Tag Archives: Android Wear

Android Wear: 20+ watches for fall

Android Wear was created to take smartwatches beyond “one size fits all.” That's why we're thrilled there are even more ways to express your style this fall—all while keeping you informed with messages at a glance, activity tracking, and help from your Google Assistant.

Android Wear Gallery

Fit for the runway

With Android Wear, you never have to sacrifice fashion for function. We've partnered with designer brands like: Diesel, Emporio Armani, Fossil, Guess, Gc, Hugo Boss, Michael Kors and Tommy Hilfiger. With a range of designs and endless watch face options, you'll always be able to find a look that matches your outfit or mood. The Michael Kors Access My Social app lets you dress up your watch face with your favorite Instagram or Facebook photos. Fossil Q Explorist and Q Venture’s unique social sharing feature lets you share your personalized watch face with friends.

Crafted for multi-tasking

If you want a watch that keeps up with your busy life, Android Wear has options. The Montblanc Summit lets you stay ahead and in style, while keeping an eye on your heart rate. The TAG Heuer Connected Modular 45 is the ultimate in customizable luxury, combining the latest technology with Swiss watchmaking—including both Android Pay and built-in GPS. Movado Connect maintains its iconic design while providing 100 watch face variations and on-watch payments with Android Pay. Want to leave your phone behind? The ZTE Quartz is smart, affordable and cellular enabled.

Stamina for active lives

With heart rate monitoring, activity tracking, GPS, music on the go and sporty designs, Android Wear has a range of watches built for your workout. The Huawei Watch 2 provides motivation with a professional running coach feature and comes fully-loaded with a heart-rate monitor, GPS and Android Pay. The Polar M600 is designed to keep you connected while you train, including smart coaching features that turn your activity and training data into actionable insights. Ticwatch S&E is great for your everyday workout, with a lightweight, breathable design, heart rate monitor and GPS antenna integrated right into the band.

Made for the journey

For the jet setter, Android Wear apps provide on-watch boarding options, travel tips, translations, world timers and maps to help guide your trip. Louis Vuitton Tambour Horizon connects you to exclusive travel apps like “LV Guide” and “My Flight,” which organizes your flight times, gates and terminals to guide your journey.

Built for adventure

From climbing to kayaking, the Casio Pro-Trek Smart is your outdoor companion. Built to military standards, the Pro-Trek is crazy tough, with unique outdoor capabilities like advanced GPS functionality and built-in sensors that measure altitudes and atmospheric pressure. With location memory and a full-color offline map, you can even track your hike and record voice-notes along the way.

Whether you’re a jetsetter or trendsetter, Android Wear has got you covered. With so many new watches to choose from, it’s never been easier to wear what you want.

Source: Android


Android Wear: 20+ watches for fall

Android Wear was created to take smartwatches beyond “one size fits all.” That's why we're thrilled there are even more ways to express your style this fall—all while keeping you informed with messages at a glance, activity tracking, and help from your Google Assistant.

Android Wear Gallery

Fit for the runway

With Android Wear, you never have to sacrifice fashion for function. We've partnered with designer brands like: Diesel, Emporio Armani, Fossil, Guess, Gc, Hugo Boss, Michael Kors and Tommy Hilfiger. With a range of designs and endless watch face options, you'll always be able to find a look that matches your outfit or mood. The Michael Kors Access My Social app lets you dress up your watch face with your favorite Instagram or Facebook photos. Fossil Q Explorist and Q Venture’s unique social sharing feature lets you share your personalized watch face with friends.

Crafted for multi-tasking

If you want a watch that keeps up with your busy life, Android Wear has options. The Montblanc Summit lets you stay ahead and in style, while keeping an eye on your heart rate. The TAG Heuer Connected Modular 45 is the ultimate in customizable luxury, combining the latest technology with Swiss watchmaking—including both Android Pay and built-in GPS. Movado Connect maintains its iconic design while providing 100 watch face variations and on-watch payments with Android Pay. Want to leave your phone behind? The ZTE Quartz is smart, affordable and cellular enabled.

Stamina for active lives

With heart rate monitoring, activity tracking, GPS, music on the go and sporty designs, Android Wear has a range of watches built for your workout. The Huawei Watch 2 provides motivation with a professional running coach feature and comes fully-loaded with a heart-rate monitor, GPS and Android Pay. The Polar M600 is designed to keep you connected while you train, including smart coaching features that turn your activity and training data into actionable insights. Ticwatch S&E is great for your everyday workout, with a lightweight, breathable design, heart rate monitor and GPS antenna integrated right into the band.

Made for the journey

For the jet setter, Android Wear apps provide on-watch boarding options, travel tips, translations, world timers and maps to help guide your trip. Louis Vuitton Tambour Horizon connects you to exclusive travel apps like “LV Guide” and “My Flight,” which organizes your flight times, gates and terminals to guide your journey.

Built for adventure

From climbing to kayaking, the Casio Pro-Trek Smart is your outdoor companion. Built to military standards, the Pro-Trek is crazy tough, with unique outdoor capabilities like advanced GPS functionality and built-in sensors that measure altitudes and atmospheric pressure. With location memory and a full-color offline map, you can even track your hike and record voice-notes along the way.

Whether you’re a jetsetter or trendsetter, Android Wear has got you covered. With so many new watches to choose from, it’s never been easier to wear what you want.

Source: Android


Updates to Google Play policy promote standalone Android Wear apps

Posted by Hoi Lam, Lead Developer Advocate, Android Wear
Strava - a standalone wear app available to both Android and iOS users

Android Wear 2.0 represents the the latest evolution of the Android Wear platform. It introduced the concept of standalone apps that can connect to the network directly and work independently of a smartphone. This is critical to providing apps not only to our Android users, but also iOS users - which is increasingly important as we continue to expand our diverse ecosystem of watches and users. In addition, Wear 2.0 brought multi-APK support to Wear apps, which reduces the APK size of your phone apps, and makes it possible for iOS users to experience your Wear apps.

Today, we are announcing that multi-APKs will also work for Android Wear 1.0 watches, so you can now reach all of your users without needing to bundle your Wear app within your phone app's APK. Additionally, the Google Play Store policy will change to promote the use of multi-APKs and standalone apps. This covers all types of apps that are designed to run on the watch, including watch faces, complication data providers as well as launchable apps.

Policy change

The policy change will be effective from the 18th of January, 2018. At this time, the following apps will lose the "Enhanced for Android Wear" badge in the Google Play Store and will not be eligible to be listed in the top charts in the Play Store for Android Wear:

  • Mobile apps that support Wear notification enhancements but do not have a separate Wear app.
  • Wear apps that are bundled with mobile apps instead of using multi-APK.

Since multi-APK is now supported by devices running Wear 1.0 and 2.0, developers embedding their Wear app APKs in phone APKs should unbundle their Wear APK and upload it to the Play Store as a multi-APK. This will allow them to continue to qualify for the "Enhanced for Android Wear" badge as well as be eligible to appear in the Android Wear top charts. The two APKs can continue to share the same package name.

In addition to providing top app charts, we periodically put together curated featured collections. To be eligible for selection for these collections, developers will need to make their Wear apps function independently from the phone, as a standalone app. These apps will need to work on watches that are paired with both iOS and Android phones.

What are standalone apps?

Standalone apps are Wear apps that do not require a phone app to run. The app either does not require network access or can access the network directly without the phone app - something that is supported by Android Wear 2.0.

To mark your app as standalone, put the following meta-data tag in the AndroidManifest.xml:

<application>
...
  <meta-data
    android:name="com.google.android.wearable.standalone"
    android:value="true" />
...
</application>

In some rare cases, the user experience may be enhanced by the syncing of data between the phone and watch. For example, a cycling app can use the watch to display the current pace, and measure the user's heart rate, while displaying a map on the phone. In this scenario, we recommend that developers ensure that their Wear apps function without a phone and treat the phone experience as optional as far as the Wear apps are concerned. In these cases, a Wear app is still considered standalone and should be marked as such in its AndroidManifest.xml file.

Wear what you want

From the beginning, Android Wear has been about wear what you want -- the styles, watches, and apps you want to wear. This latest policy change lets you highlight your Android Wear apps, giving users even more choice about what apps they want on their watches.

How to improve app design for Wear 2.0

Posted by Steven Tepper, App Quality Consultant, Google Play

Wear 2.0 launched back in February with added support for new hardware features in addition to adopting new Material Design themes, guidelines, and a simpler vertical UI pattern. It also introduces a complications API, making it easier for apps to provide data to watch faces, and watch faces to incorporate external data. The final big update was that, apps targeting Wear 2.0 now have the ability to operate in a standalone mode, without needing a connection to a companion app on the phone.

There are a few design considerations in relation to navigation, notifications, the complications API, and the standalone functionality to help you better optimize for Wear 2.0 devices:

Navigation

  1. Use the WearableDrawerLayout navigation drawer for simple and infrequent navigation: Simple navigation includes tasks such as accessing app settings, switching users or logging out. You can implement this on Wear 2.0 to switch between different views or sections of the app via a swipe down from the top of the screen, or an action drawer can be set up for context-specific actions when swiping up from the bottom of the screen.
  2. Present a navigation drawer as a single-page drawer to enable users to navigate views quickly: A navigation drawer can be presented as either a multi-page or single-page drawer. The single-page layout is useful for when the user is expected to navigate quickly between 7 or less views of the app. Remember that if the app is using a single-page drawer, the iconography should be clear and understandable as there will not be any sort of text labeling in this layout. If there are more than 7 views to navigate to or the views are not easily represented by icons, you should instead use the multi-page drawer layout.
  3. Use multiple app launchers if your app has two or three discrete functions: For example, if your app supports both activity tracking—with various options, actions, and views—and historical analysis and management of tracked activities, you can use multiple app launchers to handle these tasks. Alternatively, if your app has a simple home screen, these features could be placed in line, at the bottom of the screen.
  4. Use peeking at the top of the action drawer to provide quick access to the primary action: If there is no primary action associated with the view, override the default behavior and force an overflow button to peek instead, exposing all actions at the bottom of a view, when tapped.

Ensure that for devices using Wear 2.0, your app takes advantage of these new UI patterns to provide a consistent user experience. Check out more training resources for Wear Navigation and Actions and the Material Design specifications for Navigation and Action Drawers.

Notifications

Wear 2.0 uses a simpler vertical navigation pattern, removing the horizontal swiping gesture to present actions for a notification. Notification actions are now presented as a single primary action (if applicable) at the bottom of a notification. If there is no primary action, expanding the notification will present options in a single, vertically scrollable view.

Notifications will work without needing many changes on both 1.x and 2.0 devices, but appear quite different:

When creating apps for Wear 2.0 devices, improve the user experience with notifications by applying the following best practices:

  1. Support expandable notifications: Use BigTextStyle so that users can see more content on their watch.
  2. Use the collapsed view of the notification (if applicable): Add the primary action for your notification to the collapsed view of the notification using setContentIntent(), where appropriate.
  3. For messaging apps, use the MessagingStyle: Provide a rich chat app-like experience in the expanded notification using this style.
  4. Update user directions which are specific to Wear 1.0: Remove any text guiding users to act on a card by swiping horizontally (the Wear 1.x pattern).
  5. Enhancing notifications to use inline actions: This allows users to do things without needing tap to see the expanded notification details. Actions for messaging notifications can use several different input methods including Smart Reply presets, voice, and keyboard input. Take advantage of these features to provide added functionality and delight users.

To learn more about adding wearable features to notifications.

Complications

The complications API in Wear 2.0 makes it much easier for watch face developers and third-party data providers to surface important information users want, at a glance. Watch faces that support the API can be configured to use any of the data providers that have been installed on the watch while maintaining complete control over their appearance. Apps supporting the complication API allow the app's data to be accessible on any watch faces that support complications. These complications can be displayed in a variety of forms (short text, icon, ranged value, long text, small image, and large image) depending on what the data provider has configured and how much space has been allocated on the watch face.

To ensure that complications fit the overall design of the watch face and properly handle their data type, when adding complication support we recommend watch face makers should:

  1. Use the TextRenderer class found in the Wear 2.0 SDK: This allows the text within complications to be adjusted to their bounds by shrinking the text, dynamically supporting line breaks or ellipsizing strings when they exceed the bounds of a text-based complication.
  2. Use the ComplicationDrawable class to set the background color, shape, border, and font options for the complications: This gives complete control of how the complication is rendered to the watch face.
  3. Design the watch face to provide a way for users to configure or adjust complications on the watch face through a settings menu: To learn how to construct these settings see the watch face sample on GitHub.
  4. Use the data provider test suite app to feed dummy data to the watch face complications: This will enable you to verify that all of the complications render properly and have fonts formatted for their bounds.
  5. As a complication data provider, expose relevant data by using the ComplicationProviderService: Simply define and configure what types of ComplicationData the app can provide for complications.

Standalone functionality on Wear devices

  1. Make sure your app is able to handle itself if there is no companion app installed when using the android.hardware.type.watch hardware feature flag: Using this feature enables your app to become searchable and installable directly on Wear devices without needing to install a companion phone app, so ensure your app can handle itself to avoid a confusing or broken user experience.
  2. Ensure your wearable app doesn't rely on the phone app for sign-in/authentication or primary functionality: When requiring complicated input for authentication (for example, password entry) your wearable app can point to the companion phone, but should rely on web UI for account/password entry rather than an app.
  3. Where a companion app must be present on a phone to support your app in some other way, the app should use the CapabilityApi: This should be used to properly direct users to the Play Store listing on their companion device to install the missing app. Otherwise, the app should function on its own, using the Wear built-in Wi-Fi, GPS, or other connectivity functions.
  4. Include wording about any companion app requirements or briefly mention how your Wear app should function within the Play Store listing description: This will help set expectations and guide users to install the correct apps for the best possible experience.
  5. Incorporate the com.google.android.wearable.standalone flag in the manifest if your Wearable app can function without any phone companion interaction: This flag indicates that the wearable app can be installed and will fully function when not paired to an Android or iOS companion phone.

Though a lot was covered here, there are additional resources you can use to ensure that your apps or games are optimized and use the latest patterns and functionality on Wear. Be sure to review the quality guidelines and check out the developer training documentation to learn more best practices for wearable app development and wearable app design in order to build quality apps for Wear.

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Android Wear: New complications tools and watch friendly UI library

Posted by Hoi Lam, Lead Developer Advocate, Android Wear
Android Wear 2.0 gives users more informative watch faces and provides developers with new ways to build useful apps. These new opportunities have been well received by users and developers alike. To help developers take advantage of these new features, we have released a suite of complication API tools, to make it easier for developers to add complication support to their watch faces, and a new Wear UI library, to help developers build watch friendly user interfaces.

New Complications API tools for Watch Face developers

Complications are bite-sized pieces of information displayed directly on the watch face. They can also be great shortcuts into your favorite apps. We introduced the Complications API last year to enable watch faces to receive data from any app that the user selects, and display the data to the user in a way that is stylistically coherent. Today, we are introducing four new tools to make it easier for watch face developers to integrate with the Complications API:

  • TextRenderer - Auto-sizes text to fit in bounds defined by watch face makers.
  • ComplicationDrawable - A full rendering solution for complications, that handles all the styling for you, and adjusts the layout to fit the space you specify
  • Easy watch face settings sample - Adoptable sample code that makes it easier to build complication settings with a rich and usable experience.
  • Complication test suite - A sample data provider to help check that your watch face can handle all the combinations of fields that can make up complication data.

It's never been easier to integrate complications into your watch faces.

New Wear UI Library for Wear developers

We have provided Android view components for building watch friendly user interfaces since the launch of Android Wear 1.0. Developers have told us that they would like to see these components open sourced. So, starting at Google I/O, we are open sourcing some components and providing some Android Wear UI components in the Android Support Library. This brings a number of advantages, including more consistent APIs with the rest of the Support Library, more frequent releases, and better responsiveness to developer feedback. We will:

  • Migrate Wearable Support classes - Migrate and update Android Wear specific view components, such as WearableRecyclerView, from android.support.wearable.view in Wearable Support to android.support.wear.widget in the Android Support Library. This new package is available as open source. In terms of developer impact, we expect the migration process to be simple, with minor API name changes to bring consistency with the existing Android Support Library.
  • Merge some Android Wear functionality to Android - Some Android Wear components have a lot of overlap with Android, e.g. CircledImageView and DelayedConfirmationView. We will merge the Android Wear specific functionality with the Android counterparts under android.support.v4.widget.
  • Deprecate outdated user interface patterns - Two user interface patterns are deprecated with Android Wear 2.0: the Card pattern and the Multi-directional layout. As a result, we have deprecated all supporting classes, such as GridViewPager and CardFragment. Please refer to the class reference docs for their replacements.

In the first wave of these changes, we migrated the WearableRecyclerView, BoxInsetLayout and SwipeDismissFrameLayout classes to the new Android Wear UI Library. We expect the migration process to continue during 2017, and developers will have until mid-2018 to migrate to the new UI components. For additional information, see Using the Wear UI Library.

Get started and give us feedback!

To get started with these new tools, simply update the Android Support Library in Android Studio and update your gradle build files to import the new support libraries. In addition to the documentation links above, check out the Google I/O session - Android Wear UI development best practice - where lead engineers for these tools will be on-hand to explain the technical details.

We will continue to update these tools over the next few months, based on your feedback. The sooner we hear from you, the more we can include, so don't be shy! Let us do some of the heavy lifting for your Android Wear apps and watch faces.

On-Device Machine Intelligence



To build the cutting-edge technologies that enable conversational understanding and image recognition, we often apply combinations of machine learning technologies such as deep neural networks and graph-based machine learning. However, the machine learning systems that power most of these applications run in the cloud and are computationally intensive and have significant memory requirements. What if you want machine intelligence to run on your personal phone or smartwatch, or on IoT devices, regardless of whether they are connected to the cloud?

Yesterday, we announced the launch of Android Wear 2.0, along with brand new wearable devices, that will run Google's first entirely “on-device” ML technology for powering smart messaging. This on-device ML system, developed by the Expander research team, enables technologies like Smart Reply to be used for any application, including third-party messaging apps, without ever having to connect with the cloud…so now you can respond to incoming chat messages directly from your watch, with a tap.
The research behind this began last year while our team was developing the machine learning systems that enable conversational understanding capability in Allo and Inbox. The Android Wear team reached out to us and was interested to know whether it would be possible to deploy this Smart Reply technology directly onto a smart device. Because of the limited computing power and memory on smart devices, we quickly realized that it was not possible to do so. Our product manager, Patrick McGregor, realized that this presented a unique challenge and an opportunity for the Expander team to return to the drawing board to design a completely new, lightweight, machine learning architecture — not only to enable Smart Reply on Android Wear, but also to power a wealth of other on-device mobile applications. Together with Tom Rudick, Nathan Beach, and other colleagues from the Android Wear team, we set out to build the new system.

Learning with Projections
A simple strategy to build lightweight conversational models might be to create a small dictionary of common rules (input → reply mappings) on the device and use a naive look-up strategy at inference time. This can work for simple prediction tasks involving a small set of classes using a handful of features (such as binary sentiment classification from text, e.g. “I love this movie” conveys a positive sentiment whereas the sentence “The acting was horrible” is negative). But, it does not scale to complex natural language tasks involving rich vocabularies and the wide language variability observed in chat messages. On the other hand, machine learning models like recurrent neural networks (such as LSTMs), in conjunction with graph learning, have proven to be extremely powerful tools for complex sequence learning in natural language understanding tasks, including Smart Reply. However, compressing such rich models to fit in device memory and produce robust predictions at low computation cost (rapidly on-demand) is extremely challenging. Early experiments with restricting the model to predict only a small handful of replies or using other techniques like quantization or character-level models did not produce useful results.

Instead, we built a different solution for the on-device ML system. We first use a fast, efficient mechanism to group similar incoming messages and project them to similar (“nearby”) bit vector representations. While there are several ways to perform this projection step, such as using word embeddings or encoder networks, we employ a modified version of locality sensitive hashing (LSH) to reduce dimension from millions of unique words to a short, fixed-length sequence of bits. This allows us to compute a projection for an incoming message very fast, on-the-fly, with a small memory footprint on the device since we do not need to store the incoming messages, word embeddings, or even the full model used for training.
Projection step: Similar messages are grouped together and projected to nearby vectors. For example, the messages "hey, how's it going?" and "How's it going buddy?" share similar content and might be projected to the same vector 11100011. Another related message “Howdy, everything going well?” is mapped to a nearby vector 11100110 that differs only in 2 bits.
Next, our system takes the incoming message along with its projections and jointly trains a “message projection model” that learns to predict likely replies using our semi-supervised graph learning framework. The graph learning framework enables training a robust model by combining semantic relationships from multiple sources — message/reply interactions, word/phrase similarity, semantic cluster information — learning useful projection operations that can be mapped to good reply predictions.
Learning step: (Top) Messages along with projections and corresponding replies, if available, are used in a machine learning framework to jointly learn a “message projection model”. (Bottom) The message projection model learns to associate replies with the projections of the corresponding incoming messages. For example, the model projects two different messages “Howdy, everything going well?” and “How’s it going buddy?” (bottom center) to nearby bit vectors and learns to map these to relevant replies (bottom right).
It’s worth noting that while the message projection model can be trained using complex machine learning architectures and the power of the cloud, as described above, the model itself resides and performs inference completely on device. Apps running on the device can pass a user’s incoming messages and receive reply predictions from the on-device model without data leaving the device. The model can also be adapted to cater to the user’s writing style and individual preferences to provide a personalized experience.
Inference step: The model applies the learned projections to an incoming message (or sequence of messages) and suggests relevant and diverse replies. Inference is performed on the device, allowing the model to adapt to user data and personal writing styles.
To get the on-device system to work out of the box, we had to make a few additional improvements such as optimizing for speeding up computations on device and generating rich, diverse replies from the model. We will have a forthcoming scientific publication that describes the on-device machine learning work in more detail.

Converse from Your Wrist
When we embarked on our journey to build this technology from scratch, we weren’t sure if the predictions would be useful or of sufficient quality. We’re quite surprised and excited about how well it works even on Android wearable devices with very limited computation and memory resources. We look forward to continuing to improve the models to provide users with more delightful conversational experiences, and we will be leveraging this on-device ML platform to enable completely new applications in the months to come.

You can now use this feature to respond to your messages directly from your Google watches or any watch that runs Android Wear 2.0. It is already enabled on Google Hangouts, Google Messenger, and many third-party messaging apps. We also provide an API for developers of third-party Wear apps.

Acknowledgements
On behalf of the Google Expander team, I would also like to thank the following people who helped make this technology a success: Andrei Broder, Andrew Tomkins, David Singleton, Mirko Ranieri, Robin Dua and Yicheng Fan.

Android Wear 2.0 is here with new hardware features!

Posted by Hoi Lam, Lead Developer Advocate, Android Wear


Today, we are releasing the final SDK for Android Wear 2.0. In this release, we have added support for the new hardware features announced yesterday. If you have not done so already, it really is time to publish your apps so as to not miss the consumer hardware launch tomorrow.
Throughout the developer preview program, you have given us a lot of constructive feedback as well as bug reports. Thank you again!

Android Wear 2.0 recap



Android Wear 2.0 is our biggest update since we launched Wear in 2014, with numerous platform and developer enhancements. Some of the highlights include:
  • Material Design for Android Wear - A new system user interface and design guidelines, featuring a darker colour palette, vertical layout and visual components such as the WearableRecyclerView and WearableNavigationDrawer. We have also enhanced notifications on the watch with the new MessagingStyle rich notification style and inline actions.
  • Watch Face Complications - Complications are areas of the watch face that display information other than time. Apps can supply data to supported watch faces by creating a ComplicationProviderService, and watch faces can render this data in a style that suits the watch face design.
  • Standalone Android Wear apps and iOS support - Apps can now be downloaded directly to Wear devices via an on-watch Google Play Store. In addition, these apps can access the internet directly without relying on phone apps. This means that apps can now run on Android Wear devices that are paired to iOS devices.

New hardware support

The first two watches with Android Wear 2.0 give users more ways to interact with their smartwatches. In the final SDK, we have added API support for physical button locations and rotary input. At present, developers will need the new LG Watch Style or LG Watch Sport to test these new functionalities; however, we are working to add these new hardware features to the emulator. Stay tuned for updates! The SDK also includes a few other final bug fixes, such as support for more than three items in the Wearable Action Drawer.

App review changes

Now that Android Wear 2.0 is live, we'll soon update the Android Wear App Quality review process with two important changes. First, enhancing your phone app notifications for Android Wear will no longer be sufficient for passing the review. Second, it will soon be required that you upload a watch APK that's compatible with Android Wear 2.0. Only apps that pass these criteria will receive badging in Play Store on the phone and be eligible for top charts for Android Wear apps. These changes will ensure a more consistent experience for users and allow us to streamline the review process for you.

The journey doesn't stop here!

The Android Wear 2.0 developer preview lasted longer than we originally planned, but we think that the extra time has paid off in a big way. Thank you once again for your input and patience. You helped us achieve a higher quality bar than we could have achieved on our own.

We have integrated the Android Wear 2.0 Developer Preview documentation into the main Wear developer documentation site, and have also made factory images available for the preview devices. For developer related bugs, please continue to file developer bug reports or post comments in our Android Wear Developers community.

From the Android Wear team: Thank you again for your feedback and support!



Android Wear 2.0: Make the most of every minute

While traditional watches tell the time, Android Wear watches make the most of your time. In an instant, you can check when and where you’re meeting a friend, whether you’ll need an umbrella tonight, or how many minutes you’ve been active today—all without reaching for your phone. Today, we’re announcing Android Wear 2.0 to give you more informative watch faces, better workouts, new ways to use apps, more ways to stay in touch and on-the-go help from the Google Assistant. We’re also introducing two new watches that run Android Wear 2.0.

More personalized, helpful watch faces

You can now personalize your Android Wear always-on watch face with information and actions from your favorite apps. Simply glance at your wrist to check your next appointment, stock performance, progress on fitness goals, or whatever is important to you. A quick tap on your watch face lets you instantly order an Uber ride, start a workout, or get in touch with your significant other. Interested in different info throughout the day? Just swipe to switch your watch face as you go from the office to the gym to dinner with friends and home again.

Android Wear 2.0 Watch Face

Better ways to work out

Google Fit, the pre-installed fitness app on most Android Wear watches, now lets you track your pace, distance, calories burned and heart rate* as you’re walking, running or cycling. You can also measure weight-lifting reps, in addition to push-ups, sit-ups and squats. When you work out with a cellular-connected Android Wear watch, you can stay in touch with calls and messages, stream tunes from Google Play Music and still use your favorite apps right on your watch.

New ways to use apps

With Android Wear 2.0, you can choose which apps you want on your watch and download them directly from the new on-watch Google Play Store. If your watch has a cellular connection, you can make calls and use your watch apps no matter where your phone is. Whether you use an Android phone or iPhone, you’ll be able to use apps built for Android Wear 2.0, like AccuWeather, Android Pay*, Bring!, Foursquare, Google Fit, Google Messenger, Google Play Music, Lifesum, Robinhood, Runkeeper, Runtastic, Strava, Telegram, Uber and many more.

More ways to respond to messages

Now it’s easier than ever to read and respond to a message right from your watch. When you receive a message, you can expand the notification and tap to respond by dictating, typing or handwriting your answer, or drawing an emoji. Try it out on apps like Facebook Messenger, Glide, Google Messenger, Hangouts, Telegram or WhatsApp. Need to respond quickly and discreetly? Use Smart Reply, which instantly and intelligently suggests different responses based on the message you received.

The Google Assistant on your wrist

Android Wear 2.0 brings the Google Assistant to your wrist, so you can find answers and get things done—hands free. Ask your Google Assistant about the weather or remind yourself to bring an umbrella. Make a restaurant reservation or navigate to work. You can even update your shopping list right from your wrist. To ask for help, just hold down the power button on your watch or say “Ok Google." The Google Assistant is available in English and German on Android Wear and will be available in other languages in the coming months.

Introducing LG Watch Style and LG Watch Sport

The first watches with Android Wear 2.0 are the LG Watch Style and LG Watch Sport—both designed in collaboration with Google.


LG Watch Style & LG Watch Sport

The LG Watch Style is thin, light, beautiful to look at, and comfortable to wear. It’s available in three classic designs and finishes—silver, rose gold and titanium—and compatible with snap-and-swap 18mm leather and silicone bands out of the box, so you can quickly switch bands to match your look or the occasion. The rotating power button lets you easily scroll through your stream, bring up the app launcher, or get help from your Google Assistant.

The LG Watch Sport is Android Wear’s most powerful watch yet. Available in titanium and dark blue, the LG Watch Sport comes with a high performance elastomer strap, NFC for payments, GPS for tracking exercise and navigation, a heart rate sensor for your workouts, and cellular connectivity. With dedicated buttons for Google Fit and Android Pay, plus a rotating power button, it lets you instantly launch your favorite apps. From phone calls to payments, LG Watch Sport is pretty much everything you need whether you’re running the trails or just running some errands.

If you’re in the U.S., you can find the LG Watch Style at Best Buy and the Google Store and the LG Watch Sport at AT&T, Verizon and the Google Store, starting February 10. These watches will be available at carriers and retailers across Canada, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, South Korea, Taiwan, UAE and UK in the coming weeks.

Android Wear 2.0 will be available for all supported watches in the coming weeks. We hope Android Wear 2.0 lets you stay more informed, organized, healthy and connected to what matters most.

Android Wear: Make the most of every minute

*  Some features require hardware sensors which are not available on all Android Wear watches.


Current watches getting Android Wear 2.0 include: ASUS ZenWatch 2 & 3, Casio Smart Outdoor Watch, Casio PRO TREK Smart, Fossil Q Founder, Fossil Q Marshal, Fossil Q Wander, Huawei Watch, LG G Watch R, LG Watch Urbane & 2nd Edition LTE, Michael Kors Access Smartwatches, Moto 360 2nd Gen, Moto 360 for Women, Moto 360 Sport, New Balance RunIQ, Nixon Mission, Polar M600 and TAG Heuer Connected.


Source: Android


Android Wear 2.0: Make the most of every minute

While traditional watches tell the time, Android Wear watches make the most of your time. In an instant, you can check when and where you’re meeting a friend, whether you’ll need an umbrella tonight, or how many minutes you’ve been active today—all without reaching for your phone. Today, we’re announcing Android Wear 2.0 to give you more informative watch faces, better workouts, new ways to use apps, more ways to stay in touch and on-the-go help from the Google Assistant. We’re also introducing two new watches that run Android Wear 2.0.

Android Wear 2.0 Watch Face

More personalized, helpful watch faces

You can now personalize your Android Wear always-on watch face with information and actions from your favorite apps. Simply glance at your wrist to check your next appointment, stock performance, progress on fitness goals, or whatever is important to you. A quick tap on your watch face lets you instantly order an Uber ride, start a workout, or get in touch with your significant other. Interested in different info throughout the day? Just swipe to switch your watch face as you go from the office to the gym to dinner with friends and home again.

Better ways to work out

Google Fit, the pre-installed fitness app on most Android Wear watches, now lets you track your pace, distance, calories burned and heart rate* as you’re walking, running or cycling. You can also measure weight-lifting reps, in addition to push-ups, sit-ups and squats. When you work out with a cellular-connected Android Wear watch, you can stay in touch with calls and messages, stream tunes from Google Play Music and still use your favorite apps right on your watch.

New ways to use apps

With Android Wear 2.0, you can choose which apps you want on your watch and download them directly from the new on-watch Google Play Store. If your watch has a cellular connection, you can make calls and use your watch apps no matter where your phone is. Whether you use an Android phone or iPhone, you’ll be able to use apps built for Android Wear 2.0, like AccuWeather, Android Pay*, Bring!, Foursquare, Google Fit, Google Messenger, Google Play Music, Lifesum, Robinhood, Runkeeper, Runtastic, Strava, Telegram, Uber and many more.

More ways to respond to messages

Now it’s easier than ever to read and respond to a message right from your watch. When you receive a message, you can expand the notification and tap to respond by dictating, typing or handwriting your answer, or drawing an emoji. Try it out on apps like Facebook Messenger, Glide, Google Messenger, Hangouts, Telegram or WhatsApp. Need to respond quickly and discreetly? Use Smart Reply, which instantly and intelligently suggests different responses based on the message you received.

The Google Assistant on your wrist

Android Wear 2.0 brings the Google Assistant to your wrist, so you can find answers and get things done—hands free. Ask your Google Assistant about the weather or remind yourself to bring an umbrella. Make a restaurant reservation or navigate to work. You can even update your shopping list right from your wrist. To ask for help, just hold down the power button on your watch or say “Ok Google." The Google Assistant is available in English and German on Android Wear and will be available in other languages in the coming months.

Introducing LG Watch Style and LG Watch Sport

The first watches with Android Wear 2.0 are the LG Watch Style and LG Watch Sport—both designed in collaboration with Google.


LG Watch Style & LG Watch Sport

The LG Watch Style is thin, light, beautiful to look at, and comfortable to wear. It’s available in three classic designs and finishes—silver, rose gold and titanium—and compatible with snap-and-swap 18mm leather and silicone bands out of the box, so you can quickly switch bands to match your look or the occasion. The rotating power button lets you easily scroll through your stream, bring up the app launcher, or get help from your Google Assistant.

The LG Watch Sport is Android Wear’s most powerful watch yet. Available in titanium and dark blue, the LG Watch Sport comes with a high performance elastomer strap, NFC for payments, GPS for tracking exercise and navigation, a heart rate sensor for your workouts, and cellular connectivity. With dedicated buttons for Google Fit and Android Pay, plus a rotating power button, it lets you instantly launch your favorite apps. From phone calls to payments, LG Watch Sport is pretty much everything you need whether you’re running the trails or just running some errands.

If you’re in the U.S., you can find the LG Watch Style at Best Buy and the Google Store and the LG Watch Sport at AT&T, Verizon and the Google Store, starting February 10. These watches will be available at carriers and retailers across Canada, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, South Korea, Taiwan, UAE and UK in the coming weeks.

Android Wear 2.0 will be available for all supported watches in the coming weeks. We hope Android Wear 2.0 lets you stay more informed, organized, healthy and connected to what matters most.

Android Wear: Make the most of every minute

*  Some features require hardware sensors which are not available on all Android Wear watches.


Current watches getting Android Wear 2.0 include: ASUS ZenWatch 2 & 3, Casio Smart Outdoor Watch, Casio PRO TREK Smart, Fossil Q Founder, Fossil Q Marshal, Fossil Q Wander, Huawei Watch, LG G Watch R, LG Watch Urbane & 2nd Edition LTE, Michael Kors Access Smartwatches, Moto 360 2nd Gen, Moto 360 for Women, Moto 360 Sport, New Balance RunIQ, Nixon Mission, Polar M600 and TAG Heuer Connected.


Android Wear 2.0: Make the most of every minute

While traditional watches tell the time, Android Wear watches make the most of your time. In an instant, you can check when and where you’re meeting a friend, whether you’ll need an umbrella tonight, or how many minutes you’ve been active today—all without reaching for your phone. Today, we’re announcing Android Wear 2.0 to give you more informative watch faces, better workouts, new ways to use apps, more ways to stay in touch and on-the-go help from the Google Assistant. We’re also introducing two new watches that run Android Wear 2.0.

Android Wear 2.0 Watch Face

More personalized, helpful watch faces

You can now personalize your Android Wear always-on watch face with information and actions from your favorite apps. Simply glance at your wrist to check your next appointment, stock performance, progress on fitness goals, or whatever is important to you. A quick tap on your watch face lets you instantly order an Uber ride, start a workout, or get in touch with your significant other. Interested in different info throughout the day? Just swipe to switch your watch face as you go from the office to the gym to dinner with friends and home again.

Better ways to work out

Google Fit, the pre-installed fitness app on most Android Wear watches, now lets you track your pace, distance, calories burned and heart rate* as you’re walking, running or cycling. You can also measure weight-lifting reps, in addition to push-ups, sit-ups and squats. When you work out with a cellular-connected Android Wear watch, you can stay in touch with calls and messages, stream tunes from Google Play Music and still use your favorite apps right on your watch.

New ways to use apps

With Android Wear 2.0, you can choose which apps you want on your watch and download them directly from the new on-watch Google Play Store. If your watch has a cellular connection, you can make calls and use your watch apps no matter where your phone is. Whether you use an Android phone or iPhone, you’ll be able to use apps built for Android Wear 2.0, like AccuWeather, Android Pay*, Bring!, Foursquare, Google Fit, Google Messenger, Google Play Music, Lifesum, Robinhood, Runkeeper, Runtastic, Strava, Telegram, Uber and many more.

More ways to respond to messages

Now it’s easier than ever to read and respond to a message right from your watch. When you receive a message, you can expand the notification and tap to respond by dictating, typing or handwriting your answer, or drawing an emoji. Try it out on apps like Facebook Messenger, Glide, Google Messenger, Hangouts, Telegram or WhatsApp. Need to respond quickly and discreetly? Use Smart Reply, which instantly and intelligently suggests different responses based on the message you received.

The Google Assistant on your wrist

Android Wear 2.0 brings the Google Assistant to your wrist, so you can find answers and get things done—hands free. Ask your Google Assistant about the weather or remind yourself to bring an umbrella. Make a restaurant reservation or navigate to work. You can even update your shopping list right from your wrist. To ask for help, just hold down the power button on your watch or say “Ok Google." The Google Assistant is available in English and German on Android Wear and will be available in other languages in the coming months.

Introducing LG Watch Style and LG Watch Sport

The first watches with Android Wear 2.0 are the LG Watch Style and LG Watch Sport—both designed in collaboration with Google.


LG Watch Style & LG Watch Sport

The LG Watch Style is thin, light, beautiful to look at, and comfortable to wear. It’s available in three classic designs and finishes—silver, rose gold and titanium—and compatible with snap-and-swap 18mm leather and silicone bands out of the box, so you can quickly switch bands to match your look or the occasion. The rotating power button lets you easily scroll through your stream, bring up the app launcher, or get help from your Google Assistant.

The LG Watch Sport is Android Wear’s most powerful watch yet. Available in titanium and dark blue, the LG Watch Sport comes with a high performance elastomer strap, NFC for payments, GPS for tracking exercise and navigation, a heart rate sensor for your workouts, and cellular connectivity. With dedicated buttons for Google Fit and Android Pay, plus a rotating power button, it lets you instantly launch your favorite apps. From phone calls to payments, LG Watch Sport is pretty much everything you need whether you’re running the trails or just running some errands.

If you’re in the U.S., you can find the LG Watch Style at Best Buy and the Google Store and the LG Watch Sport at AT&T, Verizon and the Google Store, starting February 10. These watches will be available at carriers and retailers across Canada, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, South Korea, Taiwan, UAE and UK in the coming weeks.

Android Wear 2.0 will be available for all supported watches in the coming weeks. We hope Android Wear 2.0 lets you stay more informed, organized, healthy and connected to what matters most.

Android Wear: Make the most of every minute

*  Some features require hardware sensors which are not available on all Android Wear watches.


Current watches getting Android Wear 2.0 include: ASUS ZenWatch 2 & 3, Casio Smart Outdoor Watch, Casio PRO TREK Smart, Fossil Q Founder, Fossil Q Marshal, Fossil Q Wander, Huawei Watch, LG G Watch R, LG Watch Urbane & 2nd Edition LTE, Michael Kors Access Smartwatches, Moto 360 2nd Gen, Moto 360 for Women, Moto 360 Sport, New Balance RunIQ, Nixon Mission, Polar M600 and TAG Heuer Connected.


Source: Android