Category Archives: Student Blog

Google news and updates especially for students

Advice from Googlers heading to Consortium’s flagship MBA conference June 8-12.


From June 8-12 the Consortium Graduate Study in Mangemen’s 53rd annual Orientation Program (#CGSM53, also affectionately referred to as “OP”) will take place in Houston, Texas. Consortium awards merit-based, full-tuition fellowships to top MBA candidates who have a proven record of promoting diversity and  inclusion. 500+ incoming MBA students from 20 member schools will engage in this immersive experience where they’ll participate in various informational and networking opportunities with their educational institutions, dozens of corporate partners, and their peers.

A team of 20 Googlers, many of them proud Consortium alumni themselves, will be on the ground. Before the fun begins, Googlers offered their advice to students heading to OP and other career fairs, conventions, and conferences.

Editor’s note: all Googlers interviewed and cited will be on the ground at #CGSM53, be sure to drop by our booth and say, “Hi.” We’d love to meet you! 

Can you tell us about the resources you use to prepare for a conference?
“Quora, Financial results/reporting for each company, company websites, Glassdoor.”
- Gbadebo (Debo) Aderibigbe, Cornell Johnson Graduate School of Management, Product Manager - GCP Cloud Services Platform
“I used Google and YouTube a lot to learn about various companies and industries, and to brush up on networking and interviewing skills. This was way before I even thought about working here!”
- Jonathan Beauford, Yale School of Management, Student Development Program Manager
What do you wish you knew before you attended your own Consortium OP?
“There is a lot of opportunity — and a lot of access, but you don't have to apply for every job! Come looking to learn. Ask questions in a space where you are competing less for resources/time than you will be during regular recruiting. Be open-minded to opportunities that drive you towards your ultimate goal for your MBA.
- Debo Aderibigbe
“Take the time to get to know people from other Consortium schools. You'll have the next two years to spend with your future classmates, but only a few days to network with hundreds of students from other schools. Make the most of it.”
- Ryan Steele, University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business, Product Support Manager - G Suite

What was the most exciting part of your Consortium OP experience? Any magical moments?
“The conferences I attended during my pre-MBA experience were some of my first times being around so many ambitious people of color that looked like me. It was truly magical. I loved making new friends and connecting with students from other schools and I've been fortunate to grow quite close to some.”
- Tiffany Anderson, Emory University's Goizueta Business School, Product Support Manager - gTech
“The most exciting part of OP for me was the exposure to a wide variety of companies and industries that I hadn’t considered,  including Google. I was undecided on my post-MBA career path going into business school, and it was a great opportunity to learn about opportunities and industries that I otherwise may not have considered.”
- Ryan Steele

Do you have any tips you’d like to share with aspiring Googlers?
“It's easy to stretch yourself too thin in business school, focus on the things that you're passionate about and really interest you and dive into them!”
- Ben Schwartzbach, New York University - Stern School of Business, Product Specialist - Hardware
“Talk to all of the Googlers if you can and get their perspectives on what they and the others around them seem to do to be successful!”
-Debo Aderibigbe
“Google has opportunities in probably every function that you could think of (and some you wouldn't think of). Don't assume that there's no place for you here if you don't have technical skills or a particular experience. Focus on your transferable skills and keep an open mind in terms of how those skills might be applied to a new field.”
- Jonathan Beauford
“Be open about opportunities at Google. There are a lot opportunities to drive impact at Google as an intern and post-MBA full-time hire.”
- JoAnne Williams, Columbia Business School, Sr. Financial Analyst, Retail Marketing Finance

Any other advice for tackling a multi-day conference?
“All of the companies are there to get to know you! Use the opportunity to explore companies you may not have originally targeted”
- Jasmin Herrera, Tuck School of Business - Dartmouth College, Business Operations & Strategy Lead - Global Partnerships
“Do your research in advance and ask tough questions — it's a two-way experience! Be you — everyone else is taken! Smile and come say hi!”
- Tiffany Anderson
“Be your authentic self — always.”
- Dapo Adeshiyan 
Even if you're not at #CGSM53 we hope you can apply some of this advice to your next career fair, convention, or conference. 

My Path to Google: Brian Calbeck, Mechanical Manufacturing Engineer

Welcome to the 33rd installment of our blog series “My Path to Google.” These are real stories from Googlers, interns, and alumni highlighting how they got to Google, what their roles are like, and even some tips on how to prepare for interviews.

Today’s post is all about Mechanical Manufacturing Engineer, Brian Calbeck. Read on!

Can you tell us a bit about yourself?
I’m from the Bay Area and grew up in Walnut Creek, CA. I received both my Mechanical Engineering undergraduate degree and a Masters in Engineering from California Polytechnic State University (Cal Poly). I interned at Apple during grad school and joined Google upon graduating. I enjoy road and mountain cycling, traveling, and spending time with my wife and two daughters.

What’s your role at Google?
I’m a Mechanical Manufacturing Engineer working on Google’s Data Center Infrastructure. My team figures out how and where to build the hardware that runs Google’s software. I love the challenge of working on cutting edge technology at a scale that you can’t find anywhere else. I’m currently working on building tensor processing unit (TPU) hardware to power our machine learning technology.

Complete the following: "I [choose one: code/create/design/build] for..."
I help build the hardware that runs Google.

What inspires you to come in every day?
I’m inspired by the scale and complexity of the work we do. It’s rare to work on products that will touch billions of people. I remember the first time I saw a demo of Google Photos and was amazed by the app’s ability to understand the content of my photos. Machine Learning is enabling amazing advancements in almost every industry and I love that I get to be at the forefront of that.

Can you tell us about your decision to enter the process?
I was really excited to apply to Google. I had always admired Google’s culture, but I never thought I would find a role as a Mechanical Engineer until I ran across the posting for my current role. I was skeptical that I’d get an interview since I was a new college grad and the role called for someone with more experience, but my dad encouraged me to take a chance so I applied.



What do you wish you’d known when you started the process?
It’s easy to get frustrated with a hiring process when you don’t see everything that’s going on behind the scenes, but know that if you’re being considered for a role you’ve already made it past the hardest part. My recruiter did a great job of talking me through the process and helped me provide an honest and accurate picture of what I could bring to the job.

Can you tell us about the resources you used to prepare for your interview or role?
I prepared by reviewing the details of some technical projects I spearheaded in college and put together a portfolio with visual aides. I wanted to make sure I could clearly recall the details of the projects I worked on and communicate them to my interviewers. Interviewers at Google want to know how you think through multi-faceted problems, so having examples fresh in your mind will help when communicating your skills.

Do you have any tips you’d like to share with aspiring Googlers?
Be honest about your experience, skills, and passions and be sure to communicate how these could strengthen your prospective team. When you’re early on in your college career, look for unique jobs and experiences that interest you and relate to your course of study. Your first internship probably won’t be your dream one. I spent two summers working in a machine shop. I started out sweeping the floors but worked my way up to running the machines. That job not only gave me great hands-on experience but helped me stand out when I went to apply for opportunities later on in my college career.

My Path to Google: Brian Calbeck, Mechanical Manufacturing Engineer

Welcome to the 33rd installment of our blog series “My Path to Google.” These are real stories from Googlers, interns, and alumni highlighting how they got to Google, what their roles are like, and even some tips on how to prepare for interviews.

Today’s post is all about Mechanical Manufacturing Engineer, Brian Calbeck. Read on!

Can you tell us a bit about yourself?
I’m from the Bay Area and grew up in Walnut Creek, CA. I received both my Mechanical Engineering undergraduate degree and a Masters in Engineering from California Polytechnic State University (Cal Poly). I interned at Apple during grad school and joined Google upon graduating. I enjoy road and mountain cycling, traveling, and spending time with my wife and two daughters.

What’s your role at Google?
I’m a Mechanical Manufacturing Engineer working on Google’s Data Center Infrastructure. My team figures out how and where to build the hardware that runs Google’s software. I love the challenge of working on cutting edge technology at a scale that you can’t find anywhere else. I’m currently working on building tensor processing unit (TPU) hardware to power our machine learning technology.

Complete the following: "I [choose one: code/create/design/build] for..."
I help build the hardware that runs Google.

What inspires you to come in every day?
I’m inspired by the scale and complexity of the work we do. It’s rare to work on products that will touch billions of people. I remember the first time I saw a demo of Google Photos and was amazed by the app’s ability to understand the content of my photos. Machine Learning is enabling amazing advancements in almost every industry and I love that I get to be at the forefront of that.

Can you tell us about your decision to enter the process?
I was really excited to apply to Google. I had always admired Google’s culture, but I never thought I would find a role as a Mechanical Engineer until I ran across the posting for my current role. I was skeptical that I’d get an interview since I was a new college grad and the role called for someone with more experience, but my dad encouraged me to take a chance so I applied.



What do you wish you’d known when you started the process?
It’s easy to get frustrated with a hiring process when you don’t see everything that’s going on behind the scenes, but know that if you’re being considered for a role you’ve already made it past the hardest part. My recruiter did a great job of talking me through the process and helped me provide an honest and accurate picture of what I could bring to the job.

Can you tell us about the resources you used to prepare for your interview or role?
I prepared by reviewing the details of some technical projects I spearheaded in college and put together a portfolio with visual aides. I wanted to make sure I could clearly recall the details of the projects I worked on and communicate them to my interviewers. Interviewers at Google want to know how you think through multi-faceted problems, so having examples fresh in your mind will help when communicating your skills.

Do you have any tips you’d like to share with aspiring Googlers?
Be honest about your experience, skills, and passions and be sure to communicate how these could strengthen your prospective team. When you’re early on in your college career, look for unique jobs and experiences that interest you and relate to your course of study. Your first internship probably won’t be your dream one. I spent two summers working in a machine shop. I started out sweeping the floors but worked my way up to running the machines. That job not only gave me great hands-on experience but helped me stand out when I went to apply for opportunities later on in my college career.

Students spend a day with Area 120 — Google’s workshop for experimental products

Google launched from a Silicon Valley garage over 20 years ago, and the magic of garage-style entrepreneurialism is alive and well thanks to Area 120 — an experimental program within Google, aimed to help small teams build new products in an entrepreneurial environment.

Last month, 150 students gathered at Google’s NYC office for the first-ever Inspired@ Summit. The Inspired@ Summit was an opportunity for students to interact with Area 120 co-founders and team members, learn about current projects, and embrace Area 120’s entrepreneurial spirit of “try, experiment, and apply.”  We have gathered some of the key takeaways from the summit and hope that by the end of this post, you also find yourself inspired and ready to build, launch, and improve upon fresh ideas without fearing failure.

Fuzzy Khosrowshahi, an Engineering Director at Google, is serving as Area 120’s Founder-in-Residence. He’s also the co-founder of Google Sheets and helped jumpstart the day as the event’s keynote speaker, sharing his professional journey.  As a former history major, who used to run his own Subway sandwich franchise, Fuzzy reiterated that there is no uniform path to Google and that there are countless ways in which individuals discover their passions and capabilities, “each job offers a learning moment.”

While the Inspired@ Summit introduced attendees to a number of Googlers, the attendees were also invited to present and share their own stories.


One storyteller, Nia Asemota, a New York University first-year majoring in engineering, shared how she’s overcoming the challenges of being a woman in tech. In high school, she saw how she was relegated to more peripheral roles compared to her male counterparts on the school robotics team. As a result, she recognized a need to create her own space to enhance her engineering skills — one where she could thrive as a woman in tech and empower others along the way. Nia’s tenacity led her to go on to form her own all-female robotics team, and later become the only female leading the programming and electrical departments. Nia also became the first female pilot to represent her school in the International FIRST Robotics Competition.

Another student, Bethwel Kiplimo, shared how his path to technology began only three years ago. “Growing up in a rural village in Kenya, I never had a phone. I got my first one as a present from a local leader for performing exceptionally well in the national exams. The nonexistence of roads meant cars or any terrestrial machines beyond bicycles were foreign. However, planes flying high above the valley greatly fascinated me. I lived my childhood life studying so that I can one day build planes or at least get on one. At one time, this dream was lost because no university in Kenya offered aerospace engineering. However, my new phone rekindled the dream. Using Google, I was able to find an organization that paid for my SAT exams and gave me a chance to apply to Princeton. It took just a Google search and determination for me to pursue a dream conceived in the third grade while watching planes fly overhead in the early evenings in a remote Kenyan village, far removed from the rest of the world. This has completely redefined my relationship with technology and I am using it to promote access to education and drive change in my community, country, and our world.”

In addition to motivational talks, attendees had the opportunity to “try, experiment, and apply” in an interactive design thinking workshop led by Chris Ross, a Senior UX Engineer. The workshop introduced students to the creative problem-solving process of design thinking, which focuses on a user-centered approach to create a solution that is both technologically and economically feasible.

Afterwards students met with Area 120 team members and learned about their projects. We asked Googlers Laura Rokita of Pigeon, a “Waze-like app for the subway”, and Aayush Upadhyay of Augmented Reality (AR) Ads, the first project to graduate from Area 120 and evolve into its own team at Google, what career advice they would give students. Though Laura and Aayush had different career paths, they did share a similar overarching message: don’t always expect a linear path — pursue projects you’re interested in, experiment, and embrace where your learnings lead you.

The day concluded with an inspiring and memorable talk given by software engineer Eric Duran, as he touched on imposter syndrome and how he dealt with it. Eric is a New York native from East Harlem, and throughout his talk, he emphasized how this played a key role in his journey to Google. He reiterated the importance of persistence and confidence, “you can really do anything - nothing is stopping you. It’s all about what you tell yourself and [how hard you work]. It’s effort - Try. Experiment. Apply.”

Students who are interested in opportunities to be involved in the “testing” process of Area 120 products, can express interest by completing this application form.




My Path to Google: Reza Khan, Associate Account Strategist

Welcome to the 32nd installment of our blog series “My Path to Google.” These are real stories from Googlers, interns, and alumni highlighting how they got to Google, what their roles are like, and even some tips on how to prepare for interviews.

Today’s post is all about Associate Account Strategist, Reza Khan. Read on!


Can you tell us a bit about yourself?
I grew up in the suburbs of Chicago. I went to DePaul University and earned a Bachelor of Science in marketing with a concentration in sales leadership. I developed a love for selling and digital marketing through my internships (SWC Technology Partners and Adobe). When I am not working, I love spending time with my family, playing tennis, and watching Bollywood movies!

What’s your role at Google?
I am an Associate Account Strategist on the Google Customer Solutions (GCS) team. As a trusted advisor to small and medium-sized businesses (SMBs), I help them grow using Google's marketing solutions. I own a book of business of 120 SMBs and my ultimate goal is to help them find success with Google and ultimately grow their business. Working with SMBs brings a very unique opportunity because our clients wear many hats. The person doing the marketing, could be the same person doing the finances and running the operation.

My days often fall into two buckets: cold calling to schedule consultations with my clients, and having those consultations with my clients. I usually come in around 8 a.m. and start to plan out the consultations I will have with my clients that day. From around 9 - 11 a.m. I cold call and email my book of 120 clients to get more client consultations on the calendar. After outreach, I’ll spend the other gaps in my day taking those scheduled consultations with advertisers. It seems trivial to break the job up into two buckets, but those two buckets have helped me grow multiple skill sets. Being able to work at such scale and drive growth across so many businesses has been so rewarding.


Complete the following: "I [choose one: code/create/design/build] for …"
I create robust digital marketing strategies for SMBs.

What inspires you to come in every day?
I am extremely humbled by Google and the people who work at this extraordinary company. It is empowering to work for a company that puts its people first. I feel like I can bring my whole self to work due to the focus and effort that Google puts on diversity and inclusion, and there is truly no better feeling.

Can you tell us about your decision to enter the process?
I was a senior at DePaul University looking for opportunities in sales. I was always in awe of Google and never thought it was something I could reach for. I saw on the Google student careers site that they were hiring for the Account Strategist role in Ann Arbor, and the qualifications matched my experience. I felt that if I could show that I was made for this role, then maybe that would be enough for me to land a job at Google. My confidence in myself and abilities overcame my fear and I applied for my first job at Google.


How did the recruitment process go for you?
I was referred by a friend from college who worked in the role I was applying for. As I eagerly waited to hear back from my first screening interview, I couldn't help but think, "Wow. I just interviewed with Google." I felt that was an accomplishment in itself.

Once I heard back and knew I had a second interview, I couldn’t stop thinking about the Google interview myths like getting asked questions about how many golf balls could fit in an airplane!
Once the interviews were underway, I saw my interviewers just wanted to understand was how well I could think about and solve problems related to the role. Overall, I had a very seamless interview process and was well informed all throughout of what next steps looked like.

What do you wish you’d known when you started the process?
During the interviews, one thing I wish I had known better, was myself. At the end of the day, interviews are just you talking about yourself. If you are self-aware and know what you excel in, what you can improve on, what you’re passionate about, and what you don't enjoy doing — then it becomes pretty easy to talk about yourself and what you bring to the table.

One thing that surprised me about the role was how much responsibility Google gives you from day one. You are given a book of business (managing a lot of clients) and it’s up to you to help them remain successful and grow profitably. Not only this, but my clients are seeking my advisement on how they should run their business. Coming into this role straight out of college, I never thought I would have so much influence and responsibility so early on, and I'm so grateful for that opportunity.


Can you tell us about the resources you used to prepare for your interview or role?
The main resource I used to prepare for the role was the job posting itself. What the hiring manager is looking for is RIGHT THERE in the posting. For example, if they’re looking for someone who can "communicate effectively across various levels, including senior marketing leaders,” then I would make sure I had a story for how I have done exactly that. At the end of the day, take what they are looking for and talk about how you can manifest those specific skills.

Do you have any tips you’d like to share with aspiring Googlers?
Never feel like Google is out of reach — Googlers are regular people. Find a role that you are passionate about, understand what qualifications they’re looking for, and work directly on building those skill sets.

Leading through Latinidad: takeaways from Google’s Hispanic Student Leadership Summit

Earlier this month, in partnership with the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU) and the Computing Alliance of Hispanic-Serving Institutions (CAHSI), 50 engineering and computer science student leaders from across the United States and Puerto Rico joined us in Austin, Texas for Google’s third annual Hispanic Student Leadership Summit (HSLS). The two days were filled with technical workshops, career discussions, lightning talks, and reflections on what it means to lead through Latinidad.

We gathered some of the biggest takeaways and pieces of advice from the summit below. Read on and visit buildyourfuture.withgoogle.com to stay in the loop on future student opportunities near you:


On navigating a career in tech:
“When I was struggling to figure out my career, I switched the framing and stopped worrying about what job I wanted to do and focused on what problems I wanted to solve.”
— Danyel Rios Printz, Google Senior User Experience Researcher


“I spent most of my career figuring it out, and I still am. It’s okay to be confused. Just follow what you’re good at and be transparent about that with everyone you meet.”
— Hector Ouilhet, Head of Design for Search, Assistant, and News at Google

“Hearing someone with 20 years of experience like Hector talk honestly about how confused he was early in his career and how he’s still figuring it out is inspirational to me. If he overcame hard times and confusion to get where he is today, then I can too.”
— Nuria Pacheco, student at Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico


“In college I didn’t let myself believe that I’d be good enough to work at Google. I rejected myself from opportunities before anyone else could but my biggest advice is don’t reject yourself. Believe that you are good enough.”
— Jessica Slaughter, Google Software Engineer

On leading through Latinidad:
“Recognize your lived experiences as your superpowers and use them to drive you — you’ll shape the future for your family, community, and the world.”
— Joshua Gutierrez, Google University Programs Specialist & Summit Co-Lead


“We must create a new model of leadership that is people-oriented, community-based, and inclusionary. Latino leadership is about participation and leadership by the many.”
— Erika Barrios, student at Florida International University

“Being a Latino leader is about being a beacon for others. I want to be that example of what’s possible. Through high school and college I felt like I had people I could emulate, but in my career I didn’t find that so I want to be that for others.”
— Esteban Morales, Google gTech Technical Lead


“We all come from different places and have gone through different struggles, and I believe that leading through Latinidad means using your pain as a virtue. When we run into pain, it can serve as a talking point for us as a community. For me, being comfortable with your struggle promotes conversation — your pain can be a virtue for not just for you, but for others.
— Immanuel Garcia, student at the University of Maryland, College Park

On the importance of mentorship and community:
“Mentors can come in many different shapes, sizes, and ages — so be open to different experiences. Some of my best mentors in life and career have been very unexpected.”
— Laura Marquez, Head of Latino Community Engagement at Google


“Seek out every opportunity to put yourself out there, even with situations that might make you uncomfortable. You never know who might cross your path and influence your career and life trajectory — and vice versa.”
— Jake Foley, Google University Programs Specialist & Summit Co-Lead

“Even within the Latinx community, there is so much complexity to our identities, but we still share a lot of core values. When we come together for a Latinx event, we celebrate the diversity among us, but our leadership abilities come from our deeper identities. There’s so much power that we take from that.”
— Jaqueline Villalpa Arroyo, student at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock


“Just like tech connects people from all over, we’re well equipped with our Latinidad to enhance connectivity among our peers. We can lead the world and tech industry towards the cognitive diversity that drives innovation and creativity.”
— Erika Barrios, student at Florida International University

Be sure to follow @GoogleStudents (TwitterInstagramFacebookYouTube) and visit buildyourfuture.withgoogle.com to stay in the loop on student opportunities — like when applications for next year’s summit open up!






Code Next: finding friends and community in computer science

Meet Akeena Hall and Daniella Billini Rodriguez—best friends and two of the students in Google's Code Next program in Harlem. Code Next is a free computer science education program that meets Black and Latinx high school students in their own communities. Today, Akeena and Daniella joined us to discuss the impact friends and community can have when learning how to code and what it’s really like to be a young woman interested in coding.


What got you interested in computer science and coding? 

Akeena: I didn’t know anything about computer science until I was in sixth grade. I went to the school Daniella was previously going to, Bronx Community Charter School. It was really interesting to me because it was something I wasn’t exposed to before. It was something that stuck to me. I was in Girls Who Code sixth through seventh grade, and then I started getting more involved in technology and robotics.

Daniella: I started when I was in third grade. When Akeena came to my school in sixth grade, I was already involved [in computer science]. I’d like to thank my technology teacher — we started off with Blocky, an hour of code, and then Google CS First. I really liked the way she taught CS. It was fun to create something of my own.

What does support look like to the both of you? How do you support one another?

Akeena: If I don’t know how to do something, but it’s Daniella’s strong suit or Daniella doesn’t know how to do something and it's my strong suit — we help each other. It’s basically a balance of skills and characteristics, learning in diversity. At Code Next we laugh together, but it’s because we’re a community. If we didn't feel safe to have a group chat, we couldn’t do this. It’s all about being able to share the same interests and be comfortable.

Daniella: AND be weird with each other!

Akeena:  We’re very weird, and it’s so cool. I’ve never been exposed to such a weird, intelligent group of people before. I feel like community is a bunch of people who share common ground, common interests, and who support each other in different ways.

Daniella: We have each other. If I don’t get something — I’ll ask one of my peers. And when people need help, they’ll come to me or I’ll go up and do the problem on the board so they can see what I’m actually doing. I think that’s what support looks like.  

How does it feel being young women in computer science?

Daniella: It kind of feels weird, being in a room full of men sometimes. It can be really intimidating, but at the end of the day, I feel so powerful knowing what I do know. If any girl loves computer science I’m like, “heck yeah! Keep doing what you’re doing.”

Akeena: When I was told girls were underrepresented in the technology field, I didn’t feel a certain way because I was always involved in communities that were so inclusive. But then I got to high school, and the first day of school I realized that 71% of our school are males. I started to realize how many girls were in the room. It empowered me to do other things. 

What types of things?

Akeena: I just recently started a club, where we’re bringing the limited amount of girls in our school together and empowering each other by sharing and learning from our own experiences. I was taught to be a facilitator by Girls Inc. and brought it to my school with other friends.

What do you want people to know about you?

Akeena: I want people to know that I take education seriously. I really fought to have the education I have and to just be able to be in the environment I'm in. Not to toot my own horn, but, Toot Toot!

Daniella: I definitely agree. I take my education very seriously and it’s one thing I don't really play around with.

What do you want to be when you grow up?

Daniella: I really love the ocean. I’m very much a humanitarian. I really want to be a marine biologist, but I might want to become a computer scientist.

Akeena: Honestly, when people ask me, I don’t even know what to say because I don't think there’s a stop to what I want to and could do. I do want to be a computer scientist, but I was thinking about starting a curriculum for girls who want to get involved in the technology field. I don’t know. I just want to do so many things!



Looking for a coding community of your own? Learn about how to get involved with Code Next and continue following @GoogleStudents on FacebookTwitterInstagram, and YouTube to connect with other code-happy individuals!

Live from #NSBE45 — how to get the most out of career fairs, conventions, and conferences

Yesterday in Detroit, Michigan the 45th annual National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) convention kicked off. Today marks the beginning of arguably the biggest event of the week … the annual career fair. Googlers are currently on the ground and ready to meet the 12,000+ attendees. 

Embracing this year’s theme, NSBE 45: Explore, Engineer, Elevate.,  Googlers attending #NSBE45 (many of whom previously attended NSBE conventions as students) offered their advice to students and aspiring technologists tackling the career fair for the first time.

Note: All Googlers interviewed or pictured below will be on the ground over the next few days — so if you're at #NSBE45, be sure to drop by our booth and say hi. We'd love to meet you!  


What would you encourage someone to do to make the most of their time at the convention? 
"Talk to professionals currently doing what you would love to see yourself do and ask them questions about their career path." - Adekunle Adeyemo, Systems Engineer, Site Reliability Engineering
"Meet new people. You will be surrounded by brilliance so challenge yourself to establish a relationship with someone new each day." - Jana Landon, University Programs Specialist, HBCUs
"Be open to new opportunities! Learn as much as you can about different companies and roles. Don't be afraid of exploring a new job option that you might not have known about before." - Noel Elgamal, University Recruiter
"Research 7-10 companies that you want to work for, memorize their mission, know their founders, and know what roles are open that you want." - April Curley, University Programs Specialist, HBCUs
"Network, be authentic, remember names and FOLLOW UP!" - Jojo Johnson, Information Technology Resident

What career advice do you have for aspiring technologists who will be attending the conference?
"Be curious and ask questions — learning how to investigate systems and figuring out how parts interact is a great skill that'll help in your career." - Desiye Collier, Software Engineer
"What do you find yourself researching/reading/doing when no one is around? Take whatever popped in your head and try to build a career around it." - Kenny Sulaimon, Program Manager, Android System Health 
"Get everything you can out of every opportunity! Make your time mean something." — Kim Martin, Software Engineer
"Be yourself — don't conform for anything. You're unique and bring something to the table that's missing, so share all that you are." - Bakary Diarrassouba, Program Manager, Privacy
"Try to keep an open mind. You may not find the position you are looking for, but once you get your foot in the door, then you can look towards the position you really desire." - Everone Graham, Information Technology Resident

Why is attending NSBE meaningful to you?
"I received my first full-time offer through a NSBE conference, giving back means everything to me." - Bakary Diarrassouba, Program Manager, Privacy
"It's important for me to see and be an example for other Black Computer Scientists." - Kim Martin, Software Engineer
"NSBE to me is like a second family. Without NSBE I would not be where I am today and I am forever grateful for that. I got my first Google job at a NSBE conference and since then I've been able to go back and help other people get opportunities just like me. Attending NSBE is my way of giving back to my community and also reuniting with the family that gave me the opportunities I have today." - Kenny Sulaimon, Program Manager, Android System Health 
Even if you're not at #NSBE45 we hope you can apply some of this advice to your next career fair, convention, or conference. Follow along as we go behind the scenes at #NSBE45 including at the upcoming hackathon in our Detroit office Mar 29-30 : Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.



Black History Month Pay It Forward Challenge: Recognizing students making a difference (Part 3)

In honor of Black History Month, Google hosted a Pay It Forward Challenge to recognize Black student leaders who are advancing opportunities for their local communities. We ended up receiving so may great submissions that we decided to make this a three-part blog series. This is the final piece. We’re excited to share the work of the students below and hope you’ll be inspired by their stories.

ICYMI, be sure to check out Part 1 and Part 2 of this post.


Ayoola John-Muyiwa

While studying at the University of Houston, Ayoola founded an online learning community for Black millennials, Blademy. Blademy helps ambitious Black millennials develop new skills in technology, media, finance, business and entrepreneurship.

"It became apparent to me that my community has been unable to benefit significantly from the burgeoning innovation economy. I was doing my part by helping a handful of people every week, but I needed to help them at scale to disrupt the current trend in economic opportunity disparity. Today, growing at 50% month-over-month, Blademy reaches over 400,000 millennials monthly with instructional content. The company was also recently accepted into the Google Cloud for Startups Program. In 2019, I hope to reach more millennials of color with instructional content and continue to inspire more young people to prioritize solving problems in their communities.”

Ayoola's advice to others:
“As long as there is one person out there who can benefit from your talents and ideas, I strongly encourage you to step outside your comfort zone and start solving problems you care about. Besides, if you choose to ignore the problems in your own community, why should outsiders care? Just start!”

Ashley Fox & DeAndrea Staes

During their second year of studies at McCombs School of Business, The University of Texas at Austin, Ashley and DeAndrea saw an opportunity to promote diversity and inclusion in their MBA program and larger Austin community. They founded the Elevate Diversity & Inclusion Conference and used 100% of the proceeds to create a scholarship to support underrepresented candidates at The University of Texas.

"Beyond actively participating in student organizations to promote diversity at McCombs, we decided to create a sustainable, long-term solution that would provide an annual forum for the University of Texas and Austin community to engage and learn about diversity, culture, and community.  The Elevate Diversity & Inclusion Conference at McCombs was held February 8, 2019 and educated attendees on the impact, challenges, and future of diversity and inclusion for business. Attendees heard from distinguished speakers at Google, PepsiCo, Dell, Cross Culture Ventures, Kapor Capital and more. We hosted panel discussions on inclusion and innovation in tech, minority and women funding needs in venture capital and the importance of diverse talent having a seat at the table. Attendees left with concrete leadership strategies and tools that will advance the inclusion agenda across all spectrums."

Ashley & DeAndrea's advice to others:
“Think big. Big beyond what you imagine lies in the realm of possibility. Believe in yourself and then think BIGGER.”

Edward Mancho

Motivated by his own experience with imposter syndrome during his sophomore year in college, Edward created a student organization, Code: Black, at The University of Maryland, College Park catering specifically to minorities in tech. Since it's creation Code: Black has now grown to over 100 members.

"The first year was a tough one because I had no experience in creating and running an organization, so it was a lot of trial and error to the point where I had to get the help of my friends. Once I had my friends on the executive board, the organization was able to grow. The Computer Science department flew us out to AfroTech. We've had companies sponsor and give tech talks to our members. We teach elementary school kids how to code. Through Code: Black, we've created a community, given people opportunities to get internships, and created workshops to better prep our members for the outside world. This is just the beginning."

Edward's advice to others:
“Seeking a problem to solve is easy but taking action is the hardest part. Despite the notion, this shouldn't discourage you because every big, impactful movement has started as an idea.”

Oluchi Chukwunyere

Oluchi is currently a student at North Carolina A&T State University and the co-owner of Janet Hope Alive, a non profit organization that equips Nigerian citizens with programing and entrepreneurship skills through hands-on programs and mentorship.

“We aim to increase the quality of life for our students and increase Nigeria’s economic stability. Last year we were able to graduate over 400 students. That's over 400 students whose lives have been changed through our program and now the chairman of the community wants to adopt our program in twelve of his vocational schools. We’re bringing hope back to Nigeria."

Oluchi's advice to others:
“Never let your gifts and talents take you to a place where your character can't sustain you. Always remember it’s about the people. It’s always about the people. Always remember your 'why' so when greed and fame come, you remain grounded in your passion”

Charles Arday

Charles is currently a student at Illinois College. With his passion for public speaking and motivating others to achieve their goals, he created The Millennial Podcast, where he addresses topics in the millennial community including finding your passion. He is also the co-founder of Students of LinkedIn — a community with a mission to educate and encourage people from all walks of life to share their stories, build their personal brand, and get their dream internships/jobs. Charles has spoken at multiple events on the topics of digital literacy, collaborative thinking, and mentorship.

“My experiences and interactions with other college students made me realize that issues such as depression and not knowing your passion are problems many of us are faced with — so I began releasing weekly podcasts and videos to equip millennials with resources and tools to address these issues. I am passionate about educating, motivating and exposing my peers to the field of STEM and the limitless opportunities in the world."

Charles' advice to others:
“Everyone can make an impact no matter where they find themselves. Three things that have been with me since I started all my initiatives include know your why, be persistent, and just do it."

Keep up with us on social (TwitterInstagramFacebook, and YouTube) to hear more about our initiatives.

Last call for Google’s Computer Science Summer Institute applications

Applications for Google’s Computer Science Summer Institute (CSSI) and the Generation Google Scholarship close on Monday, Mar 18. Submit your application today!


Ever wonder what it’s like to be a CSSIer? Meet Jonathan James Mshelia, Tarik Brown, and Kaycee Tate — three CSSI students from this past summer here to share their CSSI experiences and give any CSSI/Generation Google applicant (we’re lookin’ at you!) a better idea of what’s to come.
Jonathan is currently a junior at Medgar Evers College. He grew up in Nigeria and moved to America to pursue an education in computer science. When he’s not glued to the computer screen, he’s usually hanging out with friends or learning a new language.
Tarik is now a freshman at the University of Notre Dame (Go Irish!) where he intends to double major in Computer Science and Economics. He has a deep love for jazz and the world of technology (especially robotics). Tarik lost hearing in his right ear when he was young and explains that he is, “quite grateful for this disability because it made me into the dedicated and motivated person that I am today.”
Kaycee grew up in Alabama and is currently attending Xavier University of Louisiana. If she’s not studying for her double major (Computer Science and Computer Engineering) or working on campus, she enjoys quiet time reading, coloring, or researching things that interest her — currently it’s investing and digital currency.

What motivated you to apply to CSSI?


Kaycee: I knew that I wanted to expand my mind as much as possible before getting to college so that I was prepared — not only in actual programming and coding skills, but also in the ability to think creatively and share my perspective in innovative ways. I definitely believe that the CSSI experience gave me a chance to do that.

Tarik: From as early as I can remember, I was always interested in how things worked. This inclination to enjoy knowing the inner workings of everything that I worked with steered me into the direction of the tech world and introduced me to Computer Science.

Jonathan: My passion for computers and my attitude towards learning were the driving forces behind my choice to join the Google CSSI program. Before CSSI, I only tried to learn the syntax of a programming language and I did not necessarily know how to apply what I learned to make anything, but during the CSSI program I put these programming languages into proper use and I began to see it differently.


What do you wish you’d known before you arrived at Google for CSSI?

Tarik: A valuable lesson that I learned from Google’s Computer Science Summer Institute was that I am much more capable than I give myself credit for. Imposter Syndrome is real and it affects many, I wish I had known that there was no reason to doubt myself and CSSI definitely gave me a more positive outlook upon my ability and self worth.

Jonathan: Upon getting started at Google CSSI I had some experience with a few front end technologies and that gave me the ability to learn more and improve my skills. The learning experience was fun so I never thought about wishing I knew more than I already knew.

Kaycee: Before going to CSSI, I wish I had truly understood that it didn’t matter how much you knew about computer science and programming prior to the experience. Of course the FAQs and application mentioned that, but truly processing that and just hearing it are two different things.


Can you tell us how the CSSI experience has impacted you?

Jonathan: The CSSI experience opened my eyes to the possibilities technology has to offer. I now understand the internal workings of the web — how the front-end and back-end worked hand in hand to give a fully functioning website. This helped me at college because I was able to accomplish more in terms of applying my knowledge to school work.

Kaycee: CSSI isn’t just about computer science — I feel like CSSI promotes the idea that to be good in anything you do, you first have to know yourself, what you’re striving for, and what you want to get out of every experience you are able to partake in.

Tarik: The knowledge I gained from CSSI was truly invaluable. We delved into the world of web development and received instruction on front-end and back-end web development. We ran the gauntlet when it came to learning multiple programming languages as we learned HTML/CSS, JavaScript and Python — all essential tools in web development. Also, we learned how to utilize the Google Cloud Engine which is actually used to run well known applications such as Snapchat. With this we were able to create our own web application from scratch and it was truly an amazing experience. Not only did I gain a wealth of technical skills, I also acquired essential soft skills that involved collaboration in small teams and being able to explain my work to others. We learned how to tactfully use version control with Github and focused on team based work. In the end, we presented our projects to the entire office of Google Software Engineers.

Reminder: applications for Google’s Computer Science Summer Institute (CSSI) and the Generation Google Scholarship close on Monday, Mar 18. Submit your application today!