Category Archives: YouTube Blog

The Official YouTube Blog

YouTube Music App now preinstalled on Android 10 devices

YouTube Music is your personal guide through the complete world of music—whether it’s a hot new song, hard to find gem, or an unmissable music video. Music fans on Android phones can now easily unlock the magic of YouTube Music, which will come installed on all new devices launching with Android 10 (and Android 9), including the Pixel series.
Music listeners on Android devices are now just a few taps away from streaming their go-to tracks and discovering new music. From the gym, to the car, to work—it’s all here, right in your back pocket. Discover official songs, albums and playlists, music videos, remixes, live performances, hard-to-find music, and more. Whatever your mood, we’ve got you covered.
Once you’ve started your new device, just look for the YouTube Music icon and start listening! And if you don’t have Android 10 yet, don’t stress—simply visit the Play Store to get the app.
In addition to YouTube Music, Android 10 brings new features like suggested actions in Smart Reply, improved Digital Wellbeing tools, Dark theme, and much more. Google Play Music listeners with new Android 10 devices can continue to enjoy Google Play Music by downloading it from the Play Store and logging in to their accounts.
Brandon Bilinski, Product Manager - YouTube Music
Brandon recently listened to The Man Who Married a Robot / Love Theme by The 1975.

Source: YouTube Blog


Appeal of Conscience Foundation Remarks

The following speech was delivered last night by Susan Wojcicki at the Appeal of Conscience Foundation Awards Dinner. Founded in 1965, the Appeal of Conscience Foundation is an interfaith coalition of business and religious leaders that works to promote religious freedom and human rights throughout the world.



It’s an honor to be here tonight.

You’ve helped create a more peaceful world, and your work to bring diverse voices together is particularly important to me.

I have a deep appreciation for interfaith discussions, since I saw them around the kitchen table in my childhood. My mother came from a religious Jewish family and my father came from a Polish Catholic family. And as a result, I grew up learning to accept and appreciate so many different points of view.

For more than 50 years, the Appeal of Conscience Foundation has promoted mutual understanding.

At YouTube, we haven’t been around quite as longjust 14 years, to be exact. But we have a similar mission. We’re enabling understanding through digital dialogue, and we’re bringing people together with shared interests in virtual communities.

I was lucky I was one of the few people in the world to see online videos when this medium started. The first video I saw was of some purple puppets singing in a foreign language. I wasn’t sure what to think. When it ended there was a long pause because none of us knew what to think. And then my kids shouted, “Play it again!”

As more videos came online there were wacky and funny videos, but also many videos of people talking directly to the camera sharing something important about their livesa passion, a funny moment or a hard day.

It was immediately clear to me that people wanted to share their stories with others. But what surprised me even more is that so many other people wanted to hear these stories. From the very beginning, I could see that YouTube was a place for coming together in new ways and sharing our humanity.

Today, two billion people come to YouTube every month. Their reasons are differentsome want to connect with others around a shared passion like woodworking or see the latest in fashion. Others want to watch the hottest music video, learn a foreign language, listen to religious sermons of all faiths, or perfect a job skill.

For the first time in history, with a phone and an internet connection, everyone can access a global video library and anyone can post videos and find a global audience. We call the people who publish videos “creators.”

There are more than 500 hours of video uploaded to YouTube every minute by creators.

Collectively, creators have generated the world’s largest video library of How To contentfrom how to play an instrument to how to fix an appliance. And they’ve created new mediums like vlogging, gaming and music mashups.

But we know that with this scale comes responsibility. That’s why responsibility is my number one priority.

Before I talk further about our important work on this front, I’d like to share a few examples of how online spaces foster dialogue and help build mutual understanding.

When I watched my first YouTube video, I could never have imagined that someday a teenager named Claire Wineland would start a YouTube channel out of her bedroom in California to cope with the complications of living with cystic fibrosis.

Claire saw the way we treat illness in our society, and she wanted something different. Claire passed away last year, but she leaves behind a legacy of videos to help us understand how to support someone who is struggling with serious medical issues.

When I watched my first YouTube video, I never could have imagined that someday Jenny Doan, a mother of seven in Missouri, would create a business out of quilt making by posting How To Quilt videos on YouTube.

Ten years after her son first encouraged her to post a tutorial, her channel has helped to transform her town into what they now call "the Disneyland of quilting"creating jobs and drawing thousands of tourists every month who share a passion for quilting.

Every day, there are many more stories like these unfolding on YouTube.

And that’s why I’m so focused on our responsibility. It’s critical that we get this right.

Our responsibility efforts are focused on the 4 Rs:


  • Our first RRemove. We’re removing content that violates our policies as quickly as possible. In the last quarter alone, we removed 9 million videos, the majority of which were first flagged by machines and removed before even getting a single view.



  • Second, Raise: we raise up authoritative voices in searches and recommendations for news and information,



  • Third, Reduce: we’re reducing recommendations of the content that brushes up against our policies,



  • And finally, Reward. We set an even higher bar for videos on YouTube that make money on our site.


We’re working hard to implement all of the four Rs in a way that’s both fair and transparent for all our users and creators.

That’s why we’re continuing to invest in cutting-edge machine learning technology and why we’ve dedicated more than 10,000 people across Google to take on problematic videos.

These are historic times. Never before have we had the opportunity for so many around the globe to connect online, express their points of view, and create virtual communities, all under the same roof.

Having a digital town square where the world can come together and discuss everything has created some challenges…but it has also created extraordinary opportunities.

It’s these opportunities that inspire me every day. As we take on these complicated and unprecedented issues of responsibility at scale, I think about the decisions of today through the lens of the future. What will the critics say when they write their commentaries about this unique period of time?

I want to be sure that we’re on the right side of history, providing a blueprint for open platforms to protect but also empower the next generation of storytellers.

Thank you to the Appeal of Conscience Foundation for your efforts, and for encouraging all of us to make the world a better place.

Source: YouTube Blog


Maintaining credibility and consistency on YouTube: Revisions to YouTube Music Charts and 24-hour record debut policy

From “American Bandstand” to “TRL,” every generation naturally finds its own barometer to measure the hottest songs and artists of the moment. For this generation, it’s YouTube. There is simply no better current measure of the world’s music listening than YouTube. Every day, we strive to showcase and celebrate the hottest artists, songs and music videos from around the world.

Today, we’re sharing some important changes made to YouTube Music Charts, the go-to destination to see what’s popular, what’s rising and trending both locally and globally on YouTube, and updates to how we determine videos that are eligible for 24-hour record debuts on YouTube.

YouTube Music Charts have become an indispensable source for the industry and the most accurate place for measuring the popularity of music listening behavior happening on the world’s largest music platform. In an effort to provide more transparency to the industry and align with the policies of official charting companies such as Billboard and Nielsen, we are no longer counting paid advertising views on YouTube in the YouTube Music Charts calculation. Artists will now be ranked based on view counts from organic plays.

Over the last few years, fans, artists, and their teams have touted the number of views a video receives on YouTube within the first 24 hours as the definitive representation of its instant cultural impact. It’s a great honor and one we take very seriously. As we look to maintain consistency and credibility across our platform, we’ve made some necessary revisions to our methodology for reporting 24-hour record debuts.

Our goal is to ensure YouTube remains a place where all artists are accurately recognized and celebrated for achieving success and milestones. Videos eligible for YouTube’s 24-hour record debuts are those with the highest views from organic sources within the first 24 hours of the video’s public release. This includes direct links to the video, search results, external sites that embed the video and YouTube features like the homepage, watch next and Trending. Video advertising is an effective way to reach specific audiences with a song debut, but paid advertising views on YouTube will no longer be considered when looking at a 24-hour record debut. The changes will not impact YouTube’s existing 24-hour record debut holders.

Staying true to YouTube’s overall mission of giving everyone a voice and showing them the world, we want to celebrate all artist achievements on YouTube as determined by their global fans. It’s the artists and fans that have made YouTube the best and most accurate measure of the world's listening tastes, and we intend on keeping it that way.

Additional information on how YouTube Music Charts are calculated can be found here and additional details about YouTube Views and ads can be found here.

Source: YouTube Blog


Welcome to YouTube.com/Fashion!

Exciting day for fashion fans: Today, we’re launching YouTube.com/Fashion, a single destination for style content on YouTube. My team likes to call this new hub “slash fashion” and it’ll feature original content from the biggest names in the industry, as well as the popular content that users have come to expect from the world of YouTube. Each shelf is chock-full of compelling videos from fashion and beauty creators, industry professionals, publishers, and luxury fashion brands.




When I joined YouTube a little more than a year ago, I immediately saw the platform’s insatiable desire for more fashion and beauty! And the data backs it up: From 2014 to 2018, the number of Fashion & Beauty channels on YouTube has grown over 6x, generating billions of views in the last year alone.

My response? Give the people what they want! The aim for /Fashion is to create an ultimate destination for style content that bridges both our fabulous endemic creator community and the more traditional worlds of fashion and beauty. My hope is that anyone looking for all things style will now have a place to come and be inspired by what they see.


Here’s what to expect:

Style content from your favorite YouTube creators


Creators are, and always will be, the heartbeat of our platform and /Fashion is no exception. We’ll have a featured section dedicated to creators where you can get ready with Camila Coelho, join Jenn Im for a Fendi fashion show in Rome, watch Ingrid Nilsen attend the CFDA Awards with Chanel, and comment on style challenges from Safiya Nygaard. Looking for the latest in beauty? Check out our ‘Beauty Today’ section where you can find content from gurus such as Jackie Aina and Huda Beauty.

Industry collaborations


One of the most thrilling parts of the new Fashion & Beauty department has been to foster collaborations between fashion brands and our creators. Look no further than Louis Vuitton, who teamed up with Emma Chamberlain and the Dolan Twins; and Dior, who invited Wengie, the Merrell Twins, Dulceida and Juanpa Zurita to their shows in the past 12 months to create fabulous fashion content. We’ve also helped established creators welcome new fashion professionals onto the platform, like when RuPaul’s Drag Race winner (and fledging YouTube creator) Violet Chachki teamed up with Gigi Gorgeous for a makeup makeover.

Straight from the Runway


Just in time for the kickoff of September Fashion Month, we’ll be livestreaming the latest collections straight from the runway, including Ralph Lauren, Michael Kors, Dior and more. We’ll also take you behind-the-scenes with “Stories of Style,” giving you an inside look into the industry with content from fashion favorites, such as Alexander Wang, Rosie Huntington-Whiteley and Alexa Chung. (PS. While I have you, check out this vlog comedian Pete Davidson did of walking the Wang runway this summer.)

Industry access


We’re also excited to bring new voices onto YouTube from across the industry, including fashion professionals, publishers and brands. One of our breakouts has been ‘Being Naomi,’ Naomi Campbell’s new channel that covers everything from her preflight routine to her emotional return to the Valentino runway. Go behind-the-scenes with LOVE Magazine and British Vogue for fresh takes on industry icons and join Gucci for their ‘Second Summer of Love’ collaboration with Frieze.

Our goal is to make YouTube.com/Fashion a diverse and inclusive place, filled with the latest fashion and beauty trends, content and more. We’ll be working over the coming months to bring more international voices to the page and to localize for global markets. We can’t wait for you to explore our new offering, get inspired by all the great content, and share your favorites with friends. Be sure to come back often, as we have a lot more to come!

Derek Blasberg, Director of YouTube Fashion and Beauty

Source: YouTube Blog


An update on kids and data protection on YouTube

Responsibility is our number one priority at YouTube, and nothing is more important than protecting kids and their privacy. We’ve been significantly investing in the policies, products and practices to help us do this. From its earliest days, YouTube has been a site for people over 13, but with a boom in family content and the rise of shared devices, the likelihood of children watching without supervision has increased. We’ve been taking a hard look at areas where we can do more to address this, informed by feedback from parents, experts, and regulators, including COPPA concerns raised by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission and the New York Attorney General that we are addressing with a settlement announced today.

New data practices for children’s content on YouTube


We are changing how we treat data for children’s content on YouTube. Starting in about four months, we will treat data from anyone watching children’s content on YouTube as coming from a child, regardless of the age of the user. This means that we will limit data collection and use on videos made for kids only to what is needed to support the operation of the service. We will also stop serving personalized ads on this content entirely, and some features will no longer be available on this type of content, like comments and notifications. In order to identify content made for kids, creators will be required to tell us when their content falls in this category, and we’ll also use machine learning to find videos that clearly target young audiences, for example those that have an emphasis on kids characters, themes, toys, or games.


Improvements to YouTube Kids


We continue to recommend parents use YouTube Kids if they plan to allow kids under 13 to watch independently. Tens of millions of people use YouTube Kids every week but we want even more parents to be aware of the app and its benefits. We’re increasing our investments in promoting YouTube Kids to parents with a campaign that will run across YouTube. We’re also continuing to improve the product. For example, we recently raised the bar for which channels can be a part of YouTube Kids, drastically reducing the number of channels on the app. And we’re bringing the YouTube Kids experience to the desktop.

Investing in family creators


We know these changes will have a significant business impact on family and kids creators who have been building both wonderful content and thriving businesses, so we've worked to give impacted creators four months to adjust before changes take effect on YouTube. We recognize this won’t be easy for some creators and are committed to working with them through this transition and providing resources to help them better understand these changes.

We are also going to continue investing in the future of quality kids, family and educational content. We are establishing a $100 million fund, disbursed over three years, dedicated to the creation of thoughtful, original children’s content on YouTube and YouTube Kids globally.

Training our teams


Championing the protections we have in place for children is a shared responsibility across the company. To that end, we are introducing new, mandatory annual training for our teams about our requirements in this area.

Today’s changes will allow us to better protect kids and families on YouTube, and this is just the beginning. We'll continue working with lawmakers around the world in this area, including as the FTC seeks comments on COPPA. And in the coming months, we’ll share details on how we’re rethinking our overall approach to kids and families, including a dedicated kids experience on YouTube. I have the privilege of working alongside parents who deeply care about protecting kids. We know how important it is to provide children, families and family creators the best experience possible on YouTube and we are committed to getting it right.

Susan Wojcicki

Source: YouTube Blog


The Four Rs of Responsibility, Part 1: Removing harmful content

Over the past several years, we’ve redoubled our efforts to live up to our responsibility while preserving the power of an open platform. Our work has been organized around four principles:




Over the next several months, we’ll provide more detail on the work supporting each of these principles. This first installment will focus on "Remove." We've been removing harmful content since YouTube started, but our investment in this work has accelerated in recent years. Below is a snapshot of our most notable improvements since 2016. Because of this ongoing work, over the last 18 months we’ve reduced views on videos that are later removed for violating our policies by 80%, and we’re continuously working to reduce this number further.1




Developing policies for a global platform


Before we do the work of removing content that violates our policies, we have to make sure the line between what we remove and what we allow is drawn in the right place — with a goal of preserving free expression, while also protecting and promoting a vibrant community. To that end, we have a dedicated policy development team that systematically reviews all of our policies to ensure that they are current, keep our community safe, and do not stifle YouTube’s openness.

After reviewing a policy, we often discover that fundamental changes aren’t needed, but still uncover areas that are vague or confusing to the community. As a result, many updates are actually clarifications to our existing guidelines. For example, earlier this year we provided more detail about when we consider a “challenge” to be too dangerous for YouTube. Since 2018, we’ve made dozens of updates to our enforcement guidelines, many of them minor clarifications but some more substantive.

For particularly complex issues, we may spend several months developing a new policy. During this time we consult outside experts and YouTube creators to understand how our current policy is falling short, and consider regional differences to make sure proposed changes can be applied fairly around the world.

Our hate speech update represented one such fundamental shift in our policies. We spent months carefully developing the policy and working with our teams to create the necessary trainings and tools required to enforce it. The policy was launched in early June, and as our teams review and remove more content in line with the new policy, our machine detection will improve in tandem. Though it can take months for us to ramp up enforcement of a new policy, the profound impact of our hate speech policy update is already evident in the data released in this quarter’s Community Guidelines Enforcement Report:



The spikes in removal numbers are in part due to the removal of older comments, videos and channels that were previously permitted. In April 2019, we announced that we are also working to update our harassment policy, including creator-on-creator harassment. We’ll share our progress on this work in the coming months.

Using machines to flag bad content


Once we’ve defined a policy, we rely on a combination of people and technology to flag content for our review teams. We sometimes use hashes (or “digital fingerprints”) to catch copies of known violative content before they are ever made available to view. For some content, like child sexual abuse images (CSAI) and terrorist recruitment videos, we contribute to shared industry databases of hashes to increase the volume of content our machines can catch at upload.

In 2017, we expanded our use of machine learning technology to help detect potentially violative content and send it for human review. Machine learning is well-suited to detect patterns, which helps us to find content similar (but not exactly the same) to other content we’ve already removed, even before it’s ever viewed. These systems are particularly effective at flagging content that often looks the same — such as spam or adult content. Machines also can help to flag hate speech and other violative content, but these categories are highly dependent on context and highlight the importance of human review to make nuanced decisions. Still, over 87% of the 9 million videos we removed in the second quarter of 2019 were first flagged by our automated systems.

We’re investing significantly in these automated detection systems, and our engineering teams continue to update and improve them month by month. For example, an update to our spam detection systems in the second quarter of 2019 lead to a more than 50% increase in the number of channels we terminated for violating our spam policies.

Removing content before it’s widely viewed


We go to great lengths to make sure content that breaks our rules isn’t widely viewed, or even viewed at all, before it’s removed. As noted above, improvements in our automated flagging systems have helped us detect and review content even before it’s flagged by our community, and consequently more than 80% of those auto-flagged videos were removed before they received a single view in the second quarter of 2019.

We also recognize that the best way to quickly remove content is to anticipate problems before they emerge. In January of 2018 we launched our Intelligence Desk, a team that monitors the news, social media and user reports in order to detect new trends surrounding inappropriate content, and works to make sure our teams are prepared to address them before they can become a larger issue.

We’re determined to continue reducing exposure to videos that violate our policies. That’s why, across Google, we’ve tasked over 10,000 people with detecting, reviewing, and removing content that violates our guidelines.



For example, the nearly 30,000 videos we removed for hate speech over the last month generated just 3% of the views that knitting videos did over the same time period.

Last week we updated our Community Guidelines Enforcement Report, a quarterly report that provides additional insight into the amount of content we remove from YouTube, why it was removed, and how it was first detected. That report demonstrates how technology deployed over the last several years has helped us to remove harmful content from YouTube more quickly than ever before. It also highlights how human expertise is still a critical component of our enforcement efforts, as we work to develop thoughtful policies, review content with care, and responsibly deploy our machine learning technology.





1 From January, 2018 - June, 2019

2 Nov 16, 2016; https://youtube.googleblog.com/2016/11/more-parental-controls-available-in.html

2 June 18, 2017; https://www.blog.google/around-the-globe/google-europe/four-steps-were-taking-today-fight-online-terror/

2 July 31, 2017; https://youtube.googleblog.com/2017/07/global-internet-forum-to-counter.html

2 Aug 1, 2017; https://youtube.googleblog.com/2017/08/an-update-on-our-commitment-to-fight.html

2 Dec 4, 2017; https://youtube.googleblog.com/2017/12/expanding-our-work-against-abuse-of-our.html

2 April 23, 2018; https://youtube.googleblog.com/2018/04/more-information-faster-removals-more.html

2 Dec 1, 2018; https://youtube.googleblog.com/2019/06/an-update-on-our-efforts-to-protect.html

2 Jan 15, 2019; https://support.google.com/youtube/thread/1063296?hl=en

2 Feb 19, 2019; https://youtube-creators.googleblog.com/2019/02/making-our-strikes-system-clear-and.html

2 Feb 28, 2019; https://youtube-creators.googleblog.com/2019/02/more-updates-on-our-actions-related-to.html

2 June 5, 2019; https://youtube.googleblog.com/2019/06/our-ongoing-work-to-tackle-hate.html

2 July 1, 2019; https://support.google.com/youtube/thread/8830320

2 Aug 21, 2019; https://support.google.com/youtube/thread/12506319?hl=en

2 Coming soon; https://youtube.googleblog.com/2019/06/taking-harder-look-at-harassment.html

Source: YouTube Blog


Take your tunes on the road: YouTube Music comes to Waze

Drivers, rejoice! Never worry again about switching between YouTube Music (to listen) and Waze (to navigate). Rolling out today, YouTube Premium and Music Premium subscribers can safely listen to their favorite music from directly within the Waze app, where they get their directions. All of the albums, playlists, personalized mixes, and more that fans love to listen to are now available with a couple of quick taps as they navigate to where they need to go. With YouTube Music and Waze together in one experience, there has never been a more entertaining way to get around.



To listen to your favorites in YouTube Music as you drive with Waze, download the YouTube Music app for Android or iOS and start your free trial of YouTube Music Premium. Follow these simple steps to start listening:

  • Open the Waze app
  • Tap the music note icon to select YouTube Music as your audio app, and start enjoying your audio content directly from Waze.
  • Don’t see the music note icon? Head to Settings > Audio Player to turn on “Show Audio Player”


Rolling out from today and soon available to all 50 markets where both YouTube Music and Waze are accessible, subscribers can now easily play music as they drive safely. Check out these YouTube Music playlists to queue up while on the road, and happy cruising!


  • New Release Mix - Catch up on the latest drops as you drive, with this playlist filled with brand new music, selected just for you.
  • Dance Pop Bangers - Soundtrack your party, or your road trip, with these party hits.


Lawrence Kennedy

Product Manager, YouTube Music

Lawrence recently listened to Dance Pop Bangers while driving with Waze

Source: YouTube Blog


Queen launches ‘You Are The Champions’ campaign, giving fans a chance to star in three new user-generated videos on YouTube

Queen — in partnership with YouTube Music, Universal Music Group and Hollywood Records —has launched "You Are The Champions," a unique new campaign that gives fans an exclusive chance to become a part of Queen history with a starring role in three brand-new, user-generated videos for three of the band’s most celebrated tracks. The campaign launched to celebrate Queen’s iconic music video for “Bohemian Rhapsody,” becoming the first pre-1990s video to reach one billion views on YouTube.

Speaking from the band’s current sold-out North American tour, founding Queen members Brian May and Roger Taylor said, “We are honoured that Bohemian Rhapsody has just hit one billion views on YouTube. We want to thank you all and celebrate with our amazing fans all around the world by creating three new music videos to our songs, all featuring you! Whether you are a musician, singer, dancer, visual artist or you just want to have some fun. Go to youarethechampions.com to find out more and we’ll see you on the road somewhere.”

As part of the campaign, musicians, singers, and instrumentalists can take on "Bohemian Rhapsody." Visual artists will get the chance to design any word or phrase from the lyrics of "A Kind of Magic." And, finally, dancers will be able to give their own interpretations for "Don't Stop Me Now," with a special instructional video created by Polly Bennett (Rami Malek’s movement coach from the hit film, “Bohemian Rhapsody”).

“I was so happy to be asked to choreograph for this initiative,” said famed movement director and choreographer, Bennett. “Rami (Malek) and I spent a lot of time moving to Queen’s music while filming ‘Bohemian Rhapsody,’ so I’m thrilled to encourage the world to do the same. Get dancing! I can’t wait to see what you make.”

In addition to the three music videos created by user content, a fourth video for "We Will Rock You" will re-create the song's iconic BOOM BOOM CLAP using a collage of sporting event sounds. As a result, the new version will live as a sonic homage to the song's energized relationship with sports.

Fans can visit youarethechampions.com to find out more and add their submissions* through August 18 by 11:59 p.m. ET. The final videos will be available on Queen’s official YouTube channel this fall.

*Terms and Conditions for UGC submissions here.

Source: YouTube Blog


YouTube brings the sights and sounds of Lollapalooza 2019 to millions of music fans around the world with official live stream

YouTube will exclusively bring the biggest performances from Grant Park, Chicago to millions of music fans all over the world with the official live stream of Lollapalooza 2019, August 1 to 4. Iconic music moments from artists including twenty one pilots, The Revivalists, Janelle Monae, Rüfüs Du Sol and more will also be available via the live stream within the YouTube Music app.

In addition to curated performances throughout the four-day festival, YouTube Originals is partnering with Lollapalooza to produce original creative content, including backstage moments and exclusive artist moments just before they take the stage to be featured in and around the live stream. YouTube Music will amplify the Lollapalooza experience by presenting Lollapalooza themed playlists, The Lineup and Emerging Artists, to give fans another way to find all the music they love in one place.

YouTube’s live streams bring the festival experience into the hands and homes of millions of fans around the world. There is no other platform of its kind that allows artists to connect with a global audience and share their creativity in both visual and audio formats with billions of viewers around the globe, making the world smaller and music more expansive. The 2019 Lollapalooza live stream is presented by COVERGIRL, Warner Bros. Pictures (for the film "Blinded by the Light"), and T-Mobile.

Subscribe to Lollapalooza’s YouTube Channel for up-to-date information on when your favorite artists are streaming live, and follow @youtubemusic on Instagram and Twitter for behind-the-scenes moments all weekend long. There, you can watch the latest videos and relive past moments.

Source: YouTube Blog


Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism: An update on our progress

In summer 2017, Facebook, YouTube, Microsoft and Twitter came together to form the Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism (GIFCT).

The objective of the GIFCT has always been to substantially disrupt terrorists’ ability to promote terrorism, disseminate violent extremist propaganda, and exploit or glorify real-world acts of violence on our services. We do this by joining forces with counterterrorism experts in government, civil society and the wider industry around the world. Our work centers around three, interrelated strategies:


  • Joint tech innovation
  • Knowledge sharing
  • Conducting and funding research


Today, building on the commitments we made as part of the Christchurch Call to Action, we are adding a fourth pillar to our work that will focus on crisis response. Specifically, we are introducing joint content incident protocols for responding to emerging or active events, such as the horrific terrorist attack in Christchurch, so that relevant information can be quickly and efficiently shared, processed and acted upon by all member companies. We are also releasing our first GIFCT Transparency Report and a new counterspeech campaign toolkit that will help activists and civil society organizations challenge the voices of extremism online.

And as we head into our third year as GIFCT, we are pleased to welcome Pinterest and Dropbox as members. We will continue to add new members, particularly smaller companies, that could benefit from the collective experience of GIFCT members.

More than 200,000 unique hashes now in our joint database


When terrorists misuse the internet, they often upload the same piece of content to multiple platforms to maximize their reach. To disrupt this behavior, we jointly developed a shared industry database of “hashes” — or digital fingerprints — that allows us to safely share known terrorist images and video propaganda with partner companies. This enables us to more quickly identify and take action against potential terrorist content on our respective platforms.

The shared database predates the creation of GIFCT, but over the last couple years, we have significantly increased the volume of hashes within the database. In 2018, for example, we set and achieved our goal of reaching 100,000 unique hashes. And in the first six months of this year, we’ve already doubled that number, and we now have more than 200,000 unique hashes in the database.

As we take steps to deliver on the four collaborative actions set forth in the Christchurch Call to Action, we’re expanding the shared industry database so that it extends beyond photos and videos to include URLs that lead to known terrorist and violent extremist content online.

First GIFCT Transparency Report


We have heard, loud and clear, from government and civil society that we need to be more transparent about what we are working on as an industry. As a result, today we are releasing our first-ever GIFCT Transparency Report. The report goes into detail about the GIFCT’s primary work streams, providing greater insight into how the Hash Sharing Consortium has defined terrorist content, and the volume and types of content included in the database. The full transparency report, which is available here, will complement the transparency reports put out by individual GIFCT member companies.

A toolkit to counter violent extremism


When we committed to the Christchurch Call to Action and issued a nine-point plan outlining concrete steps we plan to take as an industry, we said, “We come together, resolute in our commitment to ensure we are doing all we can to fight the hatred and extremism that lead to terrorist violence.” Never has that commitment been more important. As industry partners, we continue to prioritize and deepen engagement with governments, civil society and smaller tech companies around the world.

In partnership with Tech Against Terrorism, we’ve held 11 workshops in nine countries on four continents. We’ve met with 120 different tech and innovation platforms, and we have provided funding to secure Jihadology.net to make sure that researchers studying terrorism can still access primary research material while ensuring that terrorists and people vulnerable to recruitment cannot.

Today, we are also rolling out a cross-platform counter-violent extremist toolkit that we jointly developed with the Institute for Strategic Dialogue. The toolkit will assist civil society organizations in developing online campaigns to challenge extremist ideologies, while prioritizing their safety. We know that the technology industry isn’t the best or most appropriate messenger when it comes to pushing back on violent extremists, which is why it’s so important to support civil society organizations that have the credibility and knowledge to combat, respond and counter the promotion of violent extremism online.

Enabling and empowering companies to respond to crises like Christchurch


Perhaps most importantly, today we are adding a fourth pillar to the GIFCT’s core mission: enabling and empowering companies to respond to crises like Christchurch. The horrific terrorist attack highlighted the importance of close communication between members, and between government and the wider industry, which is why we are introducing joint content incident protocols to enable and empower companies to more quickly and effectively respond to emerging and active events.

The protocol, which can be triggered by a real-world event involving murder or attempted murder of defenseless civilians or innocents, outlines steps that tech companies can take to respond quickly to an attack. Based on the joint protocols, we will work together to categorize the type of incident and the anticipated level and degree of online impact. We will also set up formal channels of communication so we can share intelligence and content with non-GIFCT companies and other stakeholders, as needed.

Terrorism and violent extremism are complex problems that require a joint response from industry, governments and wider society. We believe that by working together, sharing the best technological and operational elements of our individual efforts, we can have a significantly greater impact on the threat of terrorist content online than we can alone.

We are grateful for the support of and collaboration with governments, international organizations and NGOs around the world, including the EU Internet Forum and the UN Counter Terrorism Executive Directorate. We look forward to sharing more updates in the coming months.

— The Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism

Source: YouTube Blog