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International Women’s Day at YouTube

Here at YouTube, we love celebrating the diverse group of talented creators that make our platform so unique. And in honor of International Women’s Day, we asked a few of our most dynamic female creators to share with us how they started on their YouTube journeys, and to fill us in on what they’ve learned along the way.



A little about each of them:




Flavia Calina started off as a Brazilian beauty vlogger, but then made a more personal shift by sharing her struggles with fertility. Now a mother of two with a third on the way, she offers up parenting tips and tricks to her channel's 6.4 million subscribers.

Nikita Dragun is an American makeup and beauty guru who made her transgender transformation into an honest, unfiltered series on her 2+ million subscriber channel.


Yammy is a top global gaming creator based out of England who aims to make gaming fun for all audiences. She's nearing 2 million subscribers on her channel.

Komal Pandey is an Indian lifestyle creator with a quickly growing subscriber base of over 690k users...who swears she'll never judge a girl who has nothing to wear out of a closet full of clothes.

And I Get Dressed is an up-and-coming style U.S. channel run by fashion expert and proponent of “inspired inclusive style,” Kellie Brown.



Tell us about starting up your own YouTube channel. What was your motivation and what did you feel like your voice could bring to the world?

Flavia Calina: I first started as a hobby, I wanted a creative outlet to share what I was learning on YouTube. [At the time] it was makeup. But once my audience grew a little, I knew I wanted to talk about my passion and really share my expertise on early childhood education and the importance of raising children with respect in a peaceful environment so we can build stronger individuals, families and communities.

Nikita Dragun: A lot of my first initial trans kind of education came from YouTube in terms of things that weren't necessarily taught to me in my conservative Virginia school. But by doing so, I grew frustrated because I just didn't see anyone like me talking about the things that I needed in terms of my trans identity.

When I first started making videos, I actually wasn't as open about my trans identity. But the second I started being honest, in my very first I'm transgender video, that was the first real viral moment I had. And also too, it was the first time I ever said I'm transgender even to myself. I didn't tell my parents, I didn't tell one person in my life. Once I did that...it's just crazy how much support I was getting from people all across the world from all different types of walks of life And so documenting like my surgeries, documenting my hormones, then just every little step in my transition, was obviously hard and revealing. But I knew a lot of people just didn't know all these things that trans people kind of go through and it opened a lot of eyes.

Yammy: When I originally started my channel, I just started it to make friends. I wanted to be a part of the community. And specifically I wanted to find other females who played games, because back then it was quite hard to find other people with the same interests.

Komal Pandey: Youtube was always a far-fetched dream, but one morning I woke up and decided to just shoot a video and put it up...In a week I bagged 100k subscribers (almost 700k now in a year) and since then my channel has been my first and last love. I am the personal stylist every girl can have at one click and I TOTALLY have their back when they say "I have nothing to wear."

Kellie of And I Get Dressed: I felt like a lot of the fashion people on YouTube, especially the plus-size fashion people, it's more like they're trying things on, different brands. But me having actual fashion industry experience, gives me a little bit of a different vibe. And it could be something cool that people will see that the fashion industry is not only for thin people. Fat people work in this industry. We're successful in this industry. We are stylish and authoritative and the rest of the world, they're listening and paying attention, you know?

Were there any female creators that you admired or found inspirational when you started—and why?

Yammy: There weren't that many females in the gaming community, but there was a channel called iHasCupquake. And she was a huge inspiration to me because her friendly and bubbly persona was kind of—it reminded me when watching the videos of when I would sit on my brother's bed and watch him play on the Mega Drive. It didn't feel like I was watching a game. It kind of felt like I was with a friend. So she inspired me to kind of be the same when I was making my videos. Not be like just a tutorial channel, kind of just like a friendly video.

International Women’s Day is about celebrating and empowering women. From what you’ve experienced, how does YouTube help further these causes?

Flavia Calina: YouTube is an amazing platform to give women a voice. All of us women have a place to talk about sensitive issues such as maternity, loss, infertility, struggles, resilience, strength. We all learn from each other’s experiences and can apply to our own lives and our own community.

Women creators are also businesswomen now, thanks to YouTube, and I feel we are given the same opportunity as everyone else on the platform.

Yammy: So now one of the top gaming channels in the world is run by ItsFunneh, who's a female, and I never thought I'd see the day...but because YouTube is such a worldwide platform, there are so many other people like me who wanted to be a part of the community and found her channel. I just think that's amazing.

Komal Pandey: Like the name YouTube suggests, it's just YOU and your camera. You're one video away from voicing your opinion with the highest degree of freedom and that's a powerful weapon to have. Nothing is more empowering than being on a platform that allows you to use your voice as your weapon.

Kellie of And I Get Dressed: And when it comes to inspiration, there's no greater thing than like some girl who’s six, or some woman who's 60, who are able to turn on a camera, create content, be diligent, and then live the kind of life you want to live because the platform enables you to be an entrepreneur in the greatest sense of the word.

What has been most rewarding for you as a creator?

Flavia Calina: For me, it's to really have a place and a voice to share my experiences and advocate for children for such a large audience. We have an amazing opportunity and responsibility with our community and I’m able to push myself everyday to bring better days not only for my own children but for the children around the world. Another rewarding part of being a creator on YouTube is to be able to do everything from my own home and still be present with my children. YouTube has changed my family tree, my legacy, and I take it very seriously.

Nikita Dragun: I think it's so inspiring to see people who may or may not necessarily be trans or who have no affiliation to gender questioning or gender identity—who are cisgender females—they get inspired by my story because ultimately it's a story about trying to be the best version of yourself. I think everyone goes through this obstacle, right? But for me, three years ago, it was like night and day from now until then. So for people to see me struggle, to see me questioning my identity, to see me financially unstable and going through college and not having all the answers...and still fighting to be who I wanted to be.

Yammy: I've had a lot of comments saying because of your videos, you've inspired me to open up a channel and they're all from younger girls. And that really makes me happy that I've been able to inspire people just like iHasCupquake inspired me. The fact that I was inspired by her, and now I'm inspiring people, and then maybe they'll become a YouTuber and they'll inspire other females. It's kind of like this generational passing on of it's okay to be a female gamer.

Komal Pandey: My audience, for sure. YouTube is the only platform that helps you build a very very very loyal subscriber base. They will love you, protect you, critique you. And they will fight for you with the trolls too!

What has been most challenging about being a female creator?

Flavia Calina: The work-life balance. I’m so passionate about what I do that I find it hard to balance being a wife, mother, daughter, friend, businesswoman, all at the same time.

Nikita Dragun: What was so crazy when I took on this journey was that, you know, for 18 years of my life I was obviously considered a male. I didn't face certain things that women obviously face. When the switch happened, it just became so much more apparent that it was about so many other things than just who I am as a person. It became about what I'm wearing and how I looked and you know, my overall aura...If I wasn’t happy or if I was too confident and I was too stuck up and into myself and it was just so many more comments.

Yammy: So definitely people do judge your appearance a lot more. But also there's another aspect to it, which is because we are female, we tend to only attract a female audience. My audience is 80% female whereas a male gamer would attract both the female audience and the male audience. It's kind of challenging that way. I feel like it's a lot harder to grow if you're a female cause you kind of aiming at other females.

Kellie of And I Get Dressed: The main challenge for me is sort of being pigeonholed because if you're a guy, you can be anything. You know, you can be chubby, you can be classically handsome, you can be funny, you can be smart, and people will give you a chance. They won’t have an expectation of you based on your appearance. And with women, it's totally different. Especially being a plus-sized woman, I can be talking about like the best hotels, and just from looking at me people might say, "Oh, she's just going to do a plus size haul, so I don't need to watch that."

What advice do you have for other women thinking of starting their own channel?

Flavia Calina: Don’t compare yourself to others. You are unique, you have a special talent that no other woman has. Share your voice, your passion and be consistent about it.

Nikita Dragun: You know, everyone can be someone but no one can be you. And obviously, you have to be very strong. You know, lots of comments good and bad, but I just tried to focus my energy on the good and honestly, if I survived high school, I can survive your comments.

Yammy: I would say just do it. Just be yourself. It doesn't matter what you look like, just make videos and go for it. There's nothing to stop you anymore.

Is there anything YouTube can do as a company to encourage female creators more?

Nikita Dragun: I think just supporting the creators and really letting everyone flourish and highlighting unique stories is the way to go. Because obviously the more diverse the better. And I think YouTube is already on the right track with that. But you know, any way that they can help and continue to flourish that I think it will only grow and help everyone.

These responses have been edited and condensed.

Source: YouTube Blog


YouTube Premium teams up with Samsung Galaxy S10 to offer users 4 months free

YouTube is giving Samsung Galaxy S10 customers a reason to celebrate by giving the gift of YouTube Premium! Starting today, users can enjoy four months of free, uninterrupted, ad-free access to YouTube, and our new music streaming service, YouTube Music.

With this new offer, users can bring the best of YouTube Premium and Galaxy S10 together for an incredible viewing and listening experience:



Seamless, ad-free streaming

The world's first HDR10+ certified Dynamic AMOLED screen on Galaxy S10 devices means YouTube videos—including YouTube Originals—look crisper and fuller than ever. And now, you can watch ad-free.



Background play

Keep in your flow, even with your phone in your pocket. With YouTube Premium, you can keep videos playing when the screen is off.



Next-gen downloading

YouTube Premium means you can download videos for when you're on the go. And by connecting with Galaxy S10's next-generation Wi-Fi 6 support, downloading is as fast as it’s ever been.



YouTube Music

A new music streaming app, made by YouTube. Enjoy millions of official songs, albums, live performances, music videos, and more—ad-free, offline and in the background with YouTube Premium.



Galaxy Fold and Galaxy Tab S5e devices will also come with a 4-month offer once available for purchase. And all other Samsung Galaxy device owners who activate a device between February 20, 2019 - February 29, 2020 will be able to try YouTube Premium for 2 months free*. Both 4- and 2-month offers are available globally where Samsung Galaxy devices and YouTube Premium are available**.



Ready to redeem your offer with a qualifying device? Click here.



*Standard eligibility applies: Offer only available to customers who are not current YouTube Premium, YouTube Music Premium or Google Play Music subscribers, have not been YouTube Premium, YouTube Music Premium, YouTube Red, or Google Play Music subscribers, nor participated in a YouTube Premium, YouTube Music Premium, Google Play Music, or YouTube Red trial before. At the end of the trial period, users will be automatically charged the standard subscription price unless cancelled before the end of the trial. Offer must be redeemed by March 31, 2020.

**Offer available to participants in the United States, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada (excluding Quebec), Chile, Colombia, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Peru, Portugal, Russia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Ukraine, and the United Kingdom.

Source: YouTube Blog


More updates on our actions related to the safety of minors on YouTube

Dear Creators,

We know that many of you have been closely following the actions we’re taking to protect young people on YouTube and are as deeply concerned as we are that we get this right. We want to update you on some additional changes we’re making, particularly in regards to comments, building on the efforts we shared last week.


We recognize that comments are a core part of the YouTube experience and how you connect with and grow your audience. At the same time, the important steps we’re sharing today are critical for keeping young people safe. Thank you for your understanding and feedback as we continue our work to protect the YouTube community.



Below is a summary of the main steps we’ve taken to improve child safety on YouTube since our update last Friday:



Disabling comments on videos featuring minors




Over the past week, we disabled comments from tens of millions of videos that could be subject to predatory behavior. These efforts are focused on videos featuring young minors and we will continue to identify videos at risk over the next few months. Over the next few months, we will be broadening this action to suspend comments on videos featuring young minors and videos featuring older minors that could be at risk of attracting predatory behavior.



A small number of creators will be able to keep comments enabled on these types of videos. These channels will be required to actively moderate their comments, beyond just using our moderation tools, and demonstrate a low risk of predatory behavior. We will work with them directly and our goal is to grow this number over time as our ability to catch violative comments continues to improve.



Launching a new comments classifier




While we have been removing hundreds of millions of comments for violating our policies, we had been working on an even more effective classifier, that will identify and remove predatory comments. This classifier does not affect the monetization of your video. We accelerated its launch and now have a new comments classifier in place that is more sweeping in scope, and will detect and remove 2X more individual comments.



Taking action on creators who cause egregious harm to the community




No form of content that endangers minors is acceptable on YouTube, which is why we have terminated certain channels that attempt to endanger children in any way. Videos encouraging harmful and dangerous challenges targeting any audience are also clearly against our policies. We will continue to take action when creators violate our policies in ways that blatantly harm the broader user and creator community. Please continue to flag these to us.



Thank you for your understanding as we make these changes,

TeamYouTube

LIVE TOMORROW: Tune into the BRIT Awards 2019, featuring George Ezra, Dua Lipa and Jorja Smith on YouTube

It’s that time of year again. With awards season in full swing, one of the most anticipated musical celebrations of the year has arrived: The BRITs. Known for its memorable performances such as Stormzy’s “Blinded By Your Grace Pt 2” in the rain and Liam Gallagher’s moving tribute to Manchester—plus top pop culture moments (Ginger Spice’s iconic Union Jack dress, anyone?)—the BRIT Awards are a celebration of UK musical talent on a global stage. And this year for the first time, YouTube Music is the Official Music App of the 2019 Awards and will provide one-of-a-kind access to the show for fans around the world.

For the sixth consecutive year, for those outside the UK, YouTube is letting you in on the action with a livestream of the show from the O2 Arena in London. Just tune in at youtube.com/BRITs on your favorite screen—whether that’s your mobile, tablet or TV—tomorrow, February 20 at 11:30 a.m. PT / 2:30 p.m. ET / 7:30 p.m. GMT. Following the show, no matter your location, you can watch and rewatch the performances on YouTube Music.

Adding to tomorrow’s excitement, YouTube star and global sensation, Todrick Hall, who has 2.9 million subscribers, will present the YouTube Livestream, giving people outside the UK incredible behind-the-scenes access from the show, while providing a front row seat to the drama, gossip, and artist interactions. Vick Hope will join Hall as co-host; and once the show is over, they will continue broadcasting an everyone’s-invited Official After Party on YouTube, recapping the biggest moments from the night.

This year, nominated stars like George Ezra, Dua Lipa, The 1975, Little Mix and Jorja Smith—who either got their start on YouTube, launched albums on the platform, or have used it to grow their fanbases to a global level—are set to perform. Be sure to tune in to see their show-stopping, on-stage renditions of their beloved hits.

For the second year running, comedian Jack Whitehall will be bringing his brilliant jokes and outrageous capers as the event’s host to make the night one you’ll never forget. After all, what could be better than a mix of top-rated musical talent and hilarious antics to make for an unforgettable night?

And as a special treat for Londoners who didn’t score tickets to the O2: select winners from the night will be projected gloriously onto County Hall and Old Billingsgate to make for a magical, one-of-a-kind YouTube Music moment atop the Thames. There will also be a chance to see your favorite nominees and winners celebrated on billboards throughout the country, and YouTube adverts showcasing the official BRITs content on the YouTube Music App.

Geoff Taylor, Chief Executive of BPI & BRIT Awards said, “The BRIT Awards is the most spectacular night in music, showcasing the exceptional talent of a diverse range of British artists at home and around the world. We have seen tremendous growth in the digital and social reach of the BRITs, and partnering with YouTube once again for our live stream of the show enables us to introduce British music to a global audience that is growing all the time.”

And in case you missed it, after the show you’ll find performances from the artists on a special, exclusive YouTube Music BRITs playlist. But for those who want to enjoy the BRIT Awards LIVE—don’t forget to tune in at youtube.com/BRITs on February 20 at 11:30 a.m. PT / 2:30 p.m. ET / 7:30 p.m. GMT.

—The YouTube Music Team

Source: YouTube Blog


Introducing our new strikes system

We're updating the way we give Community Guidelines strikes to be more transparent and consistent. Based on feedback from creators, we're giving everyone new opportunities and better resources to understand our Community Guidelines. We're also revamping our notifications and to give more transparency into why a strike happened, and introducing a consistent penalty across strike types.

Read more about it on the Creator blog.

Source: YouTube Blog


Making our strikes system clear and consistent

We’re updating the way we give Community Guidelines strikes to a new, simpler system. We’ve worked with creators to understand what’s working and what’s not, and you told us that consistent enforcement, clear policies, and transparency about the impact of a strike are most important. So we’re introducing more opportunities for everyone to understand our policies, a consistent penalty for each strike, and better notifications.







More opportunities to learn YouTube’s policies




Although 98% of you never break our Community Guidelines, they are vital to making YouTube a strong community and balancing freedom of expression with the freedom to belong. That’s whyfrom our earliest dayswe’ve relied on a three-strikes system and email notices to give everyone a chance to review and understand what went wrong before they face more severe consequences. And it works: 94% of those who do receive a first strike never get a second one.



We want to give you even more opportunities to learn about our policies, so starting February 25, all channels will receive a one-time warning the first time they post content that crosses the line, with no penalties to their channel except for the removal of that content. This is to make sure everyone takes the time to learn about our Community Guidelines, and then can quickly get back to creating great content and engaging with their audience in a way that complies with our rules.



Along with this new warning, we are also expanding the policy resources available in our help center to give more detail about what behavior will result in a strike. This includes new, detailed examples of the kind of content we commonly see that breaks our rules.


Consistent strikes across all of YouTube




We’re also making the penalty for violating our Community Guidelines the same wherever it happens. While most strikes result from videos, our Community Guidelines cover all content on YouTube, including stories, custom thumbnails, or links to other websites included in a video’s description or infocard.

Previously, not all strikes had the same penalty on your channel. For example, first strikes on videos would trigger a 90-day freeze on live streaming, and second strikes would result in a two-week freeze on new video uploads. We heard from many of you that this was confusing and the penalty didn’t match the source of the strike. Now, based on your feedback, all Community Guidelines strikes will have the same penalty:

As mentioned, everyone who uploads content to YouTube will now receive a warning the first time their content crosses the line. Although the content will be removed, there will be no other penalty on the channel. There will be only one warning and unlike strikes, the warning will not reset after 90 days.




  • The first strike will result in a one-week freeze on the ability to upload any new content to YouTube, including live streaming, and other channel activities. Strikes will expire after 90 days.
  • The second strike in any 90-day period will result in a two-week freeze on the ability to upload any new content to YouTube.
  • The third strike in any 90-day period will result in channel termination.




Transparency about your channel status




Finally, we always want to make it clear why a strike occurred, what it means for your channel, and the next steps that are availableincluding appealing the decision in case you think it was a mistake. To that end, we’re making our email and desktop notifications clearer, and they will provide more details on which policy was violated. We are also adding new mobile and in-product notifications to make sure you have all the important information about a strike available at a glance.



These updates are part of our ongoing work to make sure that YouTube is the best place to listen, share, and create community through your stories. Our strikes system is an important way for us to help creators and artists understand when they’ve crossed the line by uploading content that undermines that goal, and your feedback has helped to make this system work better for the entire community. We’ll build on this and all the progress we’ve made over the last year by continuing to consult with you as we strengthen enforcement and update our policies. We want to make sure they're easy to understand and address the needs of the global YouTube community.




— The YouTube Team

YouTube in 2019: Looking back and moving forward

Dear Creators,



I’m excited to share some thoughts about 2019 and the year ahead, but first wanted to take a moment and reflect on what was an unprecedented 2018. While we experienced tremendous growth across the platform, it was also a time of some tough growing up.



First, some milestones that we hit: the channels with over one million subscribers nearly doubled in the last year, and the number of creators earning five or six figures in the last year grew more than 40%. You’re creating the next generation of media companies and we’re thrilled to see how much the YouTube creator economy is thriving.

Illustrations by Martina Paukova


But one record we definitely didn’t set out to break was the most disliked video on the Internet. Even at home, my kids told me our 2018 Rewind was “cringey.” We hear you that it didn’t accurately show the year’s key moments, nor did it reflect the YouTube you know. We’ll do better to tell our story in 2019.



Last year, we also saw how the bad actions of a few individuals can negatively impact the entire creator ecosystem, and that’s why we put even more focus on responsible growth. We implemented a number of product and policy changes, from information cards on common conspiracies and breaking news shelves from authoritative sources, to consequences for creators who bring harm to that crucial trust you’ve built up with users and advertisers.



This year, I have three priorities: 1) Supporting creator and artist success; 2) Improving communication and engagement; and 3) Living up to our responsibility. Read on for an update on each.



1. Supporting creator and artist success




We know how vital monetization is to creators, and recognize it remains a pain point for many of you. Just as a reminder, we started last year with many of our largest advertisers paused because of brand safety concerns. We worked incredibly hard to build the right systems and tools to make sure advertisers feel confident investing in YouTube, and most are now back. On the creator side, we’ve been improving our classifiers so that we make the right monetization decision for each video. We’ve increased the accuracy of the monetization icon by 40% and are also making it easier for creators to appeal when we make the wrong call. But there’s still more work to do on both of these fronts and we’re committed to getting it right for everyone.



We’ve also been building new ways for you to make money beyond advertising. We expanded YouTube Music and YouTube Premium and made both available in 29 countries, up from just five at the beginning of 2018. We’ve also added other solutions to help you diversify revenue, including Super Chat, Channel Memberships, Merchandise, and Ticketing. Last quarter, we opened up Merch shelf access to all eligible creators globally. We also continued to make channel memberships more broadly available, lowering the subscriber threshold from 100,000 to 30,000.



On the issue of Article 13: A big thank you to all the creators who helped bring attention to the unintended consequences of the proposal—one that threatens the livelihoods of so many creators in Europe and around the world— through your videos, stories, op-eds and shared ideas. You’ve proven to be an influential voice in the debate. Your videos were viewed hundreds of millions of times and a near-record 4.6 million people signed the petition at Change.org.



That awareness you created was critical, since it was clear to me last year when meeting with policymakers in Strasbourg that many of them had heard from large companies, but lacked an understanding of the European creator economy’s impact and size. I shared with legislators the huge economic benefit you all bring to your home countries. In France alone, we have more than 190 channels with more than 1 million subscriptions, with the number of E.U. channels reaching that milestone up 70% year over year.



The debate around Article 13 remains ongoing. This could be decided in the next few weeks, so please keep speaking out on this critical issue for all YouTube creators.



2. Improving communication and engagement




In 2018, we took steps to communicate better with you. We introduced YouTube Studio, a new home base which will be available to all creators this year, and are constantly adding new features to it. Some of the latest include Known Issues, News widgets, and new metrics like thumbnail click-through rates and Merch options.



Many of you told us you prefer hearing from us through social posts, so we set a goal to be more responsive through those channels. In the last year, we’ve increased our number of responses by 150% and made our response times 50% faster.




But we also love meeting you in person. In 2018, we held more than 480 events with over 18,000 creators—from Fanfests, to Creator Summits, to workshops. We even had the opportunity to sit down with some of you for your channels. If you haven’t already seen it, I highly recommend Luisito’s chat with our chief product officer Neal Mohan. Watch this space, as we will invest even more in communication this year.



And it’s the engagement between creators and viewers that truly sets YouTube apart from traditional media like TV. Our goal is to grow this in new ways. One addition last year was the Premieres feature that allows creators to generate a shared experience with fans around new videos. Creators like Lele Pons and Emma Chamberlain used Premieres on their way to racking up millions of views. At its peak, Ariana Grande’s “thank u, next” had 829,000 unique viewers watching and interacting simultaneously, making this video the biggest Premiere ever on YouTube. I’m sure we’ll see even more of these moments in 2019.




We also recently made Stories available to all eligible creators with more than 10,000 subscribers, and opened up Community posts to all channels with more than 1,000 subscribers. Billions of comments were made on YouTube in 2018, and for a better experience, we improved comment ranking, added @mentions in comments and introduced a feature where creators can hold inappropriate comments for review in 10 languages.



3. Living up to our responsibility




It is my personal mission to ensure that we're living up to our responsibilities to our users, as well as to you, the creator community. We made a lot of improvements here in 2018 but recognize there’s still much more to do.



First, more and more people are coming to YouTube for news. Not only have we made changes to ensure they’re having a good experience when they visit, but we’ve prioritized supporting the journalism community. One key effort is the Google News Initiative YouTube innovation funding program, announced last summer. Hundreds of organizations submitted proposals and we awarded grants to 87 recipients to help them build up their video capabilities. We also expanded our breaking news shelf and top news shelves to 31 countries and look forward to expanding them even further this year.



Another focus was on more quickly and effectively removing the content that violates our Community Guidelines, as shown in our report. But we know we need to more clearly communicate about the policies that impact you. Most recently we updated guidance to creators about our policies on custom thumbnails, external links, and pranks and challenges. And our Creator Insider channel covered how we address profanity. Look for more of these types of updates in the months to come.



A major highlight for me in 2018 was watching how creators used YouTube as a way to give back. More than 40 creators worked together last year to benefit eight charities with YouTube Giving, which included our first annual #YouTubeGiving Week program in November. YouTuber Matpat and Stephanie of The Game Theorists helped us kick it off with a special livestream and Matpat said it was “one of the highlights of [his] seven years YouTubing.”



Finally, we’ve seen the incredible momentum around learning and education on YouTube and we’re investing to support its growth. Last year, we introduced the Learning Fund and awarded grants to 65 creators chosen from more than 1,000 submissions. Recipients will be developing multi-session learning content for YouTube, so stay tuned for more details on when that will roll out.



Also, keep an eye out for our first EduCon of 2019, which is coming up in the U.K. in February. We hosted four EduCon conferences around the world in 2018, engaging with nearly 450 creators in the U.S., Mexico, Brazil and India.



Personally, I depended on the learning content more times than I can count. With YouTube’s incredibly busy year, I turned to the platform for some of my workouts and have a lot of appreciation for the yoga YouTubers. The work of all educational creators has brought incredible enrichment to so many lives in so many ways.



All in all, 2018 was a year of change, challenges, and opportunity. This year will undoubtedly be more of the same. Keep the feedback coming—even though sometimes it’s hard to read—it’s your questions and comments that help make YouTube the very best video community for all of us. The creator community is what inspires me daily and makes this platform so special...so thank you again.



Susan Wojcicki, CEO of YouTube

State of the Union 2019: Live on YouTube

Key moments throughout U.S. presidential history have been captured on YouTube, from visiting American troops and celebrating life’s achievements, to taking the oath of office and hosting world leaders. As President Trump begins his third year in office, this tradition continues.

As we have done since 2010, YouTube will live stream the President’s State of the Union address on Tuesday, February 5 at 9 p.m. ET, as well as the response. This year, you can tune in to live streams in both English and Spanish. Here are the channels where you can follow the coverage:




Brandon Feldman, YouTube News and Politics

Source: YouTube Blog


YouTube Music comes to Sonos

YouTube Music just got a little bit louder! Beginning today, YouTube Music is now available to play on all Sonos speakers. Through the Sonos app, fans around the world with a YouTube Music Premium or YouTube Premium subscription can now easily play official songs, albums, thousands of playlists, and artist radioon top of YouTube’s tremendous catalog of remixes, live performances, covers that you can’t find anywhere else.

Check out some of the YouTube Music features available on Sonos:


Recommended

Loaded with listening suggestions based on your favorites, Recommended has playlists for your every mood, plus your favorites and last played, ready to go. From Mellow Moods to Energy Boosters to Throwback Jams, quickly find what’s right for you in the moment.

New Releases

Find a collection of the freshest music specifically tailored to your tastes. Listen to newly released songs and albums. This week, my list featured Maggie Rogers, YouTube Music's latest Artist on the Rise.


Top YouTube Charts

YouTube Charts are the best way to see what’s hot in music right now. The Top 100 Songs chart catalogs the most popular songs globally, and you’ll also find a local version that’s tailored to what’s trending in your country.

Your Mixtape

This personalized playlist features a mix of your favorites and new songs we think you’ll love. It’s constantly updating, so you can always count on Your Mixtape to deliver a new combination right at your fingertips within the Sonos app.

Library

Easily find your saved playlists, albums, and songs in your Library.


Available in all countries where YouTube Music and YouTube Premium are available, fans with a subscription can now easily play YouTube Music through a Sonos app. Already have Sonos and ready to try YouTube Music? Start your free trial at youtube.com/musicpremium, and learn more about setting up your account with Sonos here.

Brandon Bilinski, Product Manager for YouTube Music, who recently listened to "Light On" by Maggie Rogers on his Sonos Play:5

Source: YouTube Blog


Continuing our work to improve recommendations on YouTube

When recommendations are at their best, they help users find a new song to fall in love with, discover their next favorite creator, or learn that great paella recipe. That's why we update our recommendations system all the time—we want to make sure we’re suggesting videos that people actually want to watch.

You might remember that a few years ago, viewers were getting frustrated with clickbaity videos with misleading titles and descriptions (“You won’t believe what happens next!”). We responded by updating our system to focus on viewer satisfaction instead of views, including measuring likes, dislikes, surveys, and time well spent, all while recommending clickbait videos less often. More recently, people told us they were getting too many similar recommendations, like seeing endless cookie videos after watching just one recipe for snickerdoodles. We now pull in recommendations from a wider set of topics—on any given day, more than 200 million videos are recommended on the homepage alone. In fact, in the last year alone, we’ve made hundreds of changes to improve the quality of recommendations for users on YouTube.

We’ll continue that work this year, including taking a closer look at how we can reduce the spread of content that comes close to—but doesn’t quite cross the line of—violating our Community Guidelines. To that end, we’ll begin reducing recommendations of borderline content and content that could misinform users in harmful ways—such as videos promoting a phony miracle cure for a serious illness, claiming the earth is flat, or making blatantly false claims about historic events like 9/11.

While this shift will apply to less than one percent of the content on YouTube, we believe that limiting the recommendation of these types of videos will mean a better experience for the YouTube community. To be clear, this will only affect recommendations of what videos to watch, not whether a video is available on YouTube. As always, people can still access all videos that comply with our Community Guidelines and, when relevant, these videos may appear in recommendations for channel subscribers and in search results. We think this change strikes a balance between maintaining a platform for free speech and living up to our responsibility to users.

This change relies on a combination of machine learning and real people. We work with human evaluators and experts from all over the United States to help train the machine learning systems that generate recommendations. These evaluators are trained using public guidelines and provide critical input on the quality of a video.

This will be a gradual change and initially will only affect recommendations of a very small set of videos in the United States. Over time, as our systems become more accurate, we'll roll this change out to more countries. It's just another step in an ongoing process, but it reflects our commitment and sense of responsibility to improve the recommendations experience on YouTube.

— The YouTube Team

Source: YouTube Blog