Tag Archives: Arts & Culture

Google Arts & Culture shines a light on 5,000 years of English heritage

Some of the oldest prehistoric settlers roamed the land we call England today. In fact, England can trace its roots all the way back to the fifth century. That’s a lot of history, knowledge and culture to cover—enough to fill several libraries. But what about things that can’t be housed in libraries—archaeological artifacts, castles, forts and monuments like the Dover Castle from the 11th Century (the largest castle in England) or Hailes Abbey (where Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall is buried)? We’re partnering with English Heritage to create a new Google Arts & Culture exhibit that celebrates these sites and the incredible stories behind them. The collection captures the breadth of England's historical, architectural, and cultural heritage.


Through more than 30 multimedia exhibits and 10 editorial features on Google Arts & Culture, you can experience online almost 3,000 historic gems from the Prehistoric, Roman, Medieval, Tudor, Civil War and Stuart periods through the 21st century and from the perspective of the historians, experts and curators who manage the collections and heritage sites across England. You can explore by time period or, with the help of machine learning tools that recognize color patterns, you can sort through items by color (click on the paint palette icon to do this).


Here are a few examples of things you’ll find in the online exhibit:

At a launch event for the collection in Westminster Parliament in London, John Glen, Minister for Arts, Heritage and Tourism, emphasized the importance of cultural heritage and how technology can be used as a means of experiencing culture: “Our #CultureIsDigital project aims to harness the creative potential of technology to increase awareness and engagement in our world-class cultural organizations. The collaboration between Google and English Heritage is a perfect example of how the heritage and tech sectors can work together to present our history and culture in new and exciting ways. It showcases the richness and variety of our cultural heritage to the world and demonstrates how we can enhance the experience and share new stories using digital technologies.”  


Matt Thompson, Head of Collections at English Heritage, talked about the importance of technology in helping English Heritage share collections and stories: “English Heritage is looking for new ways to open our sites to the public and share their stories. With Google Arts & Culture, we’ve been able to bring people closer to our historic masterpieces, open up our storehouses to a global audience, and showcase unseen artifacts.”


The English Heritage collections can be viewed online with Google Arts & Culture and on our iOS and Android apps.

Bavarian State Library and Google celebrate 10 years of partnership

Ten years ago the venerable Bavarian State Library from Munich (BSB) and the comparatively young Google started their joint adventure: the digitization of hundreds of thousands of historical writings from the archives of the BSB and its Bavarian regional libraries. To celebrate the 10th anniversary of our collaboration, we’ve published a digital exhibition on Google Arts & Culture.

The BSB looks back on almost 500 years of history. In 1558 it was founded by Duke Albrecht V. With more than 10 million volumes, 61,000 current journals and 130,000 manuscripts, the library is one of the most important knowledge centers in the world.

To preserve that heritage, BSB has been working with Google since 2007 to digitize over 1.9 million copyright-free titles—such as books, maps and magazines—from the 17th to the end of the 19th century. Thanks to this partnership, BSB is now the largest digital database of all German libraries. The project has long been expanded and now covers the holdings of the ten regional state libraries such as Regensburg, Passau or Augsburg.

Not only for us at Google this clearly is a milestone in digitization and the prototype of a public-private partnership. Klaus Ceynowa, Managing Director of BSB, adds: “Content in context is our mantra. Google has played a major role in helping us achieve it!”

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Tausend und eine Nacht : arabische Erzählungen, One Thousand and One Nights: Arabic stories" (1872), Weil, Gustav
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“Atlas Minor: Ein kurtze jedoch gründtliche Beschreibung der gantzen Welt und aller ihrer Theyl” (1631), Gerard Mercator
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“The lion” - Illustration from “The small menagerie - drawings of the most extraordinary wild animals” (1854)
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“The Zeitgeist and the people, a mirror of the sins of the world: An Octoberfest-Sermon” (1835)

Bavarian State Library and Google celebrate 10 years of partnership

Ten years ago the venerable Bavarian State Library from Munich (BSB) and the comparatively young Google started their joint adventure: the digitization of hundreds of thousands of historical writings from the archives of the BSB and its Bavarian regional libraries. To celebrate the 10th anniversary of our collaboration, we’ve published a digital exhibition on Google Arts & Culture.

The BSB looks back on almost 500 years of history. In 1558 it was founded by Duke Albrecht V. With more than 10 million volumes, 61,000 current journals and 130,000 manuscripts, the library is one of the most important knowledge centers in the world.

To preserve that heritage, BSB has been working with Google since 2007 to digitize over 1.9 million copyright-free titles—such as books, maps and magazines—from the 17th to the end of the 19th century. Thanks to this partnership, BSB is now the largest digital database of all German libraries. The project has long been expanded and now covers the holdings of the ten regional state libraries such as Regensburg, Passau or Augsburg.

Not only for us at Google this clearly is a milestone in digitization and the prototype of a public-private partnership. Klaus Ceynowa, Managing Director of BSB, adds: “Content in context is our mantra. Google has played a major role in helping us achieve it!”

BSB 5
Tausend und eine Nacht : arabische Erzählungen, One Thousand and One Nights: Arabic stories" (1872), Weil, Gustav
BSB 4
“Atlas Minor: Ein kurtze jedoch gründtliche Beschreibung der gantzen Welt und aller ihrer Theyl” (1631), Gerard Mercator
BSB 6
“The lion” - Illustration from “The small menagerie - drawings of the most extraordinary wild animals” (1854)
BSB 1
“The Zeitgeist and the people, a mirror of the sins of the world: An Octoberfest-Sermon” (1835)

Bavarian State Library and Google celebrate 10 years of partnership

Ten years ago the venerable Bavarian State Library from Munich (BSB) and the comparatively young Google started their joint adventure: the digitization of hundreds of thousands of historical writings from the archives of the BSB and its Bavarian regional libraries. To celebrate the 10th anniversary of our collaboration, we’ve published a digital exhibition on Google Arts & Culture.

The BSB looks back on almost 500 years of history. In 1558 it was founded by Duke Albrecht V. With more than 10 million volumes, 61,000 current journals and 130,000 manuscripts, the library is one of the most important knowledge centers in the world.

To preserve that heritage, BSB has been working with Google since 2007 to digitize over 1.9 million copyright-free titles—such as books, maps and magazines—from the 17th to the end of the 19th century. Thanks to this partnership, BSB is now the largest digital database of all German libraries. The project has long been expanded and now covers the holdings of the ten regional state libraries such as Regensburg, Passau or Augsburg.

Not only for us at Google this clearly is a milestone in digitization and the prototype of a public-private partnership. Klaus Ceynowa, Managing Director of BSB, adds: “Content in context is our mantra. Google has played a major role in helping us achieve it!”

BSB 5
Tausend und eine Nacht : arabische Erzählungen, One Thousand and One Nights: Arabic stories" (1872), Weil, Gustav
BSB 4
“Atlas Minor: Ein kurtze jedoch gründtliche Beschreibung der gantzen Welt und aller ihrer Theyl” (1631), Gerard Mercator
BSB 6
“The lion” - Illustration from “The small menagerie - drawings of the most extraordinary wild animals” (1854)
BSB 1
“The Zeitgeist and the people, a mirror of the sins of the world: An Octoberfest-Sermon” (1835)

Exploring Contemporary Art with Google Arts & Culture

Working with more than 180 partners all over the world, Google Arts & Culture is shining a light on contemporary art, with a new collection of online stories and rich digital content at g.co/ContemporaryArt.

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Through an immersive digital journey, we bring you straight to the institutions housing the world’s seminal contemporary art collections with the help of high quality visuals, gigapixel resolution images—which allow you to zoom into the tiny details of a piece of art, and panoramic Museum View imagery. You can hear amazing stories about art from curators, artists, and experts from institutions all over the world.

With a repository of online exhibits and editorial features, we answer common questions about the contemporary art world, introduce you to the world’s leading contemporary artists and icons, and perhaps most importantly, the issues that are shaping art today.

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Here are some of our favorites:

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Explore more stories and immersive digital content on contemporary art from over 180 partners around the world with the Google Arts and Culture app on Android and iOS.

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Something’s coming … “West Side Story” on Google Arts & Culture

“In the olden days, everybody sang.”


Those are the words of Leonard Bernstein, composer behind the iconic musical “West Side Story,” where everyone danced and snapped through the streets, too. Whether you’re a Jet all the way or you side with the Sharks, Tony and Maria’s love story is as poignant today as it was 60 years ago, when the Broadway musical first debuted.


In partnership with Carnegie Hall, the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, the Museum of the City of New York and the National Museum of American Jewish History, Google Arts & Culture is launching a new collection honoring “West Side Story.” Bringing together artifacts and mementos from the making of the musical and movie, behind-the-scenes photographs, and a peek into the modern-day representation of the musical, this collection explores the history, artistic value and social relevance of “West Side Story.” Check it out at g.co/westsidestory and on the Google Arts & Culture app (available on Android and iOS).

Ti Amo Italy: a historic theater takes center stage in a new music video

“Ti Amo.” I love you. The new song from French synth-pop stars Phoenix. The title song from their recently released album “Ti Amo” is a love letter to Italy: from festivals in Sanremo, to singer Franco Battiato, to melted gelato.

In the video for the song, created by La Blogothèque and directed by Colin Solal Cardo in collaboration with Google Arts & Culture, Phoenix’s Thomas Mars abandons his guided tour of the Teatro Bibiena to sneak off and perform with his bandmates Christian Mazzalai, Laurent Brancowitz and Deck D’Arcy, around the stage, in the corridors and boxes of the theater—all shot live on 35mm film in one continuous shot.

But the real star of the video is the Teatro Bibiena itself. It’s a stunningly beautiful Baroque theater in the Italian town of Mantua. Measuring just 425 square meters, it seats about 300 people—less than a tenth of New York’s famous Carnegie Hall. Its surprisingly small, bell-shaped space is decorated with a wooden geometric ceiling, dozens of arched boxes and monochrome frescoes. Originally intended as an academic lecture hall when it was built, in the 1760s, guests soon realized that the space had amazing acoustics, and it was then used to house music and theater performances. A 14-year-old Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart even played there!

Phoenix hero

Take a look around the theatre yourself with Street View or browse through the history of this cultural gem on Google Arts & Culture.

Phoenix
Deck D’Arcy, Christian Mazzalai, Thomas Mars and Laurent Brancowitz of Phoenix

Ti Amo Italy: a historic theater takes center stage in a new music video

“Ti Amo.” I love you. The new song from French synth-pop stars Phoenix. The title song from their recently released album “Ti Amo” is a love letter to Italy: from festivals in Sanremo, to singer Franco Battiato, to melted gelato.

In the video for the song, created by La Blogothèque and directed by Colin Solal Cardo in collaboration with Google Arts & Culture, Phoenix’s Thomas Mars abandons his guided tour of the Teatro Bibiena to sneak off and perform with his bandmates Christian Mazzalai, Laurent Brancowitz and Deck D’Arcy, around the stage, in the corridors and boxes of the theater—all shot live on 35mm film in one continuous shot.

Phoenix - Ti Amo (Live in Teatro Bibiena, Mantova)

But the real star of the video is the Teatro Bibiena itself. It’s a stunningly beautiful Baroque theater in the Italian town of Mantua. Measuring just 425 square meters, it seats about 300 people—less than a tenth of New York’s famous Carnegie Hall. Its surprisingly small, bell-shaped space is decorated with a wooden geometric ceiling, dozens of arched boxes and monochrome frescoes. Originally intended as an academic lecture hall when it was built, in the 1760s, guests soon realized that the space had amazing acoustics, and it was then used to house music and theater performances. A 14-year-old Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart even played there!

Phoenix hero

Take a look around the theatre yourself with Street View or browse through the history of this cultural gem on Google Arts & Culture.

Phoenix
Deck D’Arcy, Christian Mazzalai, Thomas Mars and Laurent Brancowitz of Phoenix

Ti Amo Italy: a historic theater takes center stage in a new music video

“Ti Amo.” I love you. The new song from French synth-pop stars Phoenix. The title song from their recently released album “Ti Amo” is a love letter to Italy: from festivals in Sanremo, to singer Franco Battiato, to melted gelato.

In the video for the song, created by La Blogothèque and directed by Colin Solal Cardo in collaboration with Google Arts & Culture, Phoenix’s Thomas Mars abandons his guided tour of the Teatro Bibiena to sneak off and perform with his bandmates Christian Mazzalai, Laurent Brancowitz and Deck D’Arcy, around the stage, in the corridors and boxes of the theater—all shot live on 35mm film in one continuous shot.

Phoenix - Ti Amo (Live in Teatro Bibiena, Mantova)

But the real star of the video is the Teatro Bibiena itself. It’s a stunningly beautiful Baroque theater in the Italian town of Mantua. Measuring just 425 square meters, it seats about 300 people—less than a tenth of New York’s famous Carnegie Hall. Its surprisingly small, bell-shaped space is decorated with a wooden geometric ceiling, dozens of arched boxes and monochrome frescoes. Originally intended as an academic lecture hall when it was built, in the 1760s, guests soon realized that the space had amazing acoustics, and it was then used to house music and theater performances. A 14-year-old Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart even played there!

Phoenix hero

Take a look around the theatre yourself with Street View or browse through the history of this cultural gem on Google Arts & Culture.

Phoenix
Deck D’Arcy, Christian Mazzalai, Thomas Mars and Laurent Brancowitz of Phoenix

Preserving and celebrating Latino cultures in the U.S.

Last September, before I left my hometown in San Antonio, Texas for a job at Google in New York, I went to a special mass at Mission San José, one of five historic missions in San Antonio. As I walked up to the old wooden doors, I saw Latino families from the neighborhood gathering outside to greet each other. Inside the church, kids settled onto antique pews and the church choir opened their sheet music, accompanied by the familiar sound of a mariachi band.

Now more than ever it's important that we celebrate the culture, influence and experience of Latinos and their crucial role in the social fabric of the United States. Today, we are making that community’s rich history accessible to everyone with our newest Google Arts & Culture collection: Latino Cultures in the U.S.

Exploring how Latino cultures have left their mark on America and inspired the world.
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This is Winston Vargas's "Domino Players," shot in Washington Heights, New York. The photo is featured at the Smithsonian American Art Museum and is now a part of the Latino Cultures in the U.S. Arts & Culture collection.

The collection has more than than 2,500 new artworks and archives and 69 new exhibits that enable you to easily explore the lives of influential Latino figures, learn about Latinidad and U.S. Latino art and experience cultural traditions. 

It includes important Latinos in news and entertainment, the story of iconic New York institution Ballet Hispánico, Puerto Rican baseball players like Roberto Clemente Walker (who also served as a U.S. Marine) and the Dream 9, a group of undocumented young people who changed history. 

You can even visit some of the most vibrant neighborhoods in the U.S.—the homes to and centers of Latino culture—by way of historic photographs or unmissable locations on Google Street View, all from your phone. 

Through Google Arts & Culture you can dive into ultra-high resolution images of iconic Latino murals, such as Diego Rivera’s Detroit Industry from the Detroit Institute of Arts. This tribute to the city’s manufacturing base and labor force of the 1930s is considered the finest example of Mexican mural art in the United States, and the artist himself deemed it the most significant piece of art of his career.

In addition to the online collection, Google is working with educators to create and distribute a curriculum so that more students can learn about Latino history in the U.S. And through Google technologies like Expeditions, students can take virtual field trips and explore important moments in Latino history, discover influential Latino artists, or walk through vibrant Latino neighborhoods.

These stories, creators and everyday heroes are part of our nation’s legacy and we’ve been inspired working alongside our partners to make this content accessible to all on the Google Arts & Culture app (on iOS and Android) and at g.co/uslatinocultures

Bringing together stories from museums, universities and other cultural institutions across the United States, this collection reminds me of how I felt while sitting in Mission San José—in complete awe of the U.S. Latino community’s ability to come together to build something greater than ourselves. It is a characteristic that has and always will define us.