Tag Archives: gaming

Indie Games Accelerator – Applications open for class of 2019

https://img.youtube.com/vi/tZdD9l4KmbU/maxresdefault.jpg
Last year we announced the Indie Games Accelerator, a special edition of Launchpad Accelerator, to help top indie game developers from emerging markets achieve their full potential on Google Play. Our team of program mentors had an amazing time coaching some of the best gaming talent from India, Pakistan, and Southeast Asia. We’re very encouraged by the positive feedback we received for the program and are excited to bring it back in 2019.

Applications for the class of 2019 are now open, and we’re happy to announce that we are expanding the program to developers from select countries* in Asia, Middle East, Africa, and Latin America.




Successful participants will be invited to attend two gaming bootcamps, all-expenses-paid at the Google Asia-Pacific office in Singapore, where they will receive personalized mentorship from Google teams and industry experts. Additional benefits include Google hardware, invites to exclusive Google and industry events and more.

Find out more about the program and apply to be a part of it.


* The competition is open to developers from the following countries: Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Vietnam, Egypt, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Nigeria, South Africa, Tunisia, Turkey, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Guatemala, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela.

Posted by Anuj Gulati, Developer Marketing Manager and Sami Kizilbash, Developer Relations Program Manager

Bringing Real-time Spatial Audio to the Web with Songbird

Posted by Jamieson Brettle and Drew Allen, Chrome Media Team

For a virtual scene to be truly immersive, stunning visuals need to be accompanied by true spatial audio to create a realistic and believable experience. Spatial audio tools allow developers to include sounds that can come from any direction, and that are associated in 3D space with audio sources, thus completely enveloping the user in 360-degree sound.

Spatial audio helps draw the user into a scene and creates the illusion of entering an entirely new world. To make this possible, the Chrome Media team has created Songbird, an open source, spatial audio encoding engine that works in any web browser by using the Web Audio API.

The Songbird library takes in any number of mono audio streams and allows developers to programmatically place them in 3D space around the user. Songbird allows you to create immersive soundscapes, realistically reproducing reflection and reverb for the space you describe. Sounds bounce off walls and reflect off materials just as they would in real-life, capturing truly 360-degree sound. Songbird creates an ambisonic soundfield that can then be rendered in real-time for use in your application. We've partnered with the Omnitoneproject, which we blogged about last year, to add higher-order ambisonic support to Omnitone's binaural rendererto produce far more accurate sounding audio than ever before.

Songbird encapsulates Omnitone and with it, developers can now add interactive, full-sphere audio to any web based application. Songbird can scale to any order ambisonics, thereby creating a more realistic sound and higher performance than what is achievable through standard Web Audio API.

Songbird Audio Processing Diagram

The implementation of Songbird is based on the Google spatial mediaspecification. It expects mono input and outputs ambisonic (multichannel) ACN channel layout with SN3D normalization. Detailed documentation may be found here.

As the web emerges as an important VR platformfor delivering content, spatial audio will play a vital role in users' embrace of this new medium. Songbird and Omnitone are key tools in enabling spatial audio on the web platform and establishing it as a preeminent platform for compelling VR experiences. Combining these audio experiences with 3D JavaScript libraries like three.js gives a glimpseinto the future on the web.

Demo combining spatial sound in 3D environment

This project was made possible through close collaboration with Google's Daydream and Web Audio teams. This collaboration allowed us to deliver similar audio capabilities to the web as are available to developers creating Daydream applications.

We look forward to seeing what people do with Songbird now that it's open source. Check out the code on GitHub and let us know what you think. Also available are a number of demoson creating full spherical audio with Songbird.

Bringing Real-time Spatial Audio to the Web with Songbird

For a virtual scene to be truly immersive, stunning visuals need to be accompanied by true spatial audio to create a realistic and believable experience. Spatial audio tools allow developers to include sounds that can come from any direction, and that are associated in 3D space with audio sources, thus completely enveloping the user in 360-degree sound.

Spatial audio helps draw the user into a scene and creates the illusion of entering an entirely new world. To make this possible, the Chrome Media team has created Songbird, an open source, spatial audio encoding engine that works in any web browser by using the Web Audio API.

The Songbird library takes in any number of mono audio streams and allows developers to programmatically place them in 3D space around the user. Songbird allows you to create immersive soundscapes, realistically reproducing reflection and reverb for the space you describe. Sounds bounce off walls and reflect off materials just as they would in real-life, capturing truly 360-degree sound. Songbird creates an ambisonic soundfield that can then be rendered in real-time for use in your application. We’ve partnered with the Omnitone project, which we blogged about last year, to add higher-order ambisonic support to Omnitone’s binaural renderer to produce far more accurate sounding audio than ever before.

Songbird encapsulates Omnitone and with it, developers can now add interactive, full-sphere audio to any web based application. Songbird can scale to any order ambisonics, thereby creating a more realistic sound and higher performance than what is achievable through standard Web Audio API.
Songbird Audio Processing Diagram
The implementation of Songbird is based on the Google spatial media specification. It expects mono input and outputs ambisonic (multichannel) ACN channel layout with SN3D normalization. Detailed documentation may be found here.

As the web emerges as an important VR platform for delivering content, spatial audio will play a vital role in users’ embrace of this new medium. Songbird and Omnitone are key tools in enabling spatial audio on the web platform and establishing it as a preeminent platform for compelling VR experiences. Combining these audio experiences with 3D JavaScript libraries like three.js gives a glimpse into the future on the web.
Demo combining spatial sound in 3D environment
This project was made possible through close collaboration with Google’s Daydream and Web Audio teams. This collaboration allowed us to deliver similar audio capabilities to the web as are available to developers creating Daydream applications.

We look forward to seeing what people do with Songbird now that it's open source. Check out the code on GitHub and let us know what you think. Also available are a number of demos on creating full spherical audio with Songbird.

By Jamieson Brettle and Drew Allen, Chrome Media Team

Making Great Mobile Games with Firebase

So much goes into building and maintaining a mobile game. Let’s say you want to ship it with a level builder for sharing content with other players and, looking forward, you want to roll out new content and unlockables linked with player behavior. Of course, you also need players to be able to easily sign into your soon-to-be hit game.

With a DIY approach, you’d be faced with having to build user management, data storage, server side logic, and more. This will take a lot of your time, and importantly, it would take critical resources away from what you really want to do: build that amazing new mobile game!

Our Firebase SDKs for Unity and C++ provide you with the tools you need to add these features and more to your game with ease. Plus, to help you better understand how Firebase can help you build your next chart-topper, we’ve built a sample game in Unity and open sourced it: MechaHamster. Check it out on Google Play or download the project from GitHub to see how easy it is to integrate Firebase into your game.
Before you dive into the code for Mecha Hamster, here’s a rundown of the Firebase products that can help your game be successful.

Analytics

One of the best tools you have to maintain a high-performing game is your analytics. With Google Analytics for Firebase, you can see where your players might be struggling and make adjustments as needed. Analytics also integrates with Adwords and other major ad networks to maximize your campaign performance. If you monetize your game using AdMob, you can link your two accounts and see the lifetime value (LTV) of your players, from in-game purchases and AdMob, right from your Analytics console. And with Streamview, you can see how players are interacting with your game in realtime.

Test Lab for Android - Game Loop Test

Before releasing updates to your game, you’ll want to make sure it works correctly. However, manual testing can be time consuming when faced with a large variety of target devices. To help solve this, we recently launched Firebase Test Lab for Android Game Loop Test at Google I/O. If you add a demo mode to your game, Test Lab will automatically verify your game is working on a wide range of devices. You can read more in our deep dive blog post here.

Authentication

Another thing you’ll want to be sure to take care of before launch is easy sign-in, so your users can start playing as quickly as possible. Firebase Authentication can help by handling all sign-in and authentication, from simple email + password logins to support for common identity providers like Google, Facebook, Twitter, and Github. Just announced recently at I/O, Firebase also now supports phone number authentication. And Firebase Authentication shares state cross-device, so your users can pick up where they left off, no matter what platforms they’re using.

Remote Config

As more players start using your game, you realize that there are few spots that are frustrating for your audience. You may even see churn rates start to rise, so you decide that you need to push some adjustments. With Firebase Remote Config, you can change values in the console and push them out to players. Some players having trouble navigating levels? You can adjust the difficulty and update remotely. Remote Config can even benefit your development cycle; team members can tweak and test parameters without having to make new builds.

Realtime Database

Now that you have a robust player community, you’re probably starting to see a bunch of great player-built levels. With Firebase Realtime Database, you can store player data and sync it in real-time, meaning that the level builder you’ve built can store and share data easily with other players. You don't need your own server and it’s optimized for offline use. Plus, Realtime Database integrates with Firebase Auth for secure access to user specific data.

Cloud Messaging & Dynamic Links

A few months go by and your game is thriving, with high engagement and an active community. You’re ready to release your next wave of new content, but how can you efficiently get the word out to your users? Firebase Cloud Messaging lets you target messages to player segments, without any coding required. And Firebase Dynamic Links allow your users to share this new content — or an invitation to your game — with other players. Dynamic Links survive the app install process, so a new player can install your app and then dive right into the piece of content that was shared with him or her.

At Firebase, our mission is to help mobile developers build better apps and grow successful businesses. When it comes to games, that means taking care of the boring stuff, so you can focus on what matters — making a great game. Our mobile SDKs for C++ and Unity are available now at firebase.google.com/games.

By Darin Hilton, Art Director

Step into the games with new VR videos

YouTube’s become a global destination for people who love watching gaming videos. And we want to take gamers’ viewing experience a step further by exploring how VR videos can put them right at the center of the action. That’s why we partnered with gaming creators and publishers to experiment with the production of 360 and VR videos. What’s come out of those experiments, from “League of Legends” to “Minecraft,” was pretty exciting.

From Let's Play to trailers, there’s a really wide range of gaming content on YouTube, and a lot of these different style videos are now also becoming available in VR. You can check out gameplay from global creators as well as gaming-themed live action videos celebrating games like “Call of Duty.”

Game publishers are also getting involved in VR gaming videos in a big way, from the immensely popular “Clash of Clans” 360-degree video by Supercell to documentaries uploaded by “World of Tanks” publisher Wargaming. Even eSports organizations are producing content for VR, uploading 360-degree content from top events like the “League of Legends” World Championship Finals.

But what if you just want to chill and watch some gaming-themed entertainment content? We got you covered with videos ranging from the classic “Red vs. Blue” series to Stampy’s “Wonder Quest.”


To give you a taste of gaming experience in VR, check out the playlist above for some of our favorite videos so far. It’s a good cross section of the kind of gaming videos we offer in VR, many of which can make you feel like you’re standing inside the game itself. You can watch these videos using the YouTube VR app available on Daydream or with Google Cardboard. If you don’t have a headset, don’t worry, you can still get the 360-degree video experience on your mobile phone or desktop.

Ryan Wyatt, Head of Gaming Content, recently watched “Clash of Clans: Hog Rider 360°.”

Source: YouTube Blog


Introducing Draco: compression for 3D graphics

3D graphics are a fundamental part of many applications, including gaming, design and data visualization. As graphics processors and creation tools continue to improve, larger and more complex 3D models will become commonplace and help fuel new applications in immersive virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR).  Because of this increased model complexity, storage and bandwidth requirements are forced to keep pace with the explosion of 3D data.

The Chrome Media team has created Draco, an open source compression library to improve the storage and transmission of 3D graphics. Draco can be used to compress meshes and point-cloud data. It also supports compressing points, connectivity information, texture coordinates, color information, normals and any other generic attributes associated with geometry.

With Draco, applications using 3D graphics can be significantly smaller without compromising visual fidelity. For users this means apps can now be downloaded faster, 3D graphics in the browser can load quicker, and VR and AR scenes can now be transmitted with a fraction of the bandwidth, rendered quickly and look fantastic.


Sample Draco compression ratios and encode/decode performance*

Transmitting 3D graphics for web-based applications is significantly faster using Draco’s JavaScript decoder, which can be tied to a 3D web viewer. The following video shows how efficient transmitting and decoding 3D objects in the browser can be - even over poor network connections.



Video and audio compression have shaped the internet over the past 10 years with streaming video and music on demand. With the emergence of VR and AR, on the web and on mobile (and the increasing proliferation of sensors like LIDAR) we will soon be swimming in a sea of geometric data. Compression technologies, like Draco, will play a critical role in ensuring these experiences are fast and accessible to anyone with an internet connection. More exciting developments are in store for Draco, including support for creating multiple levels of detail from a single model to further improve the speed of loading meshes.

We look forward to seeing what people do with Draco now that it's open source. Check out the code on GitHub and let us know what you think. Also available is a JavaScript decoder with examples on how to incorporate Draco into the three.js 3D viewer.

By Jamieson Brettle and Frank Galligan, Chrome Media Team

* Specifications: Tests ran with textures and positions quantized at 14-bit precision, normal vectors at 7-bit precision. Ran on a single-core of a 2013 MacBook Pro.  JavaScript decoded using Chrome 54 on Mac OS X.

Build a mobile gaming analytics platform

Popular mobile games can attract millions of players and generate terabytes of game-related data in a short burst of time. This places extraordinary pressure on the infrastructure powering these games and requires scalable data analytics services to provide timely, actionable insights in a cost-effective way.

To address these needs, a growing number of successful gaming companies use Google’s web-scale analytics services to create personalized experiences for their players. They use telemetry and smart instrumentation to gain insight into how players engage with the game and to answer questions like: At what game level are players stuck? What virtual goods did they buy? And what's the best way to tailor the game to appeal to both casual and hardcore players?


A new reference architecture describes how you can collect, archive and analyze vast amounts of gaming telemetry data using Google Cloud Platform’s data analytics products. The architecture demonstrates two patterns for analyzing mobile game events:

  • Batch processing: This pattern helps you process game logs and other large files in a fast, parallelized manner. For example, leading mobile gaming company DeNA moved to BigQuery from Hadoop to get faster query responses for their log file analytics pipeline. In this GDC Lightning Talk video they explain the speed benefits of Google’s analytics tools and how the team was able to process large gaming datasets without the need to manage any infrastructure.
  • Real-time processing: Use this pattern when you want to understand what's happening in the game right now. Cloud Pub/Sub and Cloud Dataflow provide a fully managed way to perform a number of data-processing tasks like data cleansing and fraud detection in real-time. For example, you can highlight a player with maximum hit-points outside the valid range. Real-time processing is also a great way to continuously update dashboards of key game metrics, like how many active users are currently logged in or which in-game items are most popular.

Some Cloud Dataflow features are especially useful in a mobile context since messages may be delayed from the source due to mobile Internet connection issues or batteries running out. Cloud Dataflow's built-in session windowing functionality and triggers aggregate events based on the actual time they occurred (event time) as opposed to the time they're processed so that you can still group events together by user session even if there's a delay from the source.

But why choose between one or the other pattern? A key benefit of this architecture is that you can write your data pipeline processing once and execute it in either batch or streaming mode without modifying your codebase. So if you start processing your logs in batch mode, you can easily move to real-time processing in the future. This is an advantage of the high-level Cloud Dataflow model that was released as open source by Google.



Cloud Dataflow loads the processed data into one or more BigQuery tables. BigQuery is built for very large scale, and allows you to run aggregation queries against petabyte-scale datasets with fast response times. This is great for interactive analysis and data exploration, like the example screenshot above, where a simple BigQuery SQL query dynamically creates a Daily Active Users (DAU) graph using Google Cloud Datalab.


And what about player engagement and in-game dynamics? The BigQuery example above shows a bar chart of the ten toughest game bosses. It looks like boss10 killed players more than 75% of the time, much more than the next toughest. Perhaps it would make sense to lower the strength of this boss? Or maybe give the player some more powerful weapons? The choice is yours, but with this reference architecture you'll see the results of your changes straight away. Review the new reference architecture to jumpstart your data-driven quest to engage your players and make your games more successful, contact us, or sign up for a free trial of Google Cloud Platform to get started.

Further Reading and Additional Resources


- Posted by Oyvind Roti, Solutions Architect

Get your game on with YouTube during E3

We’re now only two weeks away from the start of the Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3) in Los Angeles, and you can get a front-row seat to the action with YouTube! We're inviting your favorite YouTube creators to show us what's cool and coming up next in the world of gaming, so you can experience every jaw-dropping demo and announcement LIVE.

We are building out a dedicated E3 YouTube hub where you will be able to follow all the live streams and trailers from the event, starting on Sunday, June 14, with the Nintendo World Championships, followed by the Bethesda press conference and the unveiling of the latest installment in the "Doom" series.

On Monday, June 15, at 9 a.m. PT, the wall-to-wall coverage will continue with a 12-hour live stream marathon, hosted by Geoff Keighley, brought to you by the movie “Self/less” - in theaters July 10. Geoff and YouTube gaming creators will bring you live coverage of press conferences from publishers like Xbox, Sony, EA and Ubisoft.


The program will include live “Let’s plays” of new titles, plus celebrity interviews along with other video game stars from the YouTube family. You'll also get live coverage from IGN and GameSpot, just like last year.

The play-by-play coverage will continue with hundreds of hours of live and on-demand content throughout the week directly from YouTube’s booth at E3, hosted by RoosterTeeth, along with our legendary Trailer Battle, Nintendo’s Digital Event and Treehouse Live, as well as other exclusive gaming content.

From live reactions and gaming demos, to trivia showdowns and “Meet the Makers” sessions with industry experts, the E3 YouTube hub will offer you the easiest place to explore the best of E3. Stay tuned starting on June 14.

Ryan Wyatt, global head of gaming content, recently watched "E3 Live on YouTube 2015 announcement video."

Source: YouTube Blog