Tag Archives: developers

Get your users where they need to go on any platform with Google Maps URLs

Last week at Google I/O we announced Google Maps URLs, a new way for developers to link directly to Google Maps from any app. Over one billion people use the Google Maps apps and sites every month to get information about the world, and now we're making it easier to leverage the power of our maps from any app or site.

Why URLs?

Maps can be important to help your users get things done, but we know sometimes maps don't need to be a core part of your app or site. Sometimes you just need the ability to complete your users’ journey—including pointing them to a specific location. Maybe they're ready to buy from you and need to find your nearest store, or they want to set up a meeting place with other users. All of these can be done easily in Google Maps already.

What you can do is use Google Maps URLs to link into Google Maps and trigger the functionality you or your users need automatically. Google Maps URLs are not new. You've probably noticed that copying our URLs out of a browser works—on some platforms. While we have Android Intents and an iOS URL Scheme, they only work on their native platforms. Not only is that more work for developers, it means any multi-user functionality is limited to users on that same platform.

Cross platform

So to start, we needed a universal URL scheme we could support cross-platform—Android, iOS, and web. A messaging app user should be able to share a location to meet up with their friend without worrying about whether the message recipient is on Android or iOS. And for something as easy as that, developers shouldn't have to reimplement the same feature with two different libraries either.

So when a Google Maps URL is opened, it will be handled by the Google Maps app installed on the user's device, whatever device that is. If Google Maps for Android or iOS is available, that's where the user will be taken. Otherwise, Google Maps will open in a browser.

Easy to use

Getting started is simple—just replace some values in the URL based on what you're trying to accomplish. That means we made it easy to construct URLs programmatically. Here are a few examples to get you started:

Say someone has finished booking a place to stay and need figure out how to get there or see what restaurants are nearby:
https://www.google.com/maps/search/?api=1&query=sushi+near+94043
The query parameter does what it says: plugs a query in. Here we've specified a place, but if you do the same link with no location it will search near the user clicking it. Try it out: click here for sushi near you.

This is similar to our query above, but this time we got back a single result, so it gets additional details shown on the page:
google.com/maps/search/?api=1&query=shoreline+amphitheatre
The api parameter (mandatory) specifies the version of Maps URLs that you're using. We're launching version 1.


Or if a user has set up their fitness app and want to try out a new route on their bike:
www.google.com/maps/dir/?api=1&destination=stevens+creek+trail&travelmode=bicycling&dir_action=navigate
We can specify the travelmode to bicycling, destination to a nearby bike trail, and we're done!

And we can also open StreetView directly with a focus of our choice to give a real sense of what a place is like:
www.google.com/maps/@?api=1&map_action=pano&viewpoint=36.0665,-112.0906&heading=85&pitch=10&fov=75
The viewpoint is a LatLng coordinate we want to get imagery for, and heading, pitch, and fov allows you to specify exactly where to look.

Need more functionality?

Google Maps URLs are great to help your users accomplish some tasks in Google Maps. However, when you need more flexibility, customization, or control, we recommend integrating Google Maps into your app or site instead. This is where our more powerful Google Maps APIs come into play. With our feature-rich range of APIs, you can access full functionality and can control your camera, draw shapes on the map, or style your maps to match your apps, brand, or just for better UI. And if you want to go beyond the map we have metadata on Places, images, and much more.

Learn more

When you're happy to delegate the heavy lifting and make use of the Google Maps app for your needs, Maps URLs are for you. Check out our new documentation.

Thank you for using Google Maps URLs and the Google Maps APIs! Be sure to share your feedback or any issues in the issue tracker.

author image
Posted by Joel Kalmanowicz, Product Manager, Google Maps APIs

All 101 announcements from Google I/O ‘17

It’s been a busy three days here in Mountain View, as more than 7,000 developers joined us at Shoreline Amphitheatre for this year’s Google I/O. From AI to VR, and everything in between, here’s an exhaustive—we mean that—recap of everything we announced.

101-IO-headers_1.jpg

1. The Google Assistant is already available on more than 100 million devices!
2. Soon, with Google Lens—a new way for computers to “see”—you’ll be able to learn more about and take action on the things around you, while you’re in a conversation with your Assistant.
3. We’ve brought your Google Assistant to iPhones.
4. Call me maybe? With new hands-free calling on Google Home, you’ll be able to make calls with the Assistant to landlines and mobile numbers in U.S. and Canada for free.
5. You can now type to your Google Assistant on eligible Android phones and iPhones.
6. Bonjour. Later this year people in Australia, Canada, France, Germany and Japan will be able to give the Assistant on Google Home a try.
7. And Hallo. Soon the Assistant will roll out to eligible Android phones in Brazilian Portuguese, French, German and Japanese. By the end of the year the Assistant will support Italian, Korean and Spanish.
8. We’re also adding transactions and payments to your Assistant on phones—soon you can order and pay for food and more, with your Assistant.  
9. With 70+ home automation partners, you can water your lawn and check the status of your smoke alarm with the Assistant on Google Home and phones.
10. Soon you’ll get proactive notifications for reminders, flight delays and traffic alerts with the Assistant on Google Home and phones. With multi-user support, you can control the type of notifications to fit your daily life.
12. Listen to all your favorite tunes. We’ve added Deezer and Soundcloud as partners, plus Spotify’s free music offering coming soon.  
12. Bluetooth support is coming to Google Home, so you can play any audio from your iOS or Android device.
13. Don’t know the name of a song, but remember a few of the lyrics? Now you can just ask the Assistant to “play that song that goes like...” and list some of the lyrics.
14. Use your voice to play your favorite shows and more from 20+ new partners (HBO NOW, CBS All Access, and HGTV) straight to your TV.
15. With visual responses from your Assistant on TVs with Chromecast, you’ll be able to see Assistant answers on the biggest screen in your house.
16. You can stream with your voice with Google Home on 50 million Cast and Cast-enabled devices.
17. For developers, we're bringing Actions on Google to the Assistant on phones—on both Android and iOS. Soon you’ll find conversation apps for the Assistant that help you do things like shopping for clothes or ordering food from a lengthy menu.
18. Also for developers, we’re adding ways for you to get data on your app's usage and performance, with a new console.
19. We’re rolling out an app directory, so people can find apps from developers directly in the Google Assistant.
20. People can now also create shortcuts for apps in the Google Assistant, so instead of saying "Ok Google, ask Forecaster Joe what's the surf report for the Outer Banks," someone can just say their personal shortcut, like "Ok Google, is the surf up?"
21. Last month we previewed the Google Assistant SDK, and now we’re updating it with hotword support, so developers can build devices that are triggered by a simple "Ok Google."
22. We’re also adding to the SDK the ability to have both timers and alarms.
23. And finally, we’re launching our first developer competition for Actions on Google.

AI, ML and Cloud

24. With the addition of Smart Reply to Gmail on Android and iOS, we’re using machine learning to make responding to emails easier for more than a billion Gmail users.
25. New Cloud TPUs—the second generation of our custom hardware built specifically for machine learning—are optimized for training ML models as well as running them, and will be available in the Google Compute Engine.
26. And to speed up the pace of open machine-learning research, we’re introducing the TensorFlow Research Cloud, a cluster of 1,000 Cloud TPUs available for free to top researchers.
27. Google for Jobs is our initiative to use our products to help people find work, using machine learning. Through Google Search and the Cloud Jobs API, we’re committed to helping companies connect with potential employees and job seekers with available opportunities.
28. The Google Cloud Jobs API is helping customers like Johnson & Johnson recruit the best candidates. Only months after launching, they’ve found that job seekers are 18 percent more likely to apply on its career page now they are using Cloud Jobs API.
29. With Google.ai, we’re pulling all our AI initiatives together to put more powerful computing tools and research in the hands of researchers, developers and companies. We’ve already seen promising research in the fields of pathology and DNA research.
30. We must go deeper. AutoML uses neural nets to design neural nets, potentially cutting down the time-intensive process of setting up an AI system, and helping non-experts build AI for their particular needs.
31. We’ve partnered with world-class medical researchers to explore how machine learning could help improve care for patients, avoid costly incidents and save lives.
32. We introduced a new Google Cloud Platform service called Google Cloud IoT Core, which makes it easy for Google Cloud customers to gain business insights through secure device connections to our rich data and analytics tools.

101-IO-headers_3.jpg

33. We first launched Google Photos two years ago, and now it has more than 500 million monthly users.
34. Every day more than 1.2 billion photos and videos are uploaded to Google Photos.
35. Soon Google Photos will give you sharing suggestions by selecting the right photos, and suggesting who you should send them to based on who was in them
36. Shared libraries will let you effortlessly share photos with a specific person. You can share your full photo library, or photos of certain people or from a certain date forward.
37. With photo books, once you select the photos, Google Photos can curate an album for you with all the best shots, which you can then print for $9.99 (20-page softcover) or $19.99 (20-page hardcover), in the U.S. for now.
38. Google Lens is coming to Photos later this year, so you’ll be able to look back on your photos to learn more or take action—like find more information about a painting from a photo you took in a museum.

101-IO-headers_4.jpg

39. We reached 2 billion monthly active devices on Android!
40. Android O, coming later this year, is getting improvements to “vitals” like battery life and performance, and bringing more fluid experiences to your smaller screen, from improved notifications to autofill.
41. With picture-in-picture in Android O, you can do two tasks simultaneously, like checking your calendar while on a Duo video call.
42. Smart text selection in Android O improves copy and paste to recognize entities on the screen—like a complete address—so you can easily select text with a double tap, and even bring up an app like Maps to help navigate you there.
43. Our emoji are going through a major design refresh in Android O.
44. For developers, the first beta release of Android O is now available.
45. We introduced Google Play Protect—a set of security protections for Android that’s always on and automatically takes action to keep your data and device safe, so you don’t have to lift a finger.
46. The new Find My Device app helps you locate, ring, lock and erase your lost Android devices—phones, tablets, and even watches.
47. We previewed a new initiative aimed at getting computing into the hands of more people on entry-level Android devices. Internally called Android Go, it’s designed to be relevant for people who have limited data connectivity and speak multiple languages.
48. Android Auto is now supported by 300 car models, and Android Auto users have grown 10x since last year.
49. With partners in 70+ countries, we’re seeing 1 million new Android TV device activations every two months, doubling the number of users since last year.
50. We’ve refreshed the look and feel of the Android TV homescreen, making it easy for people to find, preview and watch content provided by apps.
51. With new partners like Emporio Armani, Movado and New Balance, Android Wear now powers almost 50 different watches.
52. We shared an early look at TensorFlow Lite, which is designed to help developers take advantage of machine learning to improve the user experience on Android.
53. As part of TensorFlow Lite, we’re working on a Neural Network API that TensorFlow can take advantage of to accelerate computation.
54. An incredible 82 billion apps were downloaded from Google Play in the last year.
55. We honored 12 Google Play Awards winners—apps and games that give their fans particularly delightful and memorable experiences.
56. We’re now previewing Android Studio 3.0, focused on speed and Android platform support.
57. We’re making Kotlin an officially supported programming language in Android, with the goal of making Android development faster and more fun.
58. And we’ll be collaborating with JetBrains, the creators of Kotlin, to move Kotlin into a nonprofit foundation.
59. Android Instant Apps are now open to all developers, so anyone can build and publish apps that can be run without requiring installation.
60. Thousands of developers from 60+ countries are now using Android Things to create connected devices that have easy access to services like the Google Assistant, TensorFlow and more.
61. Android Things will be fully released later this year.
62. Over the last year, the number of Google Play developers with more than 1 million installs grew 35 percent.
63. The number of people buying on Google Play grew by almost 30 percent this past year.
64. We’re updating the Google Play Console with new features to help developers improve your app's performance and quality, and grow your business on Google Play.
65. We’re also adding a new subscriptions dashboard in the Play Console, bringing together data like new subscribers and churn so you can make better business decisions.
66. To make it easier and more fun for developers to write robust apps, we announced a guide to Android app architecture along with a preview of Architecture Components.  
67. We’re adding four new tools to the Complications API for Android Wear, to help give users more informative watch faces.
68. Also for Android Wear, we’re open sourcing some components in the Android Support Library.

101-IO-headers_5.jpg

69. More Daydream-ready phones are coming soon, including the Samsung Galaxy S8 and S8+, LG’s next flagship phone, and devices from Motorola and ASUS.
70. Today there are 150+ applications available for Daydream.
71. More than 2 million students have gone on virtual reality Expeditions using Google Cardboard, with more than 600 tours available.
72. We’re expanding Daydream to support standalone VR headsets, which don't require a phone or PC. HTC VIVE and Lenovo are both working on devices, based on a Qualcomm reference design.
73. Standalone Daydream headsets will include WorldSense, a new technology based on Tango which enables the headset to track your precise movements in space, without any extra sensors.
74. The next smartphone with Tango technology will be the ASUS ZenFone AR, available this summer.
75. We worked with the Google Maps team to create a new Visual Positioning Service (VPS) for developers, which helps devices quickly and accurately understand their location indoors.
76. We’re bringing AR to the classroom with Expeditions AR, launching with a Pioneer Program this fall.
77. We previewed Euphrates, the latest release of Daydream, which will let you capture what you’re seeing and cast your virtual world right onto the screen in your living room, coming later this year.
78. A new tool for VR developers, Instant Preview, lets developers make changes on a computer and see them reflected on a headset in seconds, not minutes.
79. Seurat is a new technology that makes it possible to render high-fidelity scenes on mobile VR headsets in real time. Somebody warn Cameron Frye.
80. We’re releasing an experimental build of Chromium with an augmented reality API, to help bring AR to the web.

101-IO-headers_6.jpg

81. Soon you’ll be able to watch and control 360-degree YouTube videos and live streams on your TV, and use your game controller or remote to pan around an immersive experience.
82. Super Chat lets fans interact directly with YouTube creators during live streams by purchasing highlighted chat messages that stay pinned to the top of the chat window. We previewed a developer integration that showed how the Super Chat API can be used to trigger actions in the real world—such as turning the lights on and off in a creator's apartment.
83. A new feature in the YouTube VR app will soon let people watch and discuss videos together.

101-IO-headers_7.jpg

84. We announced that we will make Fabric’s Crashlytics the primary crash reporting product in Firebase.
85.  We’re bringing phone number authentication to Firebase, working closely with the Fabric Digits team, so your users can sign in to your apps with their phone numbers.
86. New Firebase Performance Monitoring will help diagnose issues resulting from poorly performing code or challenging network conditions.
87. We’ve improved Firebase Cloud Messaging.
88. For game developers, we’ve built Game Loop support & FPS monitoring into Test Lab for Android, allowing you to evaluate your game’s frame rate before you deploy.
89. We’ve taken some big steps to open source many of our Firebase SDKs on GitHub.
90. We’re expanding Firebase Hosting to integrate with Cloud Functions, letting you can do things like send a notification when a user signs up or automatically create thumbnails when an image is uploaded to Cloud Storage.
91. Developers interested in testing the cutting edge of our products can now sign up for a Firebase Alpha program.
92. We’re adding two new certifications for web developers, in addition to the Associate Android Developer Certification announced last year.
93. We opened an Early Access Program for Chatbase, a new analytics tool in API.ai that helps developers monitor the activity in their chatbots.
94. We’ve completely redesigned AdMob, which helps developers promote, measure and monetize mobile apps, with a new user flow and publisher controls.
95. AdMob is also now integrated with Google Analytics for Firebase, giving developers a complete picture of ads revenue, mediation revenue and in-app purchase revenue in one place.
96. With a new Google Payment API, developers can enable easy in-app or online payments for customers who already have credit and debit cards stored on Google properties.
97. We’re introducing new ways for merchants to engage and reward customers, including the new Card Linked Offers API.
98. We’re introducing a new options for ads placement through Universal App Campaigns to help users discover your apps in the Google Play Store.
99. An update to Smart Bidding strategies in Universal App Campaigns helps you gain high-value users of your apps—like players who level-up in your game or the loyal travelers who book several flights a month.
100. A new program, App Attribution Partners, integrates data into AdWords from seven third-party measurement providers so you can more easily find and take action on insights about how users engage with your app.
101. Firebase partnered up with Google Cloud to offer free storage for up to 10 gigabytes in BigQuery so you can quickly, easily and affordably run queries on it.

That’s all, folks! Thanks to everyone who joined us at I/O this year, whether in person, at an I/O Extended event or via the live stream. See you in 2018.

All 101 announcements from Google I/O ‘17

It’s been a busy three days here in Mountain View, as more than 7,000 developers joined us at Shoreline Amphitheatre for this year’s Google I/O. From AI to VR, and everything in between, here’s an exhaustive—we mean that—recap of everything we announced.

101-IO-headers_1.jpg

1. The Google Assistant is already available on more than 100 million devices!
2. Soon, with Google Lens—a new way for computers to “see”—you’ll be able to learn more about and take action on the things around you, while you’re in a conversation with your Assistant.
3. We’ve brought your Google Assistant to iPhones.
4. Call me maybe? With new hands-free calling on Google Home, you’ll be able to make calls with the Assistant to landlines and mobile numbers in U.S. and Canada for free.
5. You can now type to your Google Assistant on eligible Android phones and iPhones.
6. Bonjour. Later this year people in Australia, Canada, France, Germany and Japan will be able to give the Assistant on Google Home a try.
7. And Hallo. Soon the Assistant will roll out to eligible Android phones in Brazilian Portuguese, French, German and Japanese. By the end of the year the Assistant will support Italian, Korean and Spanish.
8. We’re also adding transactions and payments to your Assistant on phones—soon you can order and pay for food and more, with your Assistant.  
9. With 70+ home automation partners, you can water your lawn and check the status of your smoke alarm with the Assistant on Google Home and phones.
10. Soon you’ll get proactive notifications for reminders, flight delays and traffic alerts with the Assistant on Google Home and phones. With multi-user support, you can control the type of notifications to fit your daily life.
12. Listen to all your favorite tunes. We’ve added Deezer and Soundcloud as partners, plus Spotify’s free music offering coming soon.  
12. Bluetooth support is coming to Google Home, so you can play any audio from your iOS or Android device.
13. Don’t know the name of a song, but remember a few of the lyrics? Now you can just ask the Assistant to “play that song that goes like...” and list some of the lyrics.
14. Use your voice to play your favorite shows and more from 20+ new partners (HBO NOW, CBS All Access, and HGTV) straight to your TV.
15. With visual responses from your Assistant on TVs with Chromecast, you’ll be able to see Assistant answers on the biggest screen in your house.
16. You can stream with your voice with Google Home on 50 million Cast and Cast-enabled devices.
17. For developers, we're bringing Actions on Google to the Assistant on phones—on both Android and iOS. Soon you’ll find conversation apps for the Assistant that help you do things like shopping for clothes or ordering food from a lengthy menu.
18. Also for developers, we’re adding ways for you to get data on your app's usage and performance, with a new console.
19. We’re rolling out an app directory, so people can find apps from developers directly in the Google Assistant.
20. People can now also create shortcuts for apps in the Google Assistant, so instead of saying "Ok Google, ask Forecaster Joe what's the surf report for the Outer Banks," someone can just say their personal shortcut, like "Ok Google, is the surf up?"
21. Last month we previewed the Google Assistant SDK, and now we’re updating it with hotword support, so developers can build devices that are triggered by a simple "Ok Google."
22. We’re also adding to the SDK the ability to have both timers and alarms.
23. And finally, we’re launching our first developer competition for Actions on Google.

AI, ML and Cloud

24. With the addition of Smart Reply to Gmail on Android and iOS, we’re using machine learning to make responding to emails easier for more than a billion Gmail users.
25. New Cloud TPUs—the second generation of our custom hardware built specifically for machine learning—are optimized for training ML models as well as running them, and will be available in the Google Compute Engine.
26. And to speed up the pace of open machine-learning research, we’re introducing the TensorFlow Research Cloud, a cluster of 1,000 Cloud TPUs available for free to top researchers.
27. Google for Jobs is our initiative to use our products to help people find work, using machine learning. Through Google Search and the Cloud Jobs API, we’re committed to helping companies connect with potential employees and job seekers with available opportunities.
28. The Google Cloud Jobs API is helping customers like Johnson & Johnson recruit the best candidates. Only months after launching, they’ve found that job seekers are 18 percent more likely to apply on its career page now they are using Cloud Jobs API.
29. With Google.ai, we’re pulling all our AI initiatives together to put more powerful computing tools and research in the hands of researchers, developers and companies. We’ve already seen promising research in the fields of pathology and DNA research.
30. We must go deeper. AutoML uses neural nets to design neural nets, potentially cutting down the time-intensive process of setting up an AI system, and helping non-experts build AI for their particular needs.
31. We’ve partnered with world-class medical researchers to explore how machine learning could help improve care for patients, avoid costly incidents and save lives.
32. We introduced a new Google Cloud Platform service called Google Cloud IoT Core, which makes it easy for Google Cloud customers to gain business insights through secure device connections to our rich data and analytics tools.

101-IO-headers_3.jpg

33. We first launched Google Photos two years ago, and now it has more than 500 million monthly users.
34. Every day more than 1.2 billion photos and videos are uploaded to Google Photos.
35. Soon Google Photos will give you sharing suggestions by selecting the right photos, and suggesting who you should send them to based on who was in them
36. Shared libraries will let you effortlessly share photos with a specific person. You can share your full photo library, or photos of certain people or from a certain date forward.
37. With photo books, once you select the photos, Google Photos can curate an album for you with all the best shots, which you can then print for $9.99 (20-page softcover) or $19.99 (20-page hardcover), in the U.S. for now.
38. Google Lens is coming to Photos later this year, so you’ll be able to look back on your photos to learn more or take action—like find more information about a painting from a photo you took in a museum.

101-IO-headers_4.jpg

39. We reached 2 billion monthly active devices on Android!
40. Android O, coming later this year, is getting improvements to “vitals” like battery life and performance, and bringing more fluid experiences to your smaller screen, from improved notifications to autofill.
41. With picture-in-picture in Android O, you can do two tasks simultaneously, like checking your calendar while on a Duo video call.
42. Smart text selection in Android O improves copy and paste to recognize entities on the screen—like a complete address—so you can easily select text with a double tap, and even bring up an app like Maps to help navigate you there.
43. Our emoji are going through a major design refresh in Android O.
44. For developers, the first beta release of Android O is now available.
45. We introduced Google Play Protect—a set of security protections for Android that’s always on and automatically takes action to keep your data and device safe, so you don’t have to lift a finger.
46. The new Find My Device app helps you locate, ring, lock and erase your lost Android devices—phones, tablets, and even watches.
47. We previewed a new initiative aimed at getting computing into the hands of more people on entry-level Android devices. Internally called Android Go, it’s designed to be relevant for people who have limited data connectivity and speak multiple languages.
48. Android Auto is now supported by 300 car models, and Android Auto users have grown 10x since last year.
49. With partners in 70+ countries, we’re seeing 1 million new Android TV device activations every two months, doubling the number of users since last year.
50. We’ve refreshed the look and feel of the Android TV homescreen, making it easy for people to find, preview and watch content provided by apps.
51. With new partners like Emporio Armani, Movado and New Balance, Android Wear now powers almost 50 different watches.
52. We shared an early look at TensorFlow Lite, which is designed to help developers take advantage of machine learning to improve the user experience on Android.
53. As part of TensorFlow Lite, we’re working on a Neural Network API that TensorFlow can take advantage of to accelerate computation.
54. An incredible 82 billion apps were downloaded from Google Play in the last year.
55. We honored 12 Google Play Awards winners—apps and games that give their fans particularly delightful and memorable experiences.
56. We’re now previewing Android Studio 3.0, focused on speed and Android platform support.
57. We’re making Kotlin an officially supported programming language in Android, with the goal of making Android development faster and more fun.
58. And we’ll be collaborating with JetBrains, the creators of Kotlin, to move Kotlin into a nonprofit foundation.
59. Android Instant Apps are now open to all developers, so anyone can build and publish apps that can be run without requiring installation.
60. Thousands of developers from 60+ countries are now using Android Things to create connected devices that have easy access to services like the Google Assistant, TensorFlow and more.
61. Android Things will be fully released later this year.
62. Over the last year, the number of Google Play developers with more than 1 million installs grew 35 percent.
63. The number of people buying on Google Play grew by almost 30 percent this past year.
64. We’re updating the Google Play Console with new features to help developers improve your app's performance and quality, and grow your business on Google Play.
65. We’re also adding a new subscriptions dashboard in the Play Console, bringing together data like new subscribers and churn so you can make better business decisions.
66. To make it easier and more fun for developers to write robust apps, we announced a guide to Android app architecture along with a preview of Architecture Components.  
67. We’re adding four new tools to the Complications API for Android Wear, to help give users more informative watch faces.
68. Also for Android Wear, we’re open sourcing some components in the Android Support Library.

101-IO-headers_5.jpg

69. More Daydream-ready phones are coming soon, including the Samsung Galaxy S8 and S8+, LG’s next flagship phone, and devices from Motorola and ASUS.
70. Today there are 150+ applications available for Daydream.
71. More than 2 million students have gone on virtual reality Expeditions using Google Cardboard, with more than 600 tours available.
72. We’re expanding Daydream to support standalone VR headsets, which don't require a phone or PC. HTC VIVE and Lenovo are both working on devices, based on a Qualcomm reference design.
73. Standalone Daydream headsets will include WorldSense, a new technology based on Tango which enables the headset to track your precise movements in space, without any extra sensors.
74. The next smartphone with Tango technology will be the ASUS ZenFone AR, available this summer.
75. We worked with the Google Maps team to create a new Visual Positioning Service (VPS) for developers, which helps devices quickly and accurately understand their location indoors.
76. We’re bringing AR to the classroom with Expeditions AR, launching with a Pioneer Program this fall.
77. We previewed Euphrates, the latest release of Daydream, which will let you capture what you’re seeing and cast your virtual world right onto the screen in your living room, coming later this year.
78. A new tool for VR developers, Instant Preview, lets developers make changes on a computer and see them reflected on a headset in seconds, not minutes.
79. Seurat is a new technology that makes it possible to render high-fidelity scenes on mobile VR headsets in real time. Somebody warn Cameron Frye.
80. We’re releasing an experimental build of Chromium with an augmented reality API, to help bring AR to the web.

101-IO-headers_6.jpg

81. Soon you’ll be able to watch and control 360-degree YouTube videos and live streams on your TV, and use your game controller or remote to pan around an immersive experience.
82. Super Chat lets fans interact directly with YouTube creators during live streams by purchasing highlighted chat messages that stay pinned to the top of the chat window. We previewed a developer integration that showed how the Super Chat API can be used to trigger actions in the real world—such as turning the lights on and off in a creator's apartment.
83. A new feature in the YouTube VR app will soon let people watch and discuss videos together.

101-IO-headers_7.jpg

84. We announced that we will make Fabric’s Crashlytics the primary crash reporting product in Firebase.
85.  We’re bringing phone number authentication to Firebase, working closely with the Fabric Digits team, so your users can sign in to your apps with their phone numbers.
86. New Firebase Performance Monitoring will help diagnose issues resulting from poorly performing code or challenging network conditions.
87. We’ve improved Firebase Cloud Messaging.
88. For game developers, we’ve built Game Loop support & FPS monitoring into Test Lab for Android, allowing you to evaluate your game’s frame rate before you deploy.
89. We’ve taken some big steps to open source many of our Firebase SDKs on GitHub.
90. We’re expanding Firebase Hosting to integrate with Cloud Functions, letting you can do things like send a notification when a user signs up or automatically create thumbnails when an image is uploaded to Cloud Storage.
91. Developers interested in testing the cutting edge of our products can now sign up for a Firebase Alpha program.
92. We’re adding two new certifications for web developers, in addition to the Associate Android Developer Certification announced last year.
93. We opened an Early Access Program for Chatbase, a new analytics tool in API.ai that helps developers monitor the activity in their chatbots.
94. We’ve completely redesigned AdMob, which helps developers promote, measure and monetize mobile apps, with a new user flow and publisher controls.
95. AdMob is also now integrated with Google Analytics for Firebase, giving developers a complete picture of ads revenue, mediation revenue and in-app purchase revenue in one place.
96. With a new Google Payment API, developers can enable easy in-app or online payments for customers who already have credit and debit cards stored on Google properties.
97. We’re introducing new ways for merchants to engage and reward customers, including the new Card Linked Offers API.
98. We’re introducing a new options for ads placement through Universal App Campaigns to help users discover your apps in the Google Play Store.
99. An update to Smart Bidding strategies in Universal App Campaigns helps you gain high-value users of your apps—like players who level-up in your game or the loyal travelers who book several flights a month.
100. A new program, App Attribution Partners, integrates data into AdWords from seven third-party measurement providers so you can more easily find and take action on insights about how users engage with your app.
101. Firebase partnered up with Google Cloud to offer free storage for up to 10 gigabytes in BigQuery so you can quickly, easily and affordably run queries on it.

That’s all, folks! Thanks to everyone who joined us at I/O this year, whether in person, at an I/O Extended event or via the live stream. See you in 2018.

Make more money with subscriptions on Google Play

Posted by George Audi, Tom Grinsted and Larry Yang, Google Play

The subscription business model is one of the best ways to make more regular, reliable, and recurring revenue on Android and Google Play. In fact, both developers and users love subscription apps so much that we’ve seen a 10X growth in consumer spend over the past three years and double the number of active subscribers in the past year. Thousands of developers are offering subscriptions through Google Play and are already seeing success with our billing platform. That’s why we’ve been working hard to help you take advantage of this opportunity and give you greater insights into your business and Android users.

New features to help your subscriptions business thrive

You've got a high-performing product with fantastic features and compelling content, but your business can't succeed without acquiring new users. In addition to free trials, intro pricing, flexible billing periods, and more, we recently launched the ability to pay for subscriptions with Google Play balance. Although people have already been using gift cards to pay for Play content in over 20 countries, the use of gift cards to pay for subscriptions in regions where cash is a popular form of payment, such as Latin America, has resulted in as high as a 15% increase in subscription spend.

But it's not just about acquiring new customers, it's about retaining the ones you have. That's why we are introducing account hold, where we work with you to block access to your content or service if a user's form of payment fails. This directly links a payment failure to the user losing access to your content and/or premium features, which is enough to get them to go and choose a new form of payment. When Keepsafe–the developer of Keepsafe Photo Vault, a photo locker for private pictures and videos with over 50M downloads–integrated account hold, their renewal rate on Android increased by 25%. We have over a dozen developers in early access today, and we will be announcing public availability at the end of June.

We know data is vital to running your business, so we're excited to announce a new subscriptions dashboard in the Play Console, and a new report on Android app subscribers.

The dashboard brings together subscription data like new subscribers, cancellations, and total subscribers. It also displays daily and 30-day rolling revenue data, and highlights your top-performing products. This will give visibility into your subscription products and users and will help guide your business decisions.

Insights to help you grow your subscriptions business

In addition to products and features, understanding people's needs is core to building a successful subscription business. We talked to 2,000 Android app subscribers in the US and UK and asked them how and why they use the apps they do. The results shared in 'Subscription apps on Google Play: User insights to help developers win' report highlight some of the opportunities for you to grow your subscriptions user base, set pricing strategies and learn to keep your users engaged, including:

  • Use free trials to acquire users. 78% of users start with a free version of an app, and many cite a discount or end of a free trial as a reason to pay.
  • Keep your content appealing and updated to get and keep users paying. It's the most important driver in converting users from free to paid users, as well as keeping users engaged and retained.
  • There is a huge opportunity to make money from subscriptions. While pricing elasticity varies by category, few users cite price as a reason to churn from a paid subscription and 64% either budget on a per app basis or not at all (as opposed to budgeting across all app subscriptions).
To find out more about your growing your subscription business with Google Play, watch our I/O session, download the research report (PDF), and get started with subscriptions with Google Play In-app Billing.

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Empowering developers to build the best experiences across platforms

It’s great to be in our backyard again for Google I/O to connect with developers around the world. The 7,200 attendees at Shoreline Amphitheatre, millions of viewers on the live stream, and thousand of developers at local I/O Extended events across 80+ countries heard about our efforts to make the lives of developers easier—allowing them to focus on the problems they’re trying to solve by minimizing the pain points of building a product.

Earlier this morning, our CEO Sundar Pichai talked about our various billion-user platforms. Whether it’s Android or Chrome or the mobile web, our success would not have been possible without the developer community. And during our Developer Keynote, we covered our heavy investments in tools and services for developers who build on our platforms every day.

Let's take a closer look at the major developer news at I/O so far: 

Platforms that connect developers to billions of users around the world

  • Android O Developer Preview 2—Get a look at the next release of Android O focused on fluid experiences that make Android even more useful, and our efforts to optimize battery life, startup time, graphic rendering time, and stability. Early adopters can opt in to the Android O Beta Program at android.com/beta and run Android O now.

  • Project Treble—Last week, we also introduced a new Android framework designed to help reduce the time and effort it takes device makers to upgrade a phone to a new version of Android, starting with Android O.

  • Android Go—We’re optimizing Android to run smoothly on entry-level devices, starting with the O release. We’re also designing Google apps to use less memory, storage space, and mobile data, including apps such as YouTube Go, Chrome, and Gboard.

  • Kotlin—Android is officially supporting the Kotlin programming language, in addition to the Java language and C++. Kotlin is a brilliantly designed, mature, production-ready language that we believe will make Android development faster and more fun.

  • Android Studio 3.0 Canary—Our new preview includes three major features to accelerate development flow: a new suite of app performance profiling tools to quickly diagnose performance issues, support for the Kotlin programming language, and increased Gradle build speeds for large sized app projects.

  • Mobile web—AMP and Progressive Web Apps (PWAs) are re-defining modern mobile web development. AMP gets content in front of users fast and PWAs deliver app-focused experiences that are reliable, fast and engaging. We're seeing success stories from all around the world—travel company Wego has rolled out a successful AMP based PWA and Forbes has seen user engagement double since launching a PWA. If you're wondering how good your current web experience is, you can use Lighthouse—an automated tool for measuring webpage quality. Be sure to tune in this afternoon for the Mobile Web: State of the Union talk to hear more about building rich mobile web experiences.

Infrastructure and services to take mobile apps and the web to the next level

  • Firebase—At last year’s I/O, we expanded Firebase to a full mobile development platform with products to help you build your app and grow your business. Over a million developers now use Firebase, and we’re doubling down on our efforts to simplify more every-day developer challenges. We’re giving more insights to understand app performance through Firebase Performance Monitoring, introducing integration between Hosting and Cloud Functions, adding support for Phone Number Authentication, and continuing to improve Analytics in a number of ways. We've also started open sourcing our SDKs.

  • Mobile web developer certifications—At least year’s I/O we launched the Associate Android Developer Certification. This year, we’re adding two new certifications for web developers: the Mobile Sites Certification and the Mobile Web Specialist Certification

Powerful tools to acquire and engage new users; grow successful businesses

  • Google Play Console—We announced several powerful, new features and reports in the Play Console to help developers improve their app’s performance, manage releases with confidence, reach a global audience, and grow their business. The Play Console also has a new name, to reflect its broadened business uses, and a fresh look to make it easier to get things done.

  • Android Instant Apps—We opened Android Instant Apps, a new way to run Android apps without requiring installation, to all developers. Now anyone can build and publish an instant app. There are also more than 50 new experiences available for users to try out from a variety of brands, such as Jet, New York Times, Vimeo and Zillow.

  • Payments, Monetization & Ads—We introduced a Google Payment API that enables developers to give their customers the ability to pay in apps and online with credit or debit cards saved to their Google Account. New AdMob integration with Google Analytics for Firebase helps them monetize efficiently and updates to Universal Apps Campaigns will help them grow their user base.

New interfaces to push the limits of what’s possible

  • Actions on Google for the Google Assistant—We brought Actions on Google to phones, introduced new features and functionality, improved our SDK and more. We also launched the Actions Console, a new developer console that helps developers work as a team, and collect data on app usage, performance and user discovery patterns. This new console is integrated with the Firebase and Google Cloud consoles.

  • VR and AR at Google—We’ll have more to share on the latest Daydream platform features and developer tools during our “VR and AR at Google” session tomorrow (May 18) at 9:30 AM PT in the Amphitheatre and on the livestream.

 It's important to us that developers are successful. In addition to building products that help solve developer challenges, we’re on the ground in over 130 countries, growing and expanding the developer community through programs such as Women Techmakers & Google Developer Groups (GDGs). We’re also investing in training programs like Google Developers Certification and courses through Udacity and other partners to help developers deepen their technical capability. We’re also excited to announce two large multi-product developer events, Google Developer Days, which are planned for Europe (September 2017 in Krakow, Poland) and India (December 2017 in Bangalore, India). If you are interested to find out more, sign up for updates on g.co/gdd2017.

During Google  I/O, attendees and viewers have an opportunity to dive deep into a number of these areas with 14 content tracks and 140+ breakout sessions—covering Android to Assistant to VR—and all live streamed. We’ve also launched over 70 codelabs to get developers up and running with our latest APIs today.

Whether it’s Android, Chrome, Play, VR/AR, the Cloud, or the mobile web, we’re constantly investing in the platforms that connect developers to billions of users around the world. Thank you to the continued support and feedback from the developer community.

Empowering developers to build the best experiences across platforms

It’s great to be in our backyard again for Google I/O to connect with developers around the world. The 7,200 attendees at Shoreline Amphitheatre, millions of viewers on the live stream, and thousand of developers at local I/O Extended events across 80+ countries heard about our efforts to make the lives of developers easier—allowing them to focus on the problems they’re trying to solve by minimizing the pain points of building a product.

Earlier this morning, our CEO Sundar Pichai talked about our various billion-user platforms. Whether it’s Android or Chrome or the mobile web, our success would not have been possible without the developer community. And during our Developer Keynote, we covered our heavy investments in tools and services for developers who build on our platforms every day.

Let's take a closer look at the major developer news at I/O so far: 

Platforms that connect developers to billions of users around the world

  • Android O Developer Preview 2—Get a look at the next release of Android O focused on fluid experiences that make Android even more useful, and our efforts to optimize battery life, startup time, graphic rendering time, and stability. Early adopters can opt in to the Android O Beta Program at android.com/beta and run Android O now.

  • Project Treble—Last week, we also introduced a new Android framework designed to help reduce the time and effort it takes device makers to upgrade a phone to a new version of Android, starting with Android O.

  • Android Go—We’re optimizing Android to run smoothly on entry-level devices, starting with the O release. We’re also designing Google apps to use less memory, storage space, and mobile data, including apps such as YouTube Go, Chrome, and Gboard.

  • Kotlin—Android is officially supporting the Kotlin programming language, in addition to the Java language and C++. Kotlin is a brilliantly designed, mature, production-ready language that we believe will make Android development faster and more fun.

  • Android Studio 3.0 Canary—Our new preview includes three major features to accelerate development flow: a new suite of app performance profiling tools to quickly diagnose performance issues, support for the Kotlin programming language, and increased Gradle build speeds for large sized app projects.

  • Mobile web—AMP and Progressive Web Apps (PWAs) are re-defining modern mobile web development. AMP gets content in front of users fast and PWAs deliver app-focused experiences that are reliable, fast and engaging. We're seeing success stories from all around the world—travel company Wego has rolled out a successful AMP based PWA and Forbes has seen user engagement double since launching a PWA. If you're wondering how good your current web experience is, you can use Lighthouse—an automated tool for measuring webpage quality. Be sure to tune in this afternoon for the Mobile Web: State of the Union talk to hear more about building rich mobile web experiences.

Infrastructure and services to take mobile apps and the web to the next level

  • Firebase—At last year’s I/O, we expanded Firebase to a full mobile development platform with products to help you build your app and grow your business. Over a million developers now use Firebase, and we’re doubling down on our efforts to simplify more every-day developer challenges. We’re giving more insights to understand app performance through Firebase Performance Monitoring, introducing integration between Hosting and Cloud Functions, adding support for Phone Number Authentication, and continuing to improve Analytics in a number of ways. We've also started open sourcing our SDKs.

  • Mobile web developer certifications—At least year’s I/O we launched the Associate Android Developer Certification. This year, we’re adding two new certifications for web developers: the Mobile Sites Certification and the Mobile Web Specialist Certification

Powerful tools to acquire and engage new users; grow successful businesses

  • Google Play Console—We announced several powerful, new features and reports in the Play Console to help developers improve their app’s performance, manage releases with confidence, reach a global audience, and grow their business. The Play Console also has a new name, to reflect its broadened business uses, and a fresh look to make it easier to get things done.

  • Android Instant Apps—We opened Android Instant Apps, a new way to run Android apps without requiring installation, to all developers. Now anyone can build and publish an instant app. There are also more than 50 new experiences available for users to try out from a variety of brands, such as Jet, New York Times, Vimeo and Zillow.

  • Payments, Monetization & Ads—We introduced a Google Payment API that enables developers to give their customers the ability to pay in apps and online with credit or debit cards saved to their Google Account. New AdMob integration with Google Analytics for Firebase helps them monetize efficiently and updates to Universal Apps Campaigns will help them grow their user base.

New interfaces to push the limits of what’s possible

  • Actions on Google for the Google Assistant—We brought Actions on Google to phones, introduced new features and functionality, improved our SDK and more. We also launched the Actions Console, a new developer console that helps developers work as a team, and collect data on app usage, performance and user discovery patterns. This new console is integrated with the Firebase and Google Cloud consoles.

  • VR and AR at Google—We’ll have more to share on the latest Daydream platform features and developer tools during our “VR and AR at Google” session tomorrow (May 18) at 9:30 AM PT in the Amphitheatre and on the livestream.

 It's important to us that developers are successful. In addition to building products that help solve developer challenges, we’re on the ground in over 130 countries, growing and expanding the developer community through programs such as Women Techmakers & Google Developer Groups (GDGs). We’re also investing in training programs like Google Developers Certification and courses through Udacity and other partners to help developers deepen their technical capability. We’re also excited to announce two large multi-product developer events, Google Developer Days, which are planned for Europe (September 2017 in Krakow, Poland) and India (December 2017 in Bangalore, India). If you are interested to find out more, sign up for updates on g.co/gdd2017.

During Google  I/O, attendees and viewers have an opportunity to dive deep into a number of these areas with 14 content tracks and 140+ breakout sessions—covering Android to Assistant to VR—and all live streamed. We’ve also launched over 70 codelabs to get developers up and running with our latest APIs today.

Whether it’s Android, Chrome, Play, VR/AR, the Cloud, or the mobile web, we’re constantly investing in the platforms that connect developers to billions of users around the world. Thank you to the continued support and feedback from the developer community.

Google Maps and Particle partner to bring location-aware capabilities to IoT devices



Particle and Google Maps make it easy for IoT devices to identify their location without the use of a GPS. With a single line of code, a device or sensor dispersed across a network (an IoT edge device) can access Google’s geospatial database of Wi-Fi and cellular networks using the Google Maps Geolocation API.

This means you no longer need to invest in expensive and power hungry GPS modules to know the location of their IoT devices and sensors. Alternatively, you can also use Google Maps APIs in conjunction with existing GPS systems to increase accuracy and provide location data even when GPS fails, as it often does indoors.

Particle and Google now provide the whole chain—location aware devices that send context rich data to Google Cloud Platform. When IoT sensors know their location, the information they collect and send back becomes more contextualized, allowing you to make more informed, high-order decisions. By feeding context-rich data back into Google Cloud Platform, you have access to robust set of cloud products and services.

Although asset tracking is traditionally built on a foundation that includes GPS, satellite based GPS often fails in dense urban environments and indoors. In these scenarios, GPS signals are blocked by tall buildings or roofs. The Geolocation API is based on cell tower and Wi-Fi signals that continue to operate where GPS fails. This capability allows you to track your assets anywhere, both indoor and out.

In an IoT driven world, you can track more than just location. Additional signals can be critical to your objectives. For example, in the cold supply chain, temperature as well as location are key pieces of data to track in the factory, on the loading dock and in transit. This enables a holistic view of the supply chain and its ability to deliver a high quality product.
With a Wi-Fi enabled product built on the Particle platform, you can use the Google Maps Geolocation API to offer location aware auto configuration. This creates a seamless setup experience, enhanced operation and valuable analytics. Using geolocation your Particle devices can auto configure timezone, tune to available broadcast bands and connect to regional service providers.

For example, location aware window blinds can reference the number of available hours of sunlight and then make informed decision on how to passively heat a room. A smart coffee machine can report back its location allowing your marketing teams to better understand its market penetration and target demographic.

Visit the documentation for full directions to enable geolocation on your Particle devices. There are four basic steps to complete:

  1. Get a Google Maps API key enabled for Geolocation.
  2. Flash the Google Maps Firmware on your Particle Devices.
  3. Enable the Google Maps Integration in the Particle Console.
  4. Test it Out!

Google and Particle will be demoing the integration at IoT World beginning May 16. Stop by booth #310 near the main hall entrance to see the demo in person or for more information, review our developer documentation and get started today.

author image
About Ken: Ken is a Lead on the Industry Solutions team. He works with customers to bring innovative solutions to market.

Updating developer identity guidelines and registration processes to protect users




Last week, we took immediate action to protect users from a phishing attack that attempted to abuse the OAuth authorization infrastructure.

Today, we’re supplementing those efforts to help prevent these types of issues in the future. These changes may add some friction and require more time before you are able to publish your web application, so we recommend that you plan your work accordingly.

Updating app identity guidelines 

As our Google API user data policy states, apps must not mislead users. For example, app names should be unique to your application and should not copy others'.

To further enforce this policy, we are updating our app publishing process, our risk assessment systems, and our user-facing consent page in order to better detect spoofed or misleading application identities. You may see an error message as you’re registering new applications or modifying existing application attributes in the Google API Console, Firebase Console, or Apps Script editor as a result of this change.

New review processes and restrictions on web apps requesting user data 

We have also enhanced our risk assessment for new web applications that request user data.

Based on this risk assessment, some web applications will require a manual review. Until the review is complete, users will not be able to approve the data permissions, and we will display an error message instead of the permissions consent page. You can request a review during the testing phase in order to open the app to the public. We will try to process those reviews in 3-7 business days. In the future, we will enable review requests during the registration phase as well.

You can continue to use your app for testing purposes before it is approved by logging in with an account registered as an owner/editor of that project in the Google API Console. This will enable you to add additional testers, as well as initiate the review process.

We also recommend developers review our earlier post outlining their responsibilities when requesting access to user data from their applications. Our teams will continue our constant efforts to support a powerful, useful developer ecosystem that keeps users and their data safe.

User experience tips to help you design your app to engage users and drive conversions

By Jenny Gove, Senior Staff UX Researcher, Google Play

We know you work hard to acquire users and grow your customer base, which can be challenging in a crowded market. That's why we've heard from many of you that you find tools like store listing experiments and universal app campaigns are valuable. It's equally important to keep customers engaged from the beginning. Great design and delightful user experiences are fundamental to doing just that.

We partnered with AnswerLab to conduct comprehensive user experience research across a variety of verticals; including e-commerce, insurance, travel, food ordering, ticket sales and services, and financial management. The resulting insights may help you increase engagement and conversion by providing guidance on useful and usable functionality.

The best app experiences seamlessly guide users through their tasks with efficient navigation, search, forms, registration and purchasing. They provide great e-commerce facilities and integrate effective ordering and payment systems. Ultimately, an engaging app begins with attention to usability in all of these areas. Learn tips on:

  • Navigation & Exploration
  • In-App Search
  • Commerce & Conversions
  • Registration
  • Form Entry
  • Usability and Comprehension

You can read the full article, design your app to drive conversions, on the Android Developers website, complete with links to developer resources. Also get the Playbook for Developers app to stay up-to-date with features and best practices that will help you grow a successful business on Google Play.

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Create quizzes in Google Forms with Apps Script



Last year, we launched Quizzes in Google Forms to help teachers and students take assessment to scale. Using Quizzes, teachers are able to automate testing and give feedback to students faster by having Forms check responses against correct answers automatically. Today, we are making that functionality available to developers by extending the Google Apps Script Forms Service. With this feature, you can create and customize quizzes programmatically with Apps Script.

More specifically:
  • Create quizzes 
  • Assign point values and correct answers for questions 
  • Implement custom grading schemes 
Let’s take a look at an example use case and relevant code snippet.

Creating an auto-graded question 

Multiple choice, checkbox and dropdown questions can be auto-graded, which means students can see their grades immediately upon submission. This is done by designating which options are the correct answer. Teachers can also set automatic feedback to show correct or incorrect responses, as well as assign point values to the question.

Here is the Apps Script code that lets you create the quiz above:
function createGradedCheckboxQuestionWithAutofeedback() {
// Make sure the form is a quiz.
var form = FormApp.getActiveForm();
form.setIsQuiz(true);

// Make a 10 point question and set feedback on it
var item = FormApp.getActiveForm().addCheckboxItem();
item.setTitle("What flavors are in neapolitan ice cream?");
item.setPoints(10);
// chocolate, vanilla, and strawberry are the correct answers
item.setChoices([
item.createChoice("chocolate", true),
item.createChoice("vanilla", true),
item.createChoice("rum raisin", false),
item.createChoice("strawberry", true),
item.createChoice("mint", false)
]);
// If the respondent answers correctly, they'll see this feedback when they view
//scores.
var correctFeedback = FormApp.createFeedback()
.setText("You're an ice cream expert!")
.build();
item.setFeedbackForCorrect(correctFeedback);

// If they respond incorrectly, they'll see this feedback with helpful links to
//read more about ice cream.
var incorrectFeedback = FormApp.createFeedback()
.setText("Sorry, wrong answer")
.addLink(
"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neapolitan_ice_cream",
"Read more")
.build();
item.setFeedbackForIncorrect(incorrectFeedback);
}
For more details on what you can build with the Apps Script Forms Service, review the documentation, ask questions on Stack Overflow or in the G+ community, and let us know what else you’d like to see using the new public issue tracker for Apps Script.