Tag Archives: doodles

Sharing stories of service and sacrifice for Veterans Day


As a Surface Warfare Officer in the U.S. Navy, I remember spending multiple deployments out at sea, on a ship, sailing off the coast of Central and South America. The days were long, and the nights even longer, as we spent up to nine months away from friends and family. Although the deployments were sometimes dangerous, and we were away from home, we knew that it was part of the greater mission of protecting our country.

Millions of Americans throughout history have made a commitment to protect our country, and to better understand their impact and sacrifice, we’re amplifying their voices and sharing their stories. And we want you to help.

To do this, we’re partnering with StoryCorps, whose mission is to preserve and collect humanity’s stories. When you download the Storycorps app, you can interview a veteran in your life, and archive their oral history. Once you share your story, it will be sent to the Library of Congress where it will be kept for future generations to learn about their achievement and sacrifice.

Thanks to our partnership with Storycorps, today’s Doodle features stories from five veterans, including the first African-American woman to serve in the Coast Guard, and of an Army Sergeant who was reunited with the medic who saved his life ten years later. Guest animators Alicia and Emory Allen, both  children of veterans, lent their talents to create original artwork for the stories and the Doodle.

Nineteen-year-old YouTube creator Andy Fancher has spent the last three years telling veterans’ stories—he’s interviewed more than 70 WWII combat veterans for his YouTube channel, “Andy Fancher Presents.” Andy’s interest in documenting veterans’ stories started after he found a photograph of his late great-grandfather and realized his experience as a soldier hadn’t been preserved. Now, YouTubers like Andy can use the StoryCorps app to capture their own veteran stories.

Veterans Voices | Listening is Honoring

Veterans Day is also International Armistice Day, commemorating the end of World War I.  In partnership with the National World War I Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, MO, Google Arts and Culture has digitized and uploaded hundreds of historical documents, posters, and photographs. Now you can learn more about the origins of Veterans Day through exhibits about the armistice centennial or the significance of iconic WWI posters. You can also tour the museum’s grounds and interior, and explore the Museum in virtual reality with Google Cardboard tours narrated by the Museum’s curators and a retired Colonel.

Veterans are heroes among us, and these new efforts—across our platforms—can help to make sure that their legacy of service and sacrifice is preserved well into the future.

Finding community this Native American Heritage Month

I’m a member of the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians and the Tututni Band of Indians, as well as a descendent from the Southern Cheyenne and Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians. I’m proud of my Native American identity and after coming to Google as a Test Engineer in 2010, I joined the Google American Indian Network—an employee group passionate about Native American communities—to meet other Native people at Google. Since then, I’ve been able to connect with other Googlers to celebrate the diverse range of tribal cultures and communities across the country.


This Native American History Month, we’re highlighting the story of Robin Máxkii in the latest episode of “Search On,” Google’s original documentary series. When Robin was a teenager, she felt caught between worlds—her reservation in Wisconsin, and the urban sprawl of Houston. From organizing hackathons for the American Indian Science and Engineering Society to becoming a mentor for Google’s Made with Code program, Robin is carving her own path as a Native person in STEM and is bringing her community along with her.


Today’s Doodle honors another powerful Native American woman: Eastern Band Cherokee Indian woodcarver and educator Amanda Crowe, a prolific artist renowned for her expressive animal figures. Led by Doodler Lydia Nichols, the Doodle was created in collaboration with the Qualla Arts & Crafts Mutual as well as William “Bill” H. Crowe, Jr., woodcarver and nephew and former student of Amanda Crowe.

There are a few other ways we’re celebrating Native American History at Google: When you say “Hey Google, how do you celebrate Native American Heritage Month?” your Google Assistant will tell you a fact about Native American history and culture. Try telling it “Hey, Google, Happy Native American Heritage Month” as well.


On November 17th, Google volunteers will be working alongside the Oklahoma City Thunder and the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian to facilitate an educator training day in Oklahoma City.


And through Google’s CS First program, we’ll be working with local teachers to strengthen computer science in Native classrooms and to inspire and promote the improvement of teaching and learning about Native American history through NMAI’s Native Knowledge 360°.


The concept of walking in two worlds is one with which many can identify. At Google, I’ve brought my two worlds closer together, and I’m proud of the work we’ve done to share the experiences of Native American people with others.

Celebrate Halloween with Ghoul-gle

You know what they say: if you’ve got it, haunt it. Halloween is almost here and we want to make sure you’ve got what you need to celebrate with some help from Maps, Search and the Assistant.

Spookiest Spots

If you’re in the mood for a ghostly encounter, we’ve got you covered. Using historical Google Maps data, we’ve ranked 20 U.S. cities by their spook factor so you know exactly where to get your fill of restless spirits, haunted places, and inexplicable occurrences. Tap each link to see a list of some of the spookiest locations in your city, and check out the Street View imagery below to see what makes some of these places so spooktacular—if you dare 😱.

  1. New York

  2. Los Angeles

  3. Chicago

  4. Dallas

  5. Houston

  6. Washington D.C.

  7. San Francisco

  8. Atlanta

  9. Philadelphia

  10. Boston

  11. Seattle

  12. Phoenix

  13. Denver

  14. Orlando

  15. Minneapolis/St. Paul

  16. Detroit

  17. Portland

  18. Charlotte

  19. Sacramento

  20. Cleveland


Last-minute tips to get festive with your Google Assistant

Forget to pick up candy for trick-or-treaters? Still haven’t had a chance to get pumpkins to carve? Out of creative ideas on what to wear?


Whether you’re seeking last-minute costume inspiration, creepy sounds for your spooky soiree or monster facts to stump your friends and family, your Google Assistant is here to help just in the nick of time!  


Start by saying “Hey Google …”

  • “What should I be for Halloween?” (Take a guided quiz and let the Assistant help you pick out the perfect, unexpected costume.)

  • “Get directions to the nearest pumpkin patch.”

  • “Add Halloween candy to my shopping list.”

  • “Trick or treat.” (Enjoy a spooky experience with sound effects and guest appearances from famous monsters.)

  • “Share facts about monsters.” (Spoiler alert: did you know that people accused of witchcraft also found themselves accused of being werewolves?)

  • “What does a werewolf sound like?”

  • “What does a ghost sound like?”

  • “Share facts about monsters?”


Google Assistant Halloween

Pretty up some pumpkins

You might be carving out some time over the next day to create a gourd-eous masterpiece for your mantle or front porch. Here are some of the top pumpkin carving searches on Google Images to give you some ideas and how-to’s for a contemporary take on this classic Halloween decor:

A massive Doodle duel

Get your game on with our first-ever multiplayer, interactive Google Doodle. Host a session of “The Great Ghoul Duel” with up to seven friends and family via a custom invitation link or put your ghostly gaming powers to the test by competing with randomized players around the globe. Your goal is to collect as many spirit flames for your team as possible and bring them to home base before time expires. But BEWARE!, opposing teams can swipe your flames—and as a team collects more flames, their powers get stronger, including speed boosts, night vision and much more. Best of luck against your frightening foes!


Throwbacks and thank yous on our 20th birthday

On Google’s 20th birthday, Thursday is not just for throwbacks. It’s also for thank yous.

Google wouldn’t be what it is today if it weren’t for you: a curious crowd that comes to Search with all of life’s questions. Today’s birthday Doodle is dedicated to you, and the 20 years of searches that represent the inquisitiveness of people everywhere.

In today’s Doodle and hidden in Search for a limited time, you’ll be thrown back to (and flashed forward from) the days when “what is Y2K?” was your most burning tech question, Pluto was still a planet, and clip art was a critical part of visual communication.

Google Doodle Searches

The days when the music format du jour was the MP3 file and it was cutting-edge to watch a DVD. When you had to choose a screen name before hopping into a chat room.

All the kids had to have a digital pet, and girls were rocking the latest butterfly clip styles in their hair. Everyone was keepin' it real and gettin' jiggy wit it on the dance floor. And googol was just a really big number.

You can also peer back into the last two decades through the lens of trends by visiting 20years.withgoogle.com and seeing many of the people, pop culture and pizza (yes, pizza) that inspired your searches from 1998 to now.

We hope this jaunt down memory lane reminds you of your own magical moments when you found just what you were looking for with Google. For the next 20 years and beyond: Search on.

Source: Search


Premiering now: The first-ever VR Google Doodle starring illusionist & film director Georges Méliès

In 1902, George Méliès sent his audience on a trip to the moon in his adventure film “Le Voyage dans la Lune.” That was more than half a century before humans ever landed on the moon, and more than a century before people around the world started blasting into space via virtual reality technology.

georges-melies-doodle.jpg

Méliès pioneered film techniques that immersed people in unfamiliar experiences—an early precursor to today’s virtual reality. So it’s only fitting that today’s first-ever VR-enabled and 360° video Google Doodle celebrates Méliès, and debuts on the anniversary of the release of one of his greatest cinematic masterpieces in 1912: “À la conquête du pôle” (“The Conquest of the Pole). Created in collaboration with the Google Spotlight Stories, Google Arts & Culture, and Cinémathèque Française teams (as well as production partners Nexus Studios), the Doodle represents some of the iconic techniques and styles found in Méliès’ films, including strong colors, engaging storylines and optical effects.

melies_dance.png

An illusionist before he was a filmmaker, Méliès discovered and exploited basic camera techniques to transport viewers into magical worlds and zany stories. He saw film and cameras as more than just tools to capture images, he saw them as vehicles to transport and truly immerse people into a story. He played around with stop motion, slow motion, dissolves, fade-outs, superimpositions, and double exposures.

“Méliès was fascinated by new technologies and was constantly on the lookout for new inventions. I imagine he would have been delighted to live in our era, which is so rich with immersive cinema, digital effects, and spectacular images on screen,” says Laurent Manonni, Director of Heritage at The Cinémathèque Française.  “I have no doubt he would have been flattered to find himself in the limelight via today’s very first virtual reality / 360° video Google Doodle, propelled around the world thanks to a new medium with boundless magical powers.”

Enjoy the full Google Doodle VR experience on mobile, Cardboard or Daydream by downloading the Google Spotlight Stories app on Google Play or in the App Store. You can can also experience the Doodle without a headset as a 360° video on the Google homepage for 48 hours or the Google Spotlight Stories YouTube Channel anytime. Bon voyage on your fantastical VR adventure to the moon!

I’m Feeling Earthy: Earth Day trends and more

It’s Earth Day—take a walk with us.

First, let’s dig into issues taking root in Search. Ahead of Earth Day, “solar energy,” “drought” and “endangered species” climbed in popularity this week. Meanwhile, people are looking for ways their own actions can make a positive impact. The top “how to recycle” searches were for plastic, paper, batteries, plastic bags, and styrofoam. And around the world, trending queries about Earth Day were “how many trees will be saved by recycling?” and “which type of plastic is more friendly to the environment?”  

To explore some of the other searches that are blooming for Earth Day, take a look at our trends page.

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In our corner of the world, Earth Day celebrations started on Google Earth’s first birthday (tweet at @googleearth with #ImFeelingEarthy and see where it takes you!). The party continues today with a special tribute to Jane Goodall in today’s Doodle, and kids inspired by the Doodle can create their own Google logo, thanks to our partnership with World Wildlife Fund. And while we’re feeling extra Earthy this week, the environment is important to our work all year long—here’s what we’re doing for our operations, our surroundings, our customers, and our community.

Her voice helped others find theirs: a Doodle to honor Maya Angelou

Dr. Maya Angelou used her voice to touch the lives of millions around the globe. As an author, poet, memoirist and activist, her teachings, writings and actions encouraged others to discover their own voices and inspire change.

Today’s Doodle celebrates Dr. Angelou on what would have been her 90th birthday, and commemorates one of her most influential tools—her words. Set to her poem “Still I Rise,” the Doodle includes archived audio from Maya Angelou herself, and narration from other individuals she’s inspired—Oprah Winfrey, Alicia Keys, America Ferrera, Laverne Cox, Martina McBride, as well as her only son, Guy Johnson.

Dr. Angelou’s incredible personal journey started with tragedy in her early life: a sexual assault at age seven that rendered her mute for five years. During those years, books and poetry became her solace and constant companions, eventually helping her find her voice and embark upon an intellectual and creative journey.

In 1969, the success of her first book, “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings,” brought her mainstream attention as an author. Six other autobiographical works followed, in addition to poetry, children’s literature, and non-fiction. Through her works, Dr. Angelou gave a voice to millions. She championed women’s rights and gender equality. She redefined black beauty and celebrated African-American oral traditions. She advocated against war and campaigned for universal peace.

Though we honor Dr. Maya Angelou's courage and compassion today, her words will continue to awaken hope around the world for years to come.

Celebrating women’s voices around the world on International Women’s Day

As a woman, a mother to an amazing daughter, a sister, a wife, a leader and a passionate women's rights advocate, it’s been incredible to bear witness to the groundswell of support for gender equality this past year. We’ve watched women find their voices, and seen the world begin to listen more actively.

In fact, over the last year, the world has searched for "gender equality" more than ever before. People are not just asking questions; they are looking for ways to understand inequality, seek inspiration, speak out, and take action. This International Women’s Day, we’re recognizing what the world is searching for, and celebrating the strong, courageous women who are pushing us toward a more equal future.

On our homepage today, we’re commemorating women whose stories are not often heard. Through an interactive Doodle, we’re highlighting the voices of 12 artists from all around the world, each sharing a personal story of a moment or event that impacted her life. Each artist featured in the Doodle tells a unique story, yet the themes are universal, reminding us how much we have in common.

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To make it easier to find women-led businesses on Google Maps and Search, we launched a new attribute that highlights local businesses that are owned, led, or founded by women. Now you can find more businesses like Reaching Out Teahouse in communities across the world.

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Here are more ways you can get involved and celebrate International Women’s Day:

  • Tune in on YouTube at 11:45 a.m. ET tomorrow, March 8 to hear from Oprah Winfrey, Storm Reid, Gugu Mbatha-Raw and director Ava DuVernay of Disney’s “A Wrinkle in Time” for a special International Women’s Day Talks at Google event. The cast will be joined by 40 teen girls from Girls Inc as a part of a Made with Code event. 
  • Explore top-searched trends around women at g.co/womensday.
  • Celebrate with your Google Assistant by asking, "Hey Google, tell me inspiring quotes from women.” 
  • Support the women behind great apps and games as well as strong female protagonists in games, movies, TV and books on theGoogle Play store
  • Follow the conversation at @WomenTechmakers as over 20,000 women in tech connect and inspire one another during our annual Women Techmakers International Women's Day events in 52 countries. 
  • Watch the Merrell Twins’ new YouTube series “Project Upgrade,” premiering Saturday, March 10. Follow two YouTubers as they build and code their own product, all the while showing girls the unlimited possibilities of CS and STEM.

Here’s to supporting women everywhere in the search for a more equal future.

Source: Search


Celebrating women’s voices around the world on International Women’s Day

As a woman, a mother to an amazing daughter, a sister, a wife, a leader and a passionate women's rights advocate, it’s been incredible to bear witness to the groundswell of support for gender equality this past year. We’ve watched women find their voices, and seen the world begin to listen more actively.

In fact, over the last year, the world has searched for "gender equality" more than ever before. People are not just asking questions; they are looking for ways to understand inequality, seek inspiration, speak out, and take action. This International Women’s Day, we’re recognizing what the world is searching for, and celebrating the strong, courageous women who are pushing us toward a more equal future.

On our homepage today, we’re commemorating women whose stories are not often heard. Through an interactive Doodle, we’re highlighting the voices of 12 artists from all around the world, each sharing a personal story of a moment or event that impacted her life. Each artist featured in the Doodle tells a unique story, yet the themes are universal, reminding us how much we have in common.

High Res CTA GIF.gif

To make it easier to find women-led businesses on Google Maps and Search, we launched a new attribute that highlights local businesses that are owned, led, or founded by women. Now you can find more businesses like Reaching Out Teahouse in communities across the world.

attribute

Here are more ways you can get involved and celebrate International Women’s Day:

  • Tune in on YouTube at 11:45 a.m. ET tomorrow, March 8 to hear from Oprah Winfrey, Storm Reid, Gugu Mbatha-Raw and director Ava DuVernay of Disney’s “A Wrinkle in Time” for a special International Women’s Day Talks at Google event. The cast will be joined by 40 teen girls from Girls Inc as a part of a Made with Code event. 
  • Explore top-searched trends around women at g.co/womensday.
  • Celebrate with your Google Assistant by asking, "Hey Google, tell me quotes from inspiring women.” 
  • Support the women behind great apps and games as well as strong female protagonists in games, movies, TV and books on theGoogle Play store
  • Follow the conversation at @WomenTechmakers as over 20,000 women in tech connect and inspire one another during our annual Women Techmakers International Women's Day events in 52 countries. 
  • Watch the Merrell Twins’ new YouTube series “Project Upgrade,” premiering Saturday, March 10. Follow two YouTubers as they build and code their own product, all the while showing girls the unlimited possibilities of CS and STEM.

Here’s to supporting women everywhere in the search for a more equal future.

Source: Search


Happy Lunar New Year! Wag hello to the Year of the Dog

Today marks Lunar New Year. Across the world, people are celebrating the end of the year of the Rooster and the start of the Year of the Dog.


Whether you're enjoying tteokguk with family or handing out red envelopes for good luck, there are many ways to celebrate the holiday. According to Google Trends, Malaysia, Thailand and Vietnam are among the countries searching the most for “red envelopes.” Meanwhile, top searched foods are nian gao, dumplings, pineapple tart, rice cake and peanut cookies.


Since we’re dog people here at Google, we sniffed out a few non-traditional ways to celebrate. Howl you be spending the Lunar New Year?


Try your paw at drawing

In the last year, people have drawn more than 3 million doodles of dogs in Quick, Draw!—a fun game that uses neural networks to try to recognize your drawings. In honor of Lunar New Year, our team snuck in a special version of Quick, Draw! withDog Face on Google -related items. Put your doodling skills to the test.

Quick Draw Dog

If you’re more of a data breed, you can check out the pawsome dog doodles from around the world in a special Lunar New Year version of Facets Dive, a tool that visualizes large sets of data (in this case ruff-ly 140,000 dogs that people have drawn in Quick, Draw!).

The dogs of Street View

Lunar Year of the Dog means dogs are everywhere–including on Google Street View! We’ve had a lot of fun finding furry friends all around, from this one strolling through New York’s Central Park to thisDog Face on Google hanging out in a small alley in San Sebastian, to our friend here enjoying the Coastal Walk in Sydney. Scroll through our favorites below, or find dogs on Street View in your own neighborhood.

Photos of your pup

In Google Photos, you can create a movie of the dog in your life—select "Doggie Movie" among the movie themes and Google Photos will stitch together photos of the dog. Photos also lets you search for your dog using a dog emoji.


All dogs go to the Games

We couldn’t let the moment pass without a Doodle (or two!). This cheerful pup on our homepage in many countries around the world isn’t just welcoming the New Year—it’s also celebrating the Doodle Snow Games!
Lunar New Year Ski Lift Doodle 2018

In places not tuning into the Doodle Snow Games, you might see a different Doodle—also featured at the top of this post.

No matter how you celebrate or what language you say it in, happy Lunar New Year!