Tag Archives: Arts and Culture

“Great Sporting Land” tours Australia’s sports-mad history

Australians have a passion for sports—so much that it was perfectly normal for the Prime Minister to give the entire country the day off when they won a boat race back in 1983. Over generations, Australia’s favorite pastimes have shaped the country’s identity, values and culture. Along with the Melbourne Cricket Club, Australian Football League, National Portrait Gallery and the North Bondi Surf Lifesaving Club, Google Arts & Culture is showcasing the people, moments and places that led Australia to become the “Great Sporting Land” it is today. 

The exhibition features over 11,000 archived images and videos, and more than 100 original stories from more than 30 partners. To do so, Google’s Art Camera technology has been on a marathon between sporting institutions across the country to capture over 200 pieces of art, archival materials and artifacts in high resolution gigapixel quality.

Join cricket legend Steve Waugh who will take you on a tour of the archives of the world-famous Bradman Museumwhere you can zoom in to the hand-etched scores on the back of Don Bradman’s first bat. Or take a trip to a changing room at The Sydney Cricket Ground, where visiting players have drawn their standout batting and bowling figures on the changing room door. You can also follow Steve Waugh through a video seriesthat offers never-before-seen insight into his work and memories of the sport. 

Then put on your cossies or your togs (swimwear) to feel the vibes of a trip into Summers Past from the National Archives of Australia —an exhibition celebrating the golden days in the Australian sunshine. The surf’s up when you Watch the Waves, a selection of photographs by the National Archives, or explore the North Bondi Surf Life Saving Club in Google Street View.


For Australians, sports are a part of national identity, pride and belonging, whether played by everyday people or world known icons. To discover more moments from Australia’s sporting history by visiting g.co/GreatSportingLand, or download the Google Arts & Culture app on iOS or Android.

Explore art and color in our latest AR gallery

Abstract artist Wassily Kandinsky said, “Color is a power which directly influences the soul.” That’s hard to dispute when you consider the melancholy blues and greens of Picasso’s early Blue Period, or the vibrant yellows of a simple vase of Sunflowers by Van Gogh.

Color has also inspired the latest “Pocket Gallery” on Google Arts & Culture, which uses Augmented Reality to create a virtual space that you can explore using a smartphone. After the first Pocket Gallery brought together paintings by Vermeer last year, the latest collection features a variety of artists’ works, captured in high resolution and selected according to each piece’s color palette.

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The “Art of Color”Pocket gallery in the Google Arts & Culture app

In “The Art of Color,” you can explore four rooms of paintings that each represent a different color palette—you’ll also find a dark room that juxtaposes Rembrandt’s masterpiece The Night Watch with the Op art mastery of Bridget Riley. We selected the art using our Art Palette tool, which brings together a range of works through the lens of color.

The gallery also has a series of playful geometric shapes and vibrant colors that complement the paintings inside. The new Pocket Gallery features art from 33 partner institutions across four continents, and allows you to learn about works of many different eras and styles.

One of the goals of the Google Arts & Culture team is to find new or unexpected ways to bring people closer to art. From renowned masterpieces to hidden gems, “The Art of Color” brings together artworks like Georgia O’Keeffe’s Red Cannas and Amrita Sher-Gil’s Mother India or Hokusai’s South Wind, Clear Dawn.

To check it out, make sure you download the Google Arts & Culture app on your AR-enabled Android or iOS smartphone. You'll find the new gallery in the Camera Tab, and you can jump inside to explore each piece from there.

Google for Mexico: Improving Mexicans’ lives through technology

Mexico is a diverse country in search of opportunities to accelerate development in an inclusive and equitable way. In our first Google for Mexico event this week, we presented new ways to help Mexicans achieve better employment and entrepreneurship opportunities, contribute to society through technological solutions and promote the country’s culture. 

Technology as a source of growth and opportunity

The Internet is boosting local businesses in Mexico, and Google is helping through our search and advertising tools. In 2018, website publishers, nonprofit organizations and more than 40,000 companies generated 47 billion pesos in economic impact throughout the country thanks to digital tools. To learn more about our success stories, you can visit our Economic Impact Report.

Google is helping people acquire and update the necessary skills to apply for a job or to be more effective in the work they already do. With programs like Grow with Google, we’ve trained more than 11,000 people, helping thousands of users in the development of their digital skills throughout the country. We have also launched other digital training projects like Digital Garage, Primer and Women Will, among other initiatives. 

Additionally, we announced that the Google IT Support Professional Certificate, developed by Google and hosted on Coursera, will be translated into Spanish. Google.org is also giving a  $1.1 million USD grant to the International Youth Foundation to offer scholarships to 1,000 young Mexicans, to ensure that underrepresented communities have supported and free access to the course. 

Bringing technology to everyone 

In Mexico, there are currently 74 million people online, and 18 million more are expected to join in the next two years. That's equivalent to almost 20 newly connected people per minute.

In over a year that Google Station has been in operation in Mexico, we have seen millions of people go online and get connected to more information and better opportunities. Google Station’s fast, free and open Wi-Fi is in more than 100 locations throughout the country, with more sites going live in other public places very soon.  

Google's solutions for companies help Mexico promote itself as a great place to do business. That way, society can focus less on economics and more about improving living conditions and anticipating crises before they arrive. With the launch of Android Emergency Location Service (ELS), people will be able to contact emergency services when an emergency call is placed in a supported jurisdiction, even if the user has no mobile data plan or no mobile data credit left.

Strengthening small businesses online

The role of small and medium businesses in the Mexican economy is crucial for employment growth. Currently, less than 50 percent of small and medium sized businesses in the country have digital presences, but Google's solutions can help expand businesses’ opportunities, reduce their operating costs and support them as they reach their consolidation.

Google for Mexico

Dora Velázquez, Flores de Oaxaca owner, used Google My Business to grow her business.

Google My Business is an easy, fast and secure solution for small and medium businesses to start their online business. The Smart Campaigns program can also help small business owners reach new customers with an easy advertising solution which creates ads based on the business' objectives: calls, visits to their stores or visits to their websites. 

Helping Mexicans use the power of their voices 

When we launched the Google Assistant in Mexico two years ago, our goal was to help people get things done throughout the day at home, in the car and on the go—while having a unique understanding of the culture and context. Since then, more Mexicans are turning to the Assistant for help listening to music, playing games and getting answers to questions. The number of active users of the Assistant in Mexico has grown more than eight times since the beginning of 2018. Additionally, Spanish is the third most used Assistant language globally.

Over the coming months, the Assistant will get even more helpful. Mexican users will soon be able to book a ride in Spanish with providers like Cabify, Uber, and Bolt (formerly known as Taxify), order food delivery with Rappi and even transfer money to friends or family using BBVA—with help from their voice.

Google for Mexico

Assistant users in Mexico will soon be able to book a ride in Spanish with providers like Cabify, Uber and Bolt (formerly known as Taxify).

Building smarter cities 

Since 2014, Waze has been working with cities and municipalities around the world to help improve urban mobility. What started with 10 city partners has grown to more than one thousand globally, with 24 partners here in Mexico, including the Mexico City Mobility Department, the Secretariat of Communications and Transportation, Jalisco, Monterrey and many others.

Now, all Waze for Cities Data partners can now store data for free via Google Cloud, while accessing best-in-class tools including BigQuery and Data Studio. Cities will be able to easily monitor traffic and transportation events, look at historical trends, assess the before and after effects of interventions and more. 

Municipalities like Querétaro are already leveraging Waze data to make mobility improvements. They recently looked at traffic patterns during peak hours and determined when commercial trucks should enter the city and where they should park. They even re-zoned certain parts of the city. 

A rich heritage, preserved and shared with the world

Mexico’s traditions are colorful and moving, a true expression of the identity of its people. To showcase this cultural heritage, Google Arts & Culture has dedicated a special initiative to capture and share Mexico with the world.

Google for Mexico

This is the first time the Soumaya Museum is digitally presenting its research on the Grana Cochinilla.


Recently, we partnered with one of the most visited museums in the world: the Soumaya Museum. For the first time, it will be possible to visit the museum and view its collection from any device from anywhere in the world. The project showcases more than 700 items encompassing over 30 centuries of art, including one of the world’s largest Auguste Rodin’s collections outside of France. 

The Soumaya Museum has digitized 31 paintings in extremely high resolution using the Art Camera, allowing the user to see details that are not visible with the naked eye. The museum is virtually opening its doors with the use of Museum View technology, which allows anyone, anywhere to admire the architecture of Fernando Romero, at the heart of a new commercial district in Mexico City. 

Google for Mexico

Soumaya Museum, Carlos Slim Foundation, Gallery 6.

Access to information is essential for the growth of countries. At Google, we believe that technology is the fuel to empower Mexico, providing smart solutions for millions of people.

Stories of Yoga on Google Arts & Culture

Yoga has been around for a few millennia, but I’m completely new to the practice and have only practiced a few poses, like Ekpadasana (the “one leg posture”). Just like a yoga teacher would lead you through the steps of this posture, a new Google Arts & Culture collection called Stories of Yoga, takes you through the history, culture and science behind the practice. If you’re a new yogi like me, follow the sequence below to learn the “one leg posture,” and read on for some insights our partners have shared for the “Stories of Yoga” exhibit.

1. Come to a standing posture. Take in a deep breath.

Do you know what the word “yoga” means? It has a lot of nuanced interpretations. The ancient Indian text, called Rigveda, implied yoga means “achieving the unachieved,” “harnessing,” or “connection,” and the exhibition “What is Yoga?” explains other interpretations.

2. Finding your balance, bring up your right foot and place it in the center of the inner thigh of your left leg. Your toes should point downward.

One of the most widely-known gurus, Swami Sivananda, introduced five principles of yoga: proper exercise (āsana), the right breathing (prāṇāyāma), relaxation (śavāsana), proper diet, and positive thinking & meditation (vedānta).

3. Bring your palms together in front of your chest as if in prayer, and focus your gaze on a spot in the distance in front of you. Exhale.

Yoga is older than you might think, it actually dates back by a few millennia. The so-called Vedas and Upanishads started referring to yoga around 3000 BC. Two of the earliest teachers who recorded texts dedicated to yoga were Yajnavalkya and Patanjali. Visit the Museum of Classical Yoga and explore a brief timeline.

4. Hold the position and inhale and exhale deeply a few times.

Yoga strengthens your body as well as the mind. Learn about Shri Yogendra, who started off as a wrestler before rooting himself into yoga and founding the Yoga Institute. Or follow the journey of well known guru B.K.S Iyengar, who used yoga to heal his tuberculosis-affected body.

5. Release back into the standing posture slowly, and repeat for the other leg.

Did you know that women were actually barred from practicing the yoga discipline? Meet pioneer Shrimati Sita Devi Yogendra, who changed perceptions by becoming the first female guru. She introduced sequences specially tailored for women’s physiology.

6. As a variation, you can lift your arms up all the way while holding the prayer position. As another variation, you can do the entire sequence while lying flat on your back instead of standing.

There are so many different postures and their variations, and each school has a set of their own. Take a sneak-peek into some of the yoga centers in virtual walkthroughs and see the practice sessions up close.

It is not a big stretch to learn more about yoga thanks to Sivananda Yoga Vedanta Centres & Ashrams, The Yoga Institute, Ramamani Iyengar Memorial Yoga Institute, Vivekananda House and other institutions on Google Arts & Culture at g.co/storiesofyoga.

Art Zoom: Masterpieces up close through the eyes of famous musicians

What if you could see art through an artist’s eyes? On the occasion of the 130th anniversary of Van Gogh’s “Starry Night,” Google Arts & Culture is introducing Art Zoom, a new way to discover details of iconic works of art. Produced by musical experience creators La Blogothèque, the video series introduces you to visual masterpieces through the eyes of your favorite musicians.

Follow the blue and yellow undulating brush strokes of “Starry Night” with Maggie Rogers, who finds inspiration in the “psychedelic” scene as well as exposed pieces of canvas that Van Gogh chose not to paint. These gaps in the oil are easy to miss with the naked eye, but can be seen in surprising detail with Art Camera.

Listen and keep your eyes peeled as iconic music figures take you on a tour of some of the greatest masterpieces of the world in Art Zoom.

Maggie Rogers on "Starry Night" by Vincent van Gogh (MoMA The Museum of Modern Art)

British rockstar Jarvis Cocker is your guide through a hectic morning at Monet’s “La Gare Saint Lazare.” From the dark figures congregating on the platform to the subtle red glow of burning coal, the Pulp frontman explores his favorite features from Monet’s impressionist masterpiece.

Listen and keep your eyes peeled as iconic music figures take you on a tour of some of the greatest masterpieces of the world in Art Zoom.

Jarvis Cocker on "The Gare St-Lazare" by Claude Monet (The National Gallery - London)

“The Tower of Babel” by Pieter Bruegel the Great hangs in Vienna’s Kunsthistorisches Museum, its miniature residents difficult to discern. Zooming in with Art Camera, Canadian pop star Feist introduces you to the quirky inhabitants who inspire her work.

Listen and keep your eyes peeled as iconic music figures take you on a tour of some of the greatest masterpieces of the world in Art Zoom.

Feist on "The Tower of Babel" by Pieter Bruegel the Elder (Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien)

More than 10,000 artworks from 208 partners worldwide have been captured with Art Cameraand digitized in ultra-high resolution, from the fluffy fabric from which Vivienne Westwood tailored the Keith Haring “Witches” dress, to the almost photographic View of Delft by Vermeer. You can see these works in intricate detail simply by browsing on the Google Arts & Culture app. Explore Art Zoom online at g.co/ArtZoom, or download our free app for iOS or Android.

Visit Anne Frank’s childhood home on Google Arts & Culture

“I hope I can entrust you with everything that I haven't been able to share with anyone, and I hope you will be a great support to me." These are the first words Anne Frank wrote in the diary she received on her thirteenth birthday. Three weeks later, the Frank family went into hiding. Since then, the story of Anne has moved people across the globe who want to learn more about her life.

Google Arts & Culture has worked with the Anne Frank House to shed a light on Anne’s life at Merwedeplein 37-2 in Amsterdam, where her family lived before they went into hiding. In honor of what would have been her 90th birthday, you can explore an online exhibit and indoor Street View imagery of Anne’s childhood home. For the first time it will be possible to view all rooms of the flat to get a unique insight into Anne Frank's home that has been restored to its original 1930s style, including the bedroom that she shared with her sister Margot.

The accompanying online exhibit  features precious insights and documents such as the only video of Anne known to exist—taken by pure coincidence at a wedding—as well as the only picture of her an her parents and sister.

The former home of the Frank family has been leased to the Dutch Foundation for Literature since 2005 and serves as a temporary home and workplace for refugee writers who cannot work freely in their own country. “It is a place where freedom, tolerance and freedom of expression are given the space to breathe,” says Ronald Leopold, general director of the Anne Foundation. The house was decorated in the style of the 1930s when the Frank family lived there.

Learn more about Anne Frank and discover of the treasures, stories and knowledge of over 2000 cultural institutions from 80 countries on Google Arts & Culture or via our iOS or Android app.

Find the hidden stories behind art at the de Young with Google Lens

One of the privileges of working at the de Young museum in San Francisco is getting to regularly spend time in front of masterworks by artists like Ruth Asawa, Albert Bierstadt, and Mary Cassatt, and learn about the often fascinating stories surrounding their art. Spanning four centuries, the de Young museum’s American art collection includes paintings, sculpture, and decorative art from the 17th century to the present day. We have so many stories to tell.

As the museum’s director of digital strategy, it’s my job to find ways to make these stories more readily accessible for our visitors and to help people understand what the art says about the world, and the cultures, viewpoints, and moments in time that don’t always fit within the short labels in the galleries.

Our newest collaboration with Google Arts & Culture shows visitors the hidden stories behind the paintings in this collection. Now, using Google Lens, you can search what you see. Point your phone's camera at a work like Edmund Charles Tarbell’s The Blue Veil, and you’ll have a curator at the tap of your finger to tell you learn more about the artist’s origins, and his fascination with the veil.

Find out more with Google Lens

Learn more about art with Google Arts & Culture and Google Lens.

This is a way for artists to share their perspective, too. In a new exhibition, Detour, artist Ana Prvački takes you on a tour of the museum, guiding you to specific spots and asking you to rethink parts of the museum visitors many not normally consider, such as the material of the museum’s copper facade. Visitors can trigger Prvački’s short videos on mobile devices via Google Lens at sites throughout the free public spaces of the museum. When you watch the videos, it feels like you’re getting a personal tour from the artist herself.

If you can’t make it to San Francisco before the exhibition concludes in September, you can experience a version of Detour online on Google Arts & Culture.  

In a new exhibition, Detour, artist Ana Prvački takes you on a tour of the museum.

Kick off the Women’s World Cup with Google

Kick off the FIFA Women's World Cup with Google

Futebol, Fußball, football, soccer ... No matter where you’re from, it’s one of the most popular sports all over the world. Tomorrow, the FIFA Women's World Cup France 2019™ will kick off, and here’s how Google can help you keep up with the tournament and your favorite teams.

Be in the know with Search and the Assistant

If you’re busy during a match, Search can help you find the information you need including stats, news, and lineups. If you search for any match, you’ll see a timeline with photos, commentary and every important play as it happens. You can also subscribe to receive notifications and updates about your favorite team by looking it up on the Google Search app and tapping “Follow.”

You’ll also be able to track up to three real-time game scores right on your Android phone screen. Search for the match you’re looking for, then tap and drag to pin the match anywhere on your screen. Once the matches are over, click the pinned score to go back the game summary on Google Search and you will find a video with highlights and exciting plays immediately after every game.


As always, the Google Assistant is here to help with questions like, “Hey Google, when does France play next in the Women's World Cup?” or ”Ok Google, show me the Women's World Cup standings.” And if your country is competing, you’ll see custom Google Doodles by local artists from the participating countries. All Google Doodles will all be available as they are unveiled at google.com/doodles.

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Women’s World Cup Doodles from around the world.

See more on YouTube

FIFA, alongside a number of their FIFA World Cup broadcast partners, will upload comprehensive highlights to every game on their YouTube channels, as well as top FIFA World Cup moments and behind-the-scenes content. Broadcasters include the BBC in the UK, ARD and ZDF in Germany, J SPORTS in Japan, Fox Sports and Telemundo in the U.S. and beIN in the Middle East, North Africa and selected Asian territories.

Don’t miss a moment with Google News

Keep your eye on the ball as the action happens with a dedicated FIFA Women’s World Cup Google News interactive tracker for Android. Quickly find scores, upcoming matches and watch game highlights. From the group stage to the final showdown, explore the tournament through full coverage and analysis of your favorite teams and players.

Contribute to the history of women in soccer

It was not long ago when women were actually prohibited from playing in countries such as Brazil, England, France and Germany. To rediscover the history of women in soccer, Google Arts & Culture is working with the Football Museum in Brazil to create a living digital archive of the years when women were banned. Everyone is invited to contribute with photos, articles from local newspapers, audio and video files about women's soccer from their personal collections. Together we can fill the historical gaps and tell the history of women in soccer.

Grab your jersey and claim your spot on the couch—the games start tomorrow!

Meet the Brazilian “Painter of the People,” Candido Portinari

The history of Latin America is not just found in history books—it’s found in its people, its history and its art. The best way to reflect upon the Brazilian experience is through the voices of artists like Cândido Portinari. Today, in collaboration with six Brazilian museums including Projeto Portinari and Pinacoteca, Google Arts & Culture is launching a comprehensive collection about Cândido Portinari to honor the works of one of the most important Brazilian artists. It's the first time people will be able to enjoy his collection of over 5,000 pieces of art, thousands of letters and documents from his personal archive and curated stories about Portinari’s art, life and legacy.

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His unique paintings gave voice to those who didn’t have one: the peasants, who with their bare hands built the future of the Latin American nations. Through his work, Portinari always sought to connect people across social, cultural or geographical divides.

Ten ultra high resolution images—taken by our Art Camera—of some of his most iconic artworks,including Mestiço," exemplify his approach. “War” and “Peace,” which are in the lobby of the United Nations Headquarters, stand out due to their size and the mural technique that marked a milestone in the artist’s career. For these two, you can explore in-painting tours—an interactive experience that guides through a piece of art by zooming in and out of its details, with insightful commentary. In addition to paintings, the collection contains more than 15,000 images of historical letters, newspapers and magazines related to Portinari’s work.

As part of the online collection, everyone can experience Portinari’s creative process. You can roam around a virtual Street view tour of his house in Brodówski, São Paulo and discover icons like the small chapelhe created for his grandmother. If you use a Google Cardboard you can even experience this tour in a 360 degree view.

“Portinari: Painter of the People” is the second largest collection dedicated to a Latin American artist on Google Arts & Culture (after “Faces of Frida”). Together with our partners we celebrate the talent and recognize the legacy of artists who, through their work, have managed to write the history of Latin America, for the whole world to see.

How artists use AI and AR: collaborations with Google Arts & Culture

For centuries, creative people have turned tools into art, or come up with inventions to change how we think about the world around us. Today you can explore the intersection of art and technology through two new experiments, created by artists in collaboration with the Google Arts & Culture Lab, only recently announced at Google I/O 2019.


Created by artists Molmol Kuo & Zach Lieberman, Weird Cuts lets you make collages using augmented reality. You can select one of the cutouts shown in the camera screen to take a photo in a particular shape. The resulting cut-out can then be copy-pasted into the space around you, as seen through your camera’s eye. Download the app, available on iOS and Android, at g.co/weirdcuts.

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Weird cuts in action 

Want to design your very own artwork with AI? Artist duo Pinar & Viola and Google engineer Alexander Mordvintsev—best known for his work on DeepDream—used machine learning to create a tool to do so. To use Infinite Patterns, upload an image and a DeepDream algorithm will transform and morph it into a unique pattern. For Pinar & Viola it is the perfect way to find new design inspirations for fashion by challenging one’s perception of shape, color and reality.

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Infinite Patterns

These experiments were created in the Google Arts & Culture Lab, where we invite artists and coders to explore how technology can inspire artistic creativity. Collaborations at the Lab gave birth to Cardboard, the affordable VR headset, and Art Selfie, which has matched millions of selfies with works of art around the world.


To continue to encourage this emerging field of art with machine intelligence, we’re announcing the Artists + Machine Intelligence Grants for contemporary artists exploring creative applications of machine learning. This program will offer artists engineering mentorship, access to core Google research, and project funding.

Machine learning and artificial intelligence are greats tool for artists, and there’s so much more to learn. If you’re curious about its origins and future, dive into the online exhibition “AI: More than Human” by the Barbican Centre, in which some of the world’s leading experts, artists and innovators explore the evolving relationship between humans and technology.


You can try our new experiments as well as the digital exhibition on the Google Arts & Culture app for iOS and Android.