation to allow others to RSVP and be added to the Calendar event. This eliminates the step of having to go into the event in Calendar to invite additional guests.

How to get started

  • Admins: No action required.
  • End users: Simply forward your Calendar invitation to the guest you’d like to add.

Additional details

Please note, for this feature to work, the organizer must have granted permission for guests to add other guests to the event.

Helpful links



Availability

Rollout details


G Suite editions
Available to all G Suite editions

On/off by default?
This feature will be ON by default.

Stay up to date with G Suite launches

Master your email with these essential Gmail tips

Your email can feel like a never-ending to-do list. And in a world where technology makes you more connected to work than ever before, how do you set ground rules to keep your energy up, your focus sharp and your sanity intact? As a productivity expert at Google, I help Googlers use products like Gmail, Google Drive and Google Calendar to get more done during their busy days. Email in particular can be a source of stress, but it doesn’t have to be. 

Gmail had its birthday earlier this week, and for 15 years, it’s been a helpful sidekick for billions of people around the globe. Part of my job is sharing Gmail-related tips with fellow Googlers—here are my top 10 email management tips for you:


  1. Cut down on notifications: Don’t bother your brain with notifications for every new email—proactively check your email instead. On your phone, you can set up notifications for certain emails—say, the ones from your boss. This will help you identify important emails and disconnect when you want to.
  2. Respond within 24 hours, even if it’s only to check in:You probably can’t get to all emails within 24 hours, but you can avoid getting another follow up email from a coworker. Giving a status update—“Hi, I got this email but not going to get to it until later this week!”—is a great way to set expectations and show them you’re on it.
  3. Close out your email 1-2 times a day: Email is necessary to get your job done, but it’s also the ultimate distraction. Most people leave it open all day and check it every 30 minutes (if not more). Try closing your email tab when you have time to do deep work: the ability to focus without distraction on a demanding task.
  4. Don’t click on an email more than twice: If you read an email then mark it as unread, you’ll have to read it again to remember what to do with it. Read it once to scan and tag your future action (for example, labeling it as “must respond,” or “to do this week,”) then one more time when you answer it.
  5. Sorting, reading and answering emails should be separate activities:Most people bounce between sorting one email for later, reading one, answering one and repeating. We lose so much energy switching between these activities. Instead, tell yourself “right now I’m sorting everything.” Then when you’re done, read everything you need to read.
  6. Keep emails that require clear action—otherwise archive or delete:When your inbox contains emails without clear action items, it gives your brain the false sense of having too much to do. Be ruthless about deleting, archiving, or snoozing emails that don’t require an immediate action from you in some way.
  7. Skip some emails: Every email you see takes a tiny piece of your energy, so each item in your inbox should be something you need to look at. Gmail lets you create filters so that certain emails “skip your inbox” and won’t appear as new emails. For example, if you get a lot of email newsletters, set up a filter with “Has the words:unsubscribe”—now, those emails won’t distract you, but you can search for them later.
  8. Don’t mix your read and unread emails:Combining read and unread emails in your inbox is a recipe for anxiety. New emails should come into one section and emails that you’ve already read and require an action should be in a different section. You can create a Multiple Inbox pane or “move” emails to different label that denotes a specific action (such as “To Do” or “Follow Up”).
  9. To stay focused, keep new email out of sight. It can be hard to answer pressing emails when  you’re constantly tempted to open the bright and shiny new emails that just came in. Open up a section like your “Snoozed emails” (emails that you’ve saved for later) or your “Starred emails” (your high-priority emails) so you can stay focused on those tasks, instead of getting distracted by new email.
  10. To find what you need, just search: Email labels can help you stay organized, but think about how Google got its start … Search! Searching your email—instead of digging through labels—is actually a faster way to find the email you’re looking for. You can search by date, sender, subject (and more) and you can get even more specific with queries like “has:attachment” or “older_than:6m” (m=months).

For those of you new to using G Suite, there are loads of ways to stay productive in email. Learn more or try it out for yourself. Now go forth, and tackle that email.