Category Archives: Google Scholar Blog

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2018 Scholar Metrics Released


Scholar Metrics provide an easy way for authors to quickly gauge the visibility and influence of recent articles in scholarly publications. Today, we are releasing the 2018 version of Scholar Metrics. This release covers articles published in 2013–2017 and includes citations from all articles that were indexed in Google Scholar as of July 2018.

Scholar Metrics include journal articles from websites that follow our inclusion guidelines and selected conference articles in Computer Science & Electrical Engineering. Publications with fewer than 100 articles in 2013-2017, or publications that received no citations over these years are not included.

You can browse publications in specific categories such as Food Science & Technology, Sustainable Energy, or Public Health as well as broad areas like Engineering & Computer Science or Humanities, Literature & Arts . You will see the top 20 publications ordered by their five-year h-index and h-median metrics. You also can browse the top 100 publications in several languages - for example, Portuguese and Spanish. For each publication, you can view the top papers by clicking on the h5-index.

Scholar Metrics include a large number of publications beyond those listed on the per-category and per-language pages. You can find these by typing words from the title in the search box, e.g., [heart], [water], [saude].

For more details, see the Scholar Metrics help page.

Posted by: Anurag Acharya, Distinguished Engineer

Quickly flip through papers on your phone

Today, we are making it easier to use your phone to find and scan scholarly articles. Clicking a Scholar search result on your phone now opens a quick preview:

You can swipe left and right to quickly flip through the list of results. Where available, you can read abstracts. Or explore related and citing articles, which appear at the bottom of the preview along with other familiar Scholar features.

When you find an interesting article, you can click through to read it immediately, or you can tap the star icon to save it for later in your Scholar library. You'll need to sign in to the same Google account on both the phone and the laptop to use this feature. This lets you find and save papers on your phone wherever you are. Once you get home, you can grab a cup of coffee and click "My library" on your laptop to get to your reading list.

Quick previews are available in Chrome, Safari, Samsung, and other standard browsers on recent Android and Apple phones. Sorry, they won't work in Opera Mini or other special-purpose browsers; and they are not, at this time, available on tablets.

We would like to thank our partners in scholarly publishing that have worked with us on this. Working together, we hope to help make research more efficient everywhere.

Posted by: Alex Verstak, Software Engineer

Follow Related Research for Key Authors

Scholar provides several ways to keep up with research in your area. You can set up keyword alerts, get recommendations related to your publications and follow your colleagues’ profiles.

Today, we are adding another approach to stay up to date in areas of your interest. Now, in addition to following articles by and citations to an author, you can follow research that is related to her work.

To follow related research for an author, simply go to her public profile, click “Follow” and select “New articles related to this author’s research”. Scholar will automatically scan all new publications for articles related to her research and will send them to you as an email alert.

This is particularly useful if you are a graduate student or an early stage researcher. By following related research for your advisor, your thesis committee and possibly a few key faculty members in your department, you would be able to see the research landscape from their experienced vantage point.

It is also useful if, like myself, you are an industry or medical professional who isn’t active in the research realm but would like to keep up. By following related research for leading scholars, you will be able to quickly view relevant articles in key areas.

The astute reader has no doubt guessed that this can also be used to get email alerts for research related to your own work -- go to your public profile, click “Follow” and select “Recommended articles”.


Posted by: Anurag Acharya, Distinguished Engineer

Better ways of getting around

If you thought Google Scholar had about twenty different screens, you'd be half right. We have just made it easier to find your way around them.

Settings, advanced search, case law, and "my library" moved into the side drawer, which is now present on all screen sizes and all devices. If you're wondering how to get to a Scholar feature that you don't immediately see, it's probably in the drawer; click the menu icon in the upper left of the screen to open it.

"Cite" and "save" options under each search result moved to the left and became icons.  The quote icon shows formatted citations in a variety of styles - MLA, APA, Chicago, Harvard, Vancouver, - and links to export the citation to EndNote and other bibliography managers.  The star icon saves the search result to your personal library, so you can read or cite it later.  To review your saved articles, open the drawer and click "my library".

Author profile pages got a cleaner look, especially on mobile devices.  Rest assured, we did not change your citation counts - at least, not intentionally.  It is, however, a good time to review your photo - it's now a circle - and to update your affiliation and research interests.  Please visit your profile to review and update it.

Posted by: Alex Verstak, Software Engineer

Query Suggestions for Detailed Queries


Last year we added query suggestions to help students explore topics they may not be familiar with. These suggestions go from a broad search to deeper and more specific areas. But many of you are already well familiar with your research area, and your searches are already specific and detailed. Sometimes, it's good to take a step back and go into a different, but related, space.

Today, we're adding query suggestions for detailed queries. They help researchers explore topics related to the original query. For example, consider the query suggestions for [semantic segmentation object detection]. They cover:
Semantic segmentation: [semantic segmentation rgb d images], [fully convolutional networks for semantic segmentation], [deep structured models for semantic segmentation], [indoor semantic segmentation], [fast semantic segmentation], [semantic segmentation scene classification], [semantic segmentation deconvolution network]
Object detection: [localization accuracy object detection], [joint object detection], [real time object detection]
Combination of concepts: [rich features object detection and segmentation], [semantic segmentation context for object detection]

Note that query suggestions appear below search results.
The new query suggestions span all broad areas of research. For example, see [prions protein folding], [global stock market portfolio selection], [test salmonella spp], [racial discrimination and gerrymandering], [gamma irradiation diamond detector], [binary planet formation], [aspect based sentiment analysis], [axial flow turbojet engine].

For now, the additional suggestions are limited to English queries. We plan to expand the coverage to more languages.


Posted by: Namit Shetty, Software Engineer

2017 Scholar Metrics Released


Scholar Metrics provide an easy way for authors to quickly gauge the visibility and influence of recent articles in scholarly publications. Today, we are releasing the 2017 version of Scholar Metrics. This release covers articles published in 2012–2016 and includes citations from all articles that were indexed in Google Scholar as of June 2017.

Scholar Metrics include journal articles from websites that follow our inclusion guidelines, selected conference articles in Computer Science & Electrical Engineering and preprints from arXiv and NBER. Publications with fewer than 100 articles in 2012-2016, or publications that received no citations over these years are not included.

You can browse publications in specific categories such as Ceramic Engineering, High Energy & Nuclear Physics, or Film as well as broad areas like Engineering & Computer Science or Humanities, Literature & Arts . You will see the top 20 publications ordered by their five-year h-index and h-median metrics. You also can browse the top 100 publications in several languages - for example, Portuguese and Spanish. For each publication, you can view the top papers by clicking on the h5-index.

Scholar Metrics include a large number of publications beyond those listed on the per-category and per-language pages. You can find these by typing words from the title in the search box, e.g., [allergy], [cardiología], [biomarkers].

For more details, see the Scholar Metrics help page.

Posted by: Anurag Acharya, Distinguished Engineer

Classic Papers: Articles That Have Stood The Test of Time

Scholarly research is often about the latest findings - the newest knowledge that our colleagues have gleaned from nature. Some articles buck this pattern and have impact long after their publication.

Today, we are releasing Classic Papers, a collection of highly-cited papers in their area of research that have stood the test of time. For each area, we list the ten most-cited articles that were published ten years earlier.

This release of classic papers consists of articles that were published in 2006 and is based on our index as it was in May 2017. To browse classic papers, select one of the broad areas and then select the specific research field of your interest. For example, Agronomy & Crop Science, Oil, Petroleum & Natural Gas, and African Studies & History.

The list of classic papers includes articles that presented new research. It specifically excludes review articles, introductory articles, editorials, guidelines, commentaries, etc. It also excludes articles with fewer than 20 citations and, for now, is limited to articles written in English.

Posted by: Sean Henderson, Software Engineer

Organizing your Scholar library

Google Scholar Library allows you to build your personal collection of articles within Scholar. You can save articles right from the search page, organize them with labels, and use the power of Scholar's full-text search & ranking to quickly find just the one you want. You decide what goes into your library and we provide all the goodies that come with Scholar search results - up to date article links, citing articles, related articles, formatted citations, links to your university’s subscriptions, and more.

As personal libraries have grown over time,  managing them takes more effort. Today we are making organizing your library easier by making it possible to update or export multiple articles with a single click. For example, if you are writing a new paper, you can quickly export the articles to cite to your favorite reference manager; if you are grouping papers that explore different aspects of your research area, you can select all papers in a sub-field and label them with one click.



If you don’t yet have a library,  it is easy to create one.

Posted by: Deepak Jindal, Senior Staff Engineer

Organizing your Scholar library

Google Scholar Library allows you to build your personal collection of articles within Scholar. You can save articles right from the search page, organize them with labels, and use the power of Scholar's full-text search & ranking to quickly find just the one you want. You decide what goes into your library and we provide all the goodies that come with Scholar search results - up to date article links, citing articles, related articles, formatted citations, links to your university’s subscriptions, and more.

As personal libraries have grown over time,  managing them takes more effort. Today we are making organizing your library easier by making it possible to update or export multiple articles with a single click. For example, if you are writing a new paper, you can quickly export the articles to cite to your favorite reference manager; if you are grouping papers that explore different aspects of your research area, you can select all papers in a sub-field and label them with one click.



If you don’t yet have a library,  it is easy to create one.

Posted by: Deepak Jindal, Senior Staff Engineer

2016 Scholar Metrics Released


Scholar Metrics provide an easy way for authors to quickly gauge the visibility and influence of recent articles in scholarly publications. Today, we are releasing the 2016 version of Scholar Metrics. This release covers articles published in 2011–2015 and includes citations from all articles that were indexed in Google Scholar as of June 2016.

Scholar Metrics include journal articles from websites that follow our inclusion guidelines, selected conference articles in Computer Science & Electrical Engineering and preprints from arXiv and NBER. Publications with fewer than 100 articles in 2011-2015, or publications that received no citations over these years are not included.

You can browse publications in specific categories such as Food Science & Technology, Sustainable Energy, or Public Health as well as broad areas like Engineering & Computer Science or Humanities, Literature & Arts . You will see the top 20 publications ordered by their five-year h-index and h-median metrics. You also can browse the top 100 publications in several languages - for example, Portuguese and Spanish. For each publication, you can view the top papers by clicking on the h5-index.

Scholar Metrics include a large number of publications beyond those listed on the per-category and per-language pages. You can find these by typing words from the title in the search box, e.g., [journalism], [saúde], [genes].

In this release, we have added per-language pages for five new languages - Russian, Korean, Polish, Ukrainian, and Indonesian.

For more details, see the Scholar Metrics help page.

Posted by: Anurag Acharya, Distinguished Engineer